Photo Credit: Yonatan Sindel / Flash 90
Israeli police officers during clashes outside the Al Aqsa Mosque, in Jerusalem's Old City on April 17, 2022.

The United Nations Security Council is set to discuss the violence on the Temple Mount in a special meeting on Tuesday, according to Israel’s KAN 11 public broadcaster and the AFP news agency.

Arab “worshipers” rioted for a third day in the Temple Mount compound, forcing Israeli police to respond with crowd control measures.

Advertisement



“In the past week, a wild Hamas-led incitement campaign has been waged against us,” Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said in a statement Monday evening.

“Here’s the truth: Israel is doing everything so that everyone, as always, can celebrate the holidays safely — Jews, Muslims, and Christians.

“We expect everyone not to join in the lies and certainly not to encourage violence against Jews.

“The State of Israel will continue to keep our capital Jerusalem open to all.”

Bennett said forces with more weapons experience have been added on the streets of Israel, and that all IDF soldiers from weapons grade three and above have been instructed to leave their homes with their weapons. In addition, he said, “We have extended the work hours of Israel’s security guards.”

The prime minister said in a separate tweet that it has also been approved for the Border Police fighters and the skilled police officers at weapons grade five and who have not met the criteria for licensing weapons to date, to obtain a license for personal weapons after their release (from mandatory service).

Arabs on the holy site also piled up rocks, cinder blocks and ancient archaeological artifacts to block the path taken by Jewish visitors to the Temple Mount.

While Jews walked the abbreviated route around the compound, Arab women standing nearby chanted, “Kaybar Khaybar ya yahud” – a reference to the 628 CE Battle of Khaybar between Muhammad, founder of Islam, and the Jewish community of Khaybar.

In a rare response, the Jews shouted back, “Am Israel Chai” and “Amalek,” “Nakba” and “Abu Hadir.”

The inciting Arab women fled to the mosque, pursued by Israeli police. Other Israeli police officers immediately threw the Jews off the Temple Mount for having responded to the provocation.

“There are quite a few events and attempts to ignite the field, and not just in Jerusalem,” Israeli Police Commissioner Kobi Shabtai noted.

Shabtai made the statement after a situation assessment held following the morning Birkat HaKohanim (Priestly Blessing) by thousands at the Western Wall.

Advertisement

SHARE
Previous articleJordan Further Incites Temple Mount Rioters, Summons Israeli Envoy for Rebuke & Traps Israeli Tourists
Next articleForeign Ministry Issues Defensive Response to Jordanian Incitement on Temple Mount
Hana Levi Julian is a Middle East news analyst with a degree in Mass Communication and Journalism from Southern Connecticut State University. A past columnist with The Jewish Press and senior editor at Arutz 7, Ms. Julian has written for Babble.com, Chabad.org and other media outlets, in addition to her years working in broadcast journalism.