Photo Credit: David Cohen / Flash 90
Father and daughter building a Sukkah for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in the streets of the northern Israeli city of Tzfat, September 29, 2020.

The construction projects are temporary in nature, and will be removed by the end of the month at the very latest in most cases. Welcome to the Jewish holiday of Sukkot 5781/2020, one of the most joyous festivals in the Jewish calendar.

A strictly Orthodox Jewish man builds a “sukkah” for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in Jerusalem on September 30, 2020.
Photo: Yonatan Sindel/Flash 90

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Jews building a “Sukkah” for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in the streets of the northern Israeli city of Tzfat, September 29, 2020.
Photo: David Cohen/Flash 90

Jews in the holy city of Jerusalem, and in fact all throughout the State of Israel, are building “sukkahs” — four-sided huts of varying sizes — next to their homes, many of which are topped with bamboo poles and green palm fronds on their roofs. Many people have a custom of decorating their sukkahs with all kinds of creative works of Judaic art, fruit and other items.

A strictly Orthodox Jewish man builds a “Sukkah” for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in Jerusalem on September 30, 2020.
Photo: Yonatan Sindel/Flash 90

An Orthodox Jewish man carries palm branche sat the Mahane Yehuda Market. The palm branches will be placed on the roof of a”sukkah” built for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot. Sukkot commemorates the Israelites 40 years of wandering in the desert and a decorated hut or tabernacle (sukkah) is erected outside religious households as a sign of temporary shelter on September 30, 2020.
Photo: Olivier Fitoussi/Flash 90

Sukkot commemorates the shelters used during the journey of the Israelites’ 40 years of wandering in the desert, and a decorated hut or tabernacle (sukkah) is erected outside religious households as a sign of temporary shelter.

Jews building a Sukkah for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in the streets of the northern Israeli city of Tzfat, September 29, 2020.
Photo: David Cohen/Flash 90

Orthodox Jews buy palm branches in the neighborhood of Mea Shearim to be placed on the roof of a sukkah built for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Sukkot.
Photo: Olivier Fitoussi/Flash 90

Building the sukkah is always a major event for most families, and often involves children. In Israel, most of the municipalities trim their date palms the week leading into the holiday, just in time to provide residents with bunches of 10 palm leaves each for the schach; in some towns and cities, the bunches are sold for $10 to $15 (NIS 50) a piece to cover the cost of the collection, distribution and cleanup. But regardless of who does the building or how many people are at the table, once the holiday arrives, there’s no limit to the smiles under the sun and stars in the sukkah.

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