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October 24, 2016 / 22 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘loss’

Met Council and NYC Food Bank Launch Virtual Food Drive for Passover

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

This Passover season, more than 100,000 Jewish families in NYC will find themselves struggling to put food on the table, according to the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty. Many households have lived through job loss, dwindling savings and maxed-out credit cards.

Met Council and the Food Bank For New York City, two of New York City’s major hunger-relief organizations, have partnered to fight hunger by launching an interactive Virtual Food Drive, which will remain live through April 14, 2012.

Unlike a traditional food drive, the Virtual Food Drive mirrors the experience of online grocery shopping.  Users will be able to choose staple Passover items to fill a shopping cart and then check out to make a secure donation.  Thanks to Met Council and the Food Bank’s wholesale purchasing power and efficient distribution models, dollars are stretched to ensure the maximum impact is made through each donation.

On the reverse side, some 15,000 Jewish homes will be issued pre-paid debit cards — from $50 to $300, depending on family size and needs — to help with the cost of Passover holiday preparations.

“There is a sense that Jewish poverty is an oxymoron, people don’t think that there are poor Jews out there,” said Met Council CEO Willie Rapfogel. “Passover is a time of year when people ask for help. Everything in the ‘fridge and pantry can’t be used. They need everything.”


Jacob Edelist

Rav Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg, ZT”L

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

The Jewish Press joins Klal Yisrael in mourning the loss of Rav Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg, a world renowned Talmudist and posek, longtime rosh yeshiva of Yeshiva Torah Ore in Jerusalem, and one of the foremost figures in the yeshiva world for three quarters of a century.

Recognized in his early years as a Talmudic prodigy, he developed a reputation for heroic immersion in Torah study, often at the price of great physical deprivation. A prolific writer, he authored several important works, including Tabaas Hachoshen, a comprehensive analysis and explanation of the seminal classic Ktsos Hachoshen, by R. Aryeh Leib HaCohen Heller, long regarded as an essential exploration of the Torah laws governing business and financial transactions.

Over the years he directed the education of thousands of students, many of whom went on to leadership positions in Jewish religious, educational and communal circles.
May his memory be a blessing.

Editorial Board

Meet Josh Mandel, Rising Ohio Jewish GOP Rock Star

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

Meet Josh Mandel, who won the Ohio GOP primary and will take on Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, in the fall. A new-age GOP, his fiscal policy comes down to this: he says the country needs to undertake “sweeping regulatory reform.”

Mandel, 34, has been compared to the other dashing, young conservative, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.. Next week, Rubio is coming to Ohio to campaign with Mandel. “This guy is the real story coming out of Ohio,” one longtime GOP consultant in the state tells me. “He’s the rock star of the party.”

He has a serious battle ahead, against incumbent Brown, who holds a double-digit lead over the former Marine in polls. But he is not discouraged.

Brown will “still be beating us in the polls probably through the summer, maybe even into the early fall,” Mandel said. “The only poll we care about is Election Day and on Election Day, we’re going to win. He has an advantage in that he’s got great name ID. His name ID, his name recognition, is in the mid-90s. He also has a significant disadvantage in that everyone knows who he is but still less than half the people want to rehire him. Our challenge, our main obstacle, is building up our name recognition, getting known throughout the state of Ohio.”

The Atlantic’s Molly Ball asked what makes Mandel think he’s ready to be a U.S. senator. She reports: “Mandel looks me gravely in the eye” and responds:

“The Constitution,” he says, pausing for effect, “says that you have to be 30 years old. And I think the people who wrote the United States Constitution had a wisdom about them that was very special, and a vision for America that should be appreciated.”

Another long pause. “I served two tours in Iraq? In the Marine Corps?” he says. “I’m the treasurer of the state of Ohio, where, when the United States credit rating was downgraded for the first time in American history, and 14 government funds around the country were downgraded, we earned the highest rating we could earn on our $4 billion investment fund. Where we navigated the European sovereign debt crisis with a yield, rather than a significant loss like so many other — er, unlike so many other — a loss — you know what I’m trying to say. With a yield rather than a loss, when so many other corporations and organizations and governments lost money around the country.”

Mandel is a strong supporter of Israel. He and his wife Ilana were married in Jerusalem in 2008.

