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December 26, 2014 / 4 Tevet, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘Sifrei Torah’

Chol Hamo’ed Sukkos

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 40                                                   5773

 

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
October 5, 2012 – 19 Tishrei 5773
6:11 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 7:15 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Chol Hamo’ed Sukkos (see below)
Weekly Haftara: Chol Hamo’ed Sukkos (see below)
Daf Yomi: Shabbos 2
Mishna Yomit: nedarim 10:4-5
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 129:1- 130:1
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Metam’ei Mishkav u’Moshav chap. 13 – She’ar Avos ha’Tum’ah  chap. 2
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:03 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:50 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Fri. Erev Shabbos – All Tefillos as usual but with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Shabbos morning: Shacharis as usual but with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo – Hallel, Hoshanos (no lulav), Kaddish Tiskabbel. We then read Koheles, followed by Kaddish Yasom. We remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark: in the first we call 7 aliyos and read from Parashas Ki Tissa (Shemos 33:12-34:26). The Maftir reads from the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Numbers 29:23-31). The Haftara is Ezekiel (38:18-39:16), Ve’haya Bayom Hahu. In Birchos HaHaftara we mention both Yom Tov and Shabbos.

   Yekum Purkan, Ashrei, half Kaddish, Musaf of Shalosh Regalim with Korbenos Hayom – U’vayom Harevi’i, U’vayom Hachamishi, U’minchasam.

Mincha – Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, Kerias HaTorah, three aliyos in Vezos HaBeracha, Shemoneh Esreh of Shabbos with Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Maariv – with Ata Chonantanu and Yaaleh VeYavo, NO Viy’hi No’am, Ve’ata Kadosh, Havdala in the sukkah. We add the beracha Leishev Basukkah.

Sunday is Hoshana Rabba. We treat this day with some of the gravity of Yom Kippur. Some who are scrupulous immerse themselves in a mikveh. The chazzan dons a kittel. The Mishna Berura (ad loc.) explains that donning the kittel signifies that this day is the point when the seal is affixed in our judgment. Thus some are accustomed to greet one another until Hoshana Rabbah with Gemar Chasima Tova.

The Pesukei deZimra are those of Shabbos and Yom Tov, but we do not say Nishmas – we substitute in its proper place Mizmor LeToda. Yishtabach (some congregations then say Shir Hama’alos mima’amakim while the Ark is open) is followed by half Kaddish. The chazzan then says Barechu and the congregation responds.

Birchos Kerias Shema are the weekday text, followed by the silent weekday Shacharis Shemoneh Esreh with Ya’aleh VeYavo and mention of Sukkos. Following the chazzan’s repetition we take the lulav and esrog in hand for the last time on this festival and recite the blessing Al netilas lulav. We wave the lulav to all six sides, the four cardinal points and up and down, in the order of one’s custom. We hold the Four Species in our hand as we recite the whole Hallel. At Hodu and Ana Hashem we again wave the lulav in the customary manner.

Some congregations – Nusach Sefarad and some Nusach Ashkenaz – are accustomed to recite the Hoshanos after Hallel while others (most Ashkenaz) recite them following Mussaf. For Hoshanos we remove all the Torah scrolls from the Ark. With the Four Species in our hand, we continue to recite the Hoshanos – but on this day we go around the Bimah not once as we do on each day of Sukkos but seven times – saying all the Hoshanos as found in our machzorim.

When we reach the verses Ta’aneh emunim, we set aside the Four Species and take the willow branches – the chabata, which is a bunch of 5 willows bound together). At the conclusion of the Hoshanos we bang the chabata on the ground. The chazzan then recites Kaddish Tiskabbel. Then the congregation says the Shir shel Yom and LeDavid Hashem Ori and their respective mourners Kaddish recitals.

We remove one Sefer Torah from the Ark – we add the Thirteen MiddosRibbono shel Olam. We call 4 aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael) we read in Parashas Pinchas (Numbers 29:26‑34). The 4th aliyah repeats verses 29:29-34.

We return the Sefer Torah to the Ark, the chazzan recites half Kaddish and we say the silent Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh of Mussaf. Following the chazzan’s repetition he recites Kaddish Tiskabbel. Some congregations say Hoshanos now (most Ashkenaz – see above for procedure).

