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Home » Judaism

‘Frumer’ than God?

Religious woman walking by a vandalized poster in Jerusalem

Photo Credit: Yossi Zamir/Flash90

The clear words of the Rambam reverberate in my ears when the above anecdotes continues to occur, to my utter disbelief and dismay [Laws of Deot 3/1]: “Said our sages- the Nazarite, that only forbade wine on himself, needs atonement. How much more so one that prevents himself/herself from everything. Therefore, our sages commanded that one shall not prevent himself except from that which the Torah forbade….and the sages stated; Is it not enough that which the Torah forbade, you go ahead and forbid yourself from other things…!

We are commanded to be steadfast Jews, adhering to the laws of the Torah, be they logical laws, incomprehensible ones, convenient laws or inconvenient laws. Some are biblical, other rabbinic, and yes – some are pure stringencies needed and warranted in certain situations. While keeping such a lifestyle is far from easy, we dare not create a new religion in which we turn to be more “frum” than the Torah demanded. But even more so, we dare not create a lifestyle, like the women above, which runs counter to the Torah itself! Let us never forget the confession many say on the eve of Yom-Kippur, moments before the onset of “Kol Nidrei” fills the air, as part of the famous תפילה זכה:

How can I come before you and what remedy can I ask for?

I was life a rebellious son, like a slave rebelling against his teacher.

That which you have purified I have deemed impure, and that which is impure I deemed pure.

That which you have allowed I have forbidden, and that which you have forbidden I have allowed.

That which you loved I hated and that which you hated I loved.

That which you have been lenient on I have been stringent, and that which you have been stringent I have been lenient…

and with utter audacity I come before you to ask to atonement. 

About the Author: Rabbi Yehoshua Grunstein is Director of training and placement at The Straus-Amiel Institute at Ohr Torah Stone.


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4 Responses to “‘Frumer’ than God?”

  1. Chaiya Eitan says:

    Very disturbing to read this….and even more disturbing to know that children are being raised in these non-Jewish ideas.

  2. exactly -knowing children are being raised w/these false ideas is terrifying.

  3. Sam Benson says:

    And to not accept a chumra is to be an apikorus. Ahh, to live in a world of black & white with no grey: no thought, no decisions, no individuation–one halacha fits all! And that halacha is no longer based in Torah or Shulchan Aruch but whatever stringency one can find (e.g. the moslims cover their women with a chador, now we should, too!)

  4. Anonymous says:

    This author cites examples of Segulos and calls them chumros, thus throwing anyone who won't listen to a woman sing under the bus with Esrog-eating-women-in-labor. Nice way out of dealing with the breaches of halacha in your own community.

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