Mandel was a member of AIPAC at the Ohio State University. In 2008, he attended the 2008 AIPAC Policy Conference in Washington, D.C, where he gave an address, and was quoted as saying “It was inspiring, the young people so motivated and gung ho about strengthening the Israel-United States relationship…Israel is our best friend and ally in the Middle East and it’s important that we maintain a strong and lasting relationship with them.”

At that conference, Mandel stated Iran was a threat, and discussed his divestment initiatives as a legislator in Ohio.

In February 2009, during Operation Cast Lead, the Israeli government issued a statement thanking Mandel for his support of the operation.

In May 2009, Mandel was a panel participant at the 2009 Awards and Installation Dinner held by the World Alliance for Israel PAC in the Los Angeles area.

In 2010 the OhioDaily obtained a copy of a letter sent to then Republican Treasurer candidate Josh Mandel from Canton, Oh. Rabbi Leah Herz, who scolded the young Mandel for race-bating:

Mr. Mandel, I do not question your heroism, and like all decent Americans I applaud your sacrifices while serving in our military.  As a Rabbi however, I say, “shame, shame” on the way you have behaved.  You are not a Nice Jewish Boy.

OK, so not everybody loves him…

Tibbi Singer

German Federation Condemns Fans Who Hitler-Saluted Israeli Player

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

The German soccer federation condemned an anti-Semitic act involving Kaiserslautern’s Israel striker Itay Shechter, 24, and says such abuse has to be “nipped in the bud” and “we must act decisively.”

Shechter was subjected to a verbal racist attack while training with his German league club on Sunday, when a group of between five and 10 fans in a crowd of at least 100 chanted anti-Semitic slogans and gave Nazi salutes.

Berlin’s Israeli Embassy condemned the insults.

The club’s official fan group has apologized for the situation. The club says fewer than 10 fans were involved and belonged to a hooligan group banned from games.

Shechter, who is on the DL at the moment, has so far scored three goals in 19 league appearances for Kaiserslautern, who are second from bottom of the league.

Sunday’s taunts came the day after his team’s 4-0 defeat by Mainz – their fourth straight loss – in which Shechter did not play.

It’s a known fact that Germans don’t take lightly to losing (see European history 1914-1945).

Yori Yanover

Halachos Regarding Damaged Property – Replacement Or Reimbursement?

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

This week’s parshah, Parshas Mishpatim, discusses various halachos regarding monetary issues. One of the topics revolves around when one damages another person’s property. One is responsible to pay for the damage that either he or his possessions caused.

The Machaneh Ephraim (Hilchos Nizkei Mammon) discusses the following scenario – one breaks an item that is worth $10 at the time that it was broken. On the day that the individual is to pay, the item has devalued and is only worth $8. How much does he have to pay, $10 or $8? Similarly, can he replace the item with an exact replica of the broken item that is now worth less or does he have to reimburse the owner with the cash value of the item at the time it was broken?

The Gemara discusses the halacha of this case regarding when one steals an item. If the item is still intact, it can be returned even if the price has decreased. If the item is physically damaged, one cannot return it and cannot buy a new one at the lesser price; rather, he must pay the owner what it was worth at the time it was stolen. Here’s the question: Does the halacha of repaying for damages follow the halacha of stealing, or does it differ – allowing one to replace the damaged item at a lower price?

The Machaneh Ephraim says that this is in fact a machlokes Rishonim. The Rambam, Rashi, and Tosafos are all of the opinion that the halacha of paying for damages does not follow the halacha of repaying for stealing an item, and thus one may replace the item at a lower price or pay the current lower price. The Raavad and the Rush opine that the halacha of reimbursing one for damages that were incurred on one’s property follows the halacha of paying for a broken stolen item; thus one is obligated to pay the value that the item was worth at the time that it was broken.

We can simply explain that the machlokes Rishonim depends on the following question: When one damages an item is he obligated to replace the item, either with an actual item or with money to purchase an item at today’s price, or is he obligated to pay for the loss that the owner incurred at the time of the damage?

Based on this, the Machaneh Ephraim explains the following machlokes between the Rambam and the Raavad (Hilchos To’en V’niten 5:2) – the halacha is that mi’de’oraysa one can only swear regarding movable objects; one cannot swear on a matter concerning land. If one claims that his fellow dug two holes on his land and thereby cheapened the value of the land and his fellow only admits to digging one hole, he does not have to swear mi’de’oraysa. Generally, when one admits to part of a claim he is obligated to swear mi’de’oraysa. However, says the Rambam, since this oath would concern land he is exempt from swearing. The Raavad argues that this case is not considered swearing regarding land, but rather they are disputing how much money is owed – in which case he is obligated to swear mi’de’oraysa.

