Photo Credit: Jodie Maoz

You may think you have done so much wrong that G-d no longer considers you one of His children, but remember that G-d still calls you His child. We are taught, “For good or for evil you are always called His children” (Kiddushin 36a).

Let us even assume that G-d has dismissed you as being His child. Still, you must say, “Let Him do as He wills. I must do my part and still act like His child” (see Rabbi Nachman’s Wisdom #69).

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Rebbe Nachman once told a story about his grandfather, Rabbi Nachman Horodenker, of blessed memory, who related the following:

“I was once traveling on a ship. We ran out of provisions and were without food for several days. Finally, we reached an Arab city where there were no Jews. An Arab took me in and offered me food. I had not eaten for several days, and quickly washed my hands and said the blessing for bread. I was just about to take a bite when a thought entered my mind: ‘Do not eat the bread of one with a mean eye'” (Proverbs 23:6).

Continued the Rebbe’s grandfather, “Our thoughts are not without meaning, and I did not know what to do. I had already said the blessing, but I realized the significance of this thought and was determined not to eat anything of this Arab. Just then another thought entered my mind: ‘I have commanded the Arabs to feed you’ (I Kings 17:4). Then I ate.”

When the Rebbe told this story about his grandfather, he commented how proper it was for him to act according to this thought. Every such thought that entered his mind, must have contained some element of truth.

The same applies to the confusing thoughts a person has to deal with. A confusing thought may enter your mind, but if you stand firm, G-d will send you another thought to encourage you.

Similarly, you may imagine that you are no longer one of G-d’s children. But if you do your part, G-d will eventually send you thoughts of encouragement. In truth, all Israel are called children of G-d. Therefore, you should pour out your thoughts and troubles before G-d, just like a child does before their father.

(Adapted from Sichos Haran #6)

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Rabbi Nosson Rossman is a rabbinic field representative for the Orthodox Union. He can be reached at nathanlrossman@gmail.com.