We conclude the service with Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu, Shil shel Yom, LeDavid Hashem Ori and their respective mourners Kaddish recitals.

L.A.’s Torah Celebration

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

A double Hachnasas Sefer Torah celebration, recently held at Shaarei Torah of Los Angeles, began with the kesivas osios at the home of Regina Rechnitz, the Rechnitz family matriarch. The writing of the final letters was followed by a large procession through the streets of Los Angeles to the Shaarei Torah shul, home of the new Sifrei Torah.

(L-R) Yisroel Zev Rechnitz, Rav Yaakov Rechnitz and Shlomo Yehuda Rechnitz leading the Torah procession through the streets of Los Angeles.
(Photo credit: Arye D. Gordon)

The two Torahs were dedicated in memory of Reb Yitzchok Tzvi Rechnitz, z”l, and Reb Chaim Moshe Lapidus, z”l, the grandparents of the Rechnitz brothers, Shlomo Yehuda and Yisroel Zev.

Talmidim from Yeshiva Rav Isacsohn carried lit torches during the procession, and were accompanied by the music of Avraham Fried and the Shira Choir and Orchestra. Following the placing of the Torahs in the aron, Rabbi Nechamia Langer, Shaarei Torah’s rav, delivered divrei hisorirus. In his remarks at a post-Hachnasas Sefer Torah seudah, Rabbi Langer said, “It was a beautiful, well-planned simcha, highlighted by the tremendous outpouring of simchas haTorah by the olam.”

Parshas Miketz

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Vol. LXII No. 51 5772
New York City CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
Dec. 23, 2011 – 27 Kislev 5772
4:13 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Sabbath Ends: 5:24 p.m. NYC E.S.T.
Weekly Reading: Miketz
Weekly Haftara: Roni VeSimchi (Zechariah 2:14-4:7)
Daf Yomi: Bechoros 39
Mishna Yomit: Yoma 6:5-6
Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 207:2-6
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Mechirah chap. 19-21
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:18 a.m. NYC E.S.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:37 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim. We bless the new month of Teves. Rosh Chodesh is two days, Monday and Tuesday. The molad is Sunday morning, 20 minutes and 17 chalakim (a chelek is 1/18 of a minute) after 7:00 a.m. (in Jerusalem).

This is Shabbos Chanukah as well. Friday night we light the Chanukah candles first, and then the Shabbos candles. We use larger candles or more oil to assure that these candles, which we lit earlier, remain lit at least a half hour after shekia. Following Shacharis we recite whole Hallel. We then take out two Sifrei Torah: in the first we read from Parashas Miketz, we call up 7 aliyos. We then place both Sifrei Torah on the bimah and recite half Kaddish. Following the Hagbaha, we read the Maftir in Parashas Naso, from Vayehi Beyom Chalos Moshe (Bamidbar 7:42-47). Haftara same as above. We do not say Av Harachamim. Otherwise the order continues as usual, with the exception of the inclusion of Al Hanissim in the Musaf Shemoneh Esreh. We conclude the service with Mizmor Shir Chanukas Habayis. Mincha: usual Kerias Hatorah, then we add Al Hanissim in the Shemoneh Esreh. At Maariv we say Vi’yehi Noam. Motza’ei Shabbos, in shul we first light Chanukah candles, then Havdala. At home the order is reversed.

The order of the day for Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday (the last day of Chanukah) is as follows: in the Shemoneh Esreh and Birkas Hamazon we say Al Hanissim, no Tachanun or E-l Erech Appayim, whole Hallel followed by half Kaddish (except on Rosh Chodesh, when we say whole Kaddish and Musaf). We then read from the Torah, beginning [on the fourth day] in Parashas Naso (Bamidbar 7:30), each day the first two Aliyos from the Nasi of that day. The third Aliya is from the Nasi of the following day. On the eighth day, the third Aliya concludes in the beginning of Parashas Beha’aloscha (Bamidbar 8:4), half Kaddish, no Yehi Ratzon. After the Torah reading we say Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, we omit Lamenatze’ach and at the usual conclusion of tefilla we add Mizmor Shir Chanukas Habayis.

Rosh Chodesh Teves (two days this coming Monday and Tuesday): Sunday evening; Maariv, we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as Al Hanissim.

Monday morning: Shacharis we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as Al Hanissim. Since it is Chanukah we recite whole Hallel, we then call the first three aliyos and read from Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15) and the fourth aliyah from the Nasi of that day (Bayom Hashi’shi – Bamidbar 7:42-47) followed by Musaf of Rosh Chodesh. Tuesday second day Rosh Chodesh same as yesterday.

Kiddush Levana at first opportunity, or at the latest until Tuesday January 10th at night.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

Parshas Bereshis

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

Vol. LXII No. 41                  5772

 

New York City

CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

October 21, 2011 – 23 Tishrei 5772

5:47 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 6:52 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Weekly Reading: Bereshis

Weekly Haftara: Koh Amar (Ashkenazim: Isaiah 42:5-43:10; Sefardim: Isaiah 42:5-21)

Daf Yomi: Chulin 117

Mishna Yomit: Pesachim 7:11- 12

Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 178:2- 179:1

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Parah Adumah chap. 11-13

Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:20 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 9:57 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

Today, the 2nd day of Yom Tov, is Simchas Torah.

Friday morning: Shacharis – as yesterday, Shalosh Regalim. The kohanim ascend to the duchan during the chazzan’s repetition of the Shacharis Shemoneh Esreh. (The Levi’im, or where there are no Levi’im, the firstborn, wash the hands of the kohanim before the chazzan reaches Retzeh. We do not say Vesei’arev, we do not say Ribbono Shel Olam or Yehi Ratzon. Chazzan and congregation continue with whole Hallel. Chazzan concludes with Kaddish Tiskabbel.

Those who are so honored each read aloud a pasuk in Ata Horeisa – and then we remove all the Sifrei Torah from the Ark.  We now begin the Hakafos circling of the bimah – we go around it seven times in joyous dance.At the conclusion of Hakafos we read in Parashas Vezos HaBeracha (Devarim 31:1-26). We divide the parasha into five aliyos, and we continuously call people (some congregations set the Sifrei Torah at different tables and read from each in order to assure in a quicker fashion that all have their aliyos ) – repeating the order of the keriah many times until all members of the congregation have been called.

We then call the individual who was honored with Chassan Kol Hane’arim. He recites the berachos with all of the children present under the canopy (or tallis). He is followed by the Chassan Torah, who completes the year’s Torah reading (from Devarim 31:27-34:12) to the end of Parashas Vezos HaBeracha.

We call the Chassan Bereishis, who reads from Parashas Bereishis (Bereishis 1:1-2:3). Following the hagbaha and placing the Sifrei Torah on the bima, the ba’al keriah recites half-Kaddish.

We finally call the Maftir who reads from Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 29:35-39; 30:1) and also reads the Haftara (Yehoshua 1:1-18).

We then say Ashrei and Sissu vesimchu beSimchas Torah; many add Hiskabtzu and Agil Ve’esmach.

We now return the Sifrei Torah to the Ark and the chazzan recites half-Kaddish.

Mussaf: in both the silent Shemoneh Esreh and the chazzan’s repetition, the tefilla is for Shalosh Regalim – all references, again, are to Shemini Atzeres. We do not duchan at Musaf, as we had already done so during Shacharis. Chazzan then concludes with Kaddish Tiskabbel. This is followed by Ein KeElokeinu, Aleinu (some congregations add An’im Zemiros) and the respective Kaddish recitations.

Mincha: Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, Shemoneh Esreh of Shalosh Regalim. Everything follows as yesterday.

                        As today is also erev Shabbos and we had made an Eruv Tavshilin prior to Yom Tov, we make all necessary perparations for Shabbos during Yom Tov prior to Shabbos. We must take care, as opposed to Yom Tov, to light Shabbos candles – from an existing flame – not later than the times listed for each locality (5:47 p.m. E.D.T., N.Y.C.). Negligence in this regard can lead to an Issur de’Oraitha – a Biblical violation.

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim, Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan is two days – this coming Friday and Shabbos. The molad is Thursday morning, 52 minutes and 15 chalakim (a chelek is 1/8 of a minute) past 6:00 a.m. (in Jerusalem)

We do not say Tachanun until after Rosh Chodesh (2 Marcheshvan).

Rosh Chodesh, Thursday eve: At Maariv we add Ya’aleh VeYavo. [However, if one forgot to include Ya’aleh VeYavo (at Maariv only) one does not repeat (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, which explains that this is due to the fact that we do not sanctify the month at night]. Following the Shemoneh Esreh, the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel. We do not say Viyehi Noam and Ve’ata Kadosh (some then say Havdala in the Synagogue) followed by Aleinu, and Mourner’s Kaddish.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and yeshivas for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142 –Y.K.

Lain, Smartphone, Lain

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

            As someone who lains fairly often at my synagogue, I don’t consider it a big deal committing to a few aliyot every couple of weeks. I’ve even occasionally lained the megillah. Yet for more than 15 years, there is one Torah reading I have avoided laining at all costs: my bar mitzvah parshah.

 

I lained that parshah for the second time a year after my bar mitzvah. I was wrong in thinking that I knew it perfectly, and the results were not stellar. I made at least four mistakes, which was unacceptable (at least for one laining his bar mitzvah parshah).

 

While growing up, there was a cold competitiveness between the boys in my teen minyan. Believing that middot matters most was not an especially popular trait with my peers, they let me know what they thought of my performance. That was it for laining my parshah past rishon, I decided, and over a decade went by before I would do so again.

 

Fast-forward 15 years, and I still had not lained my bar mitzvah parshah. But when my nephew, who has special needs, read the haftarah in phenomenal fashion at his bar mitzvah last winter, I was inspired to once again lain my bar mitzvah parshah. Since it was going to take a few weeks to relearn it, and I didn’t want to carry around a heavy tikun or photocopy the parshah – as too many tikun photocopies mistakenly end up in the garbage rather than in sheimos – it was fortunate that I was familiar with the five words that have made so many of our lives easier in a variety of ways: there’s an app for that.

 

The good Jews at RustyBrick were among the pioneers in smart-phone applications, creating some of the first – and still best – Jewish apps on the market. Their siddur and kosher apps deserve their own columns, but to me their Tikun Kor’im app is as strong an argument as any that every technological advance can be used as a tool to enhance Torah and mitzvot.

 

While the $19.99 price tag might initially seem a little steep, the app is well worth the cost. On a base level it functions as a regular tikun, with the text of vowels on the right and the keriyah text on the left. But the app’s audio functions take it to another level. One can make an in-app purchase of an audio recording of every Torah parshah for an additional $4.99 per parshah. This enables the ba’al keriyah to listen to a parshah being read while following the text on his iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad (sorry, Droid users, the Tikun Kor’im is not available on your device). While parshah audio is currently available in nusach Ashkenaz, Sephardic laining is available for all of Sefer Devarim – with the other four Sifrei Torah being released in the coming months. Audio for haftarot and megillot will be coming out as well. Within the next year the app should carry audio for everything lained by Orthodox Jews.

 

Some might see the Tikun Kor’im app as a threat to bar mitzvah teachers. Why should parents spend $1,000 for a teacher’s services when they can spend $24.99 on the app and parshah audio? Yet RustyBrick CEO Barry Schwartz sees things differently. “This app was created as an interactive tool for bar mitzvah students. The app can be used with or without a teacher, but having a teacher will help ensure a strong reading.” Schwartz also points out that RustyBrick hasn’t received any negative feedback from bar mitzvah instructors. “In fact, it’s just the opposite,” says Schwartz. “We have teachers contacting us in praise of the app, and who recommend it for their students.”

 

An additional function of the app actually enhances the method of teaching a young boy his parshah. Teachers and students can record and upload their own audio of their lainings and send them to each other. “Your bar mitzvah teacher can be anywhere in the world now,” says Schwartz. Of course many bar mitzvah boys will have a difficult time hearing their awkwardly changing voices, but it’s a worthwhile price for a better lained parshah. The audio recording also provides an option for students who want to avoid the $4.99 parshah fee or who prefer a different tone and pace to RustyBrick’