The Machaneh Ephraim explains that this machlokes is dependent on the question that we discussed above. The Rambam, as mentioned earlier, holds that when one damages an item he is obligated to replace it. Therefore, when one damages land he is obligated to replace the land. This being the reason that the Rambam considered the dispute to be concerning land, he was unable to swear mi’de’oraysa. The Raavad was of the opinion that one is not obligated to replace the item that he damaged, but rather that one is indebted to pay the owner the value that was lost at the time of the damage. It is for this reason that the Raavad said that the dispute here concerns money and not land – thereby allowing for an oath mi’de’oraysa.

Reb Chaim Soloveitchik raised the following question regarding this scenario –  there only exists two of a certain type of stamp and they both belong to one individual. Since two of these stamps exist, they are each worth $50. If there would only be one of them in the world, it would be worth $100. If someone were to destroy one of the stamps, would he be obligated to pay the owner or would we say that since there was technically no loss of money – as the remaining stamp increased in value – he is not obligated to pay?

Initially, Reb Chaim said that it is dependent on the question that we mentioned earlier. If the obligation to pay, when one damages, is to reimburse the owner for his loss, then in this case where there was no loss one need not pay anything. However, if one is obligated to replace an item that he damaged, and if he is unable to replace it he must then pay for it, then in this case that finds him unable to replace the item he should be obligated to pay for it.

Rabbi Raphael Fuchs

Miami International Conference On Torah And Science

Monday, December 5th, 2011

How does the brain age? Where is the soul and how does one connect with it when the brain is failing? Does memory loss or mind deterioration diminish the quality of an internal spiritually meaning life? What is the Torah’s perspective and neuroscientific position on the relationship between memory, brain and mind/soul? Can medicine effectively treat the body while ignoring the soul? Holocaust and Alzheimer’s: When the mind forgets does the soul remember?

Issues that have become all too relevant because of increasing longevity and Alzheimer’s will be explored by fifteen distinguished rabbis, medical researchers, clinicians and scholars at the Ninth Miami International Conference on Torah and Science from December 22-25 at The Shul, 9540 Collins Avenue in Surfside. The theme for this year’s conference is “Memory, Soul and Brain – The Meeting Point of Torah, Gerontology and Neuroscience.” Schedules, biographies of speakers and abstracts of their papers can be found on line at www.TorahScienceConference.org.

Israel Prize-winner Rabbi Dr. Prof. Abraham Steinberg will speak on “The Biological Interface of the Brain and the Soul.” The world’s leading neuroscientist in the field of mind research, Prof. Kenneth Heilman of the University of Florida-Gainesville, will discuss “The Spiritual Brain,” Yeshiva University’s Rabbi Prof. Moshe Dovid Tendler will present “Ageism – A Perspective from Jewish Law” and Israel’s Minister of Science and Technology, Rabbi Prof. Daniel Hershkowitz, will speak about “Repressed Memories among Holocaust Survivors.”

Other speakers include Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar of The Shul, Prof. Oren Stier of FIU, Mrs. Leah Abramowitz, a geriatric social work innovator from Jerusalem, Dr. Yakir Kaufman of Herzog Memorial Hospital in Jerusalem, Dr. Daniel Drubach of the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Barry Baumel of the University of Miami, Rabbi Dr. Shimon Cowen of Monash University in Australia, Professor Vera Schwarcz of Wesleyan University and Prof. Joseph Bodenheimer of the Jerusalem College of Technology and editor-in-chief of B’Or Ha’Torah – Journal of Science, Art and Life in the Light of Torah.

The biannual Miami International Conference on Torah and Science was founded by Rabbi Sholom Lipskar and Prof. Herman Branover, a former Soviet refusenik and expert in magnetohydrodynamics. Rabbi Lipskar is joined by FIU’s Prof. Nathan Katz and B’Or Ha’Torah’s Prof. Bodenheimer in organizing this year’s event. These conferences have become an unparalleled event in the field of religion and science, and most of the papers are published in the B’Or Ha’Torah publication.

The sessions – held on Thursday evening, Friday morning, Saturday evening and Sunday morning – are free of charge and open to the public.

The Shul will also host a Torah and Science Shabbaton featuring conference participants as well as FAU’s Prof. Isaac Elishakoff and environmentalist Mordechai Olesky. An elegant Shabbat dinner with the scientists will be held on Friday evening, December 23. Reservations can be made by calling (305) 868-2411, ext. 0. There is a $50 charge for the dinner. Other Shabbat services, lectures and meals are free of charge.

For more information, e-mail spirituality@fiu.edu or lydia@theshul.org.

Shelley Benveniste

Fresh, Fast & Low Fat Dinner Recipes!

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

It’s official. My “just had a baby” card has expired. Now that my son is 15 months old, I can no longer pull that out as an excuse for why I have not yet lost the weight. The truth is, I like food too much to skip meals or do any crash diets. This means that portion control is how I will attempt to get back to my pre-baby weight.

Rather than deprive yourself, it’s best to find a balance between indulging your inner foodie without over eating. If you want pizza, opt for whole-wheat thin crust with lots of veggies, and stick to one slice! When making a sandwich, use whole grains or whole wheat and again, pile on the veggies. Below is a fresh and fast lunch idea for a California Veggie Wrap. Can’t give up carbs for dinner? I have included a few delicious dishes that are low in fat, but loaded with flavor!


California Veggie Wrap My cousin Tova Cunin lives in California. Not only am I envious whenever I see her photos of the sunny state (I live in NY and winter here can be brutal!) but I also get major cravings whenever she posts a photo of her tasty cooking. For lunch I never seem to have the time to prepare myself something nutritious. I usually grab something on the go; however, her latest meal inspired me as it looks delicious and is easy enough to prepare when in a hurry.






Ingredients: Ezekiel Sprouted grain tortillas Hummus Shredded Carrots 1 red pepper cut into strips 1 avocado, sliced into strips



Toast the tortilla for less than a minute. Spread on some hummus. Layer the veggies on top. Roll up and cut in half.



Easy Beef with Broccoli This is an easy way to prepare beef and broccoli without the greasy feeling you would get from ordering takeout! This recipe could also be prepared with mushrooms and red pepper slices. Just add to the pan after cooking the beef.




1 cup rice

1 lb. flank steak, or sandwich steak slices (pepper steak could also be used)

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tsp steak seasoning (I use McCormick Montreal Spice seasoning)

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 teaspoon minced ginger



Steam broccoli & prepare the rice. In a bowl mix together the oil with the soy sauce, ginger and steak seasoning. Marinate the meat for 20 minutes. Heat a wok or frying pan and add 3 tablespoons oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and stir-fry briefly until fragrant. Add the sliced beef & brown. Once it is nearly cooked through add the broccoli. Stir-fry briefly. Serve with the cooked rice.



Tilapia Baked with Cumin The other night I wanted a fresh new recipe for dinner, so I called up my sister-in-law, Sarrit, who told me about the following tasty dish her mom often makes. I am a huge fan of my mother-in-law’s cooking so I knew without a doubt it would taste great. However, I also know that some of her dishes can be somewhat complicated so I was relieved to find out that this one is not only rich with flavor but is also easy to prepare.


Ingredients: Tilapia, either whole or fillets Cumin Black Pepper Paprika Salt olive oil 1 onion sliced 1 tomato sliced Several potatoes sliced thinly



Pour some olive oil and the above listed spices into a 9 x 13 inch pan.  Add potatos, onion, and tomato slices to the pan and coat in the olive oil mixture and then layer.  Rub the tilapia with the same olive oil/spice mixture and place on top of the layered vegetables. Bake at 350 degrees, checking after 45 minutes to see if potatoes are done.

* If you are not using a whole tilapia, and instead are using fillets, check the fish after about 20 minutes and if it is ready take the fillets off of the vegetables and set aside. Return the pan with the vegetables to the oven and bake until potatoes are ready (soft). Then place fillets back on top of vegetables and serve.



Ginger Chicken Strips When I first had my baby, I couldn’t find the time to warm up a bowl of soup for dinner – forget about spending time in the kitchen to cook! Tired of takeout and literally TIRED, I needed a meal that was tasty and easy to make. This is the dish I put together. It is, indeed, fast and delicious. I even had time to take the photo afterwards! Ingredients: 1 cup of brown rice

Nina Safar

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/recipes/fresh-fast-low-fat-dinner-recipes/2011/11/30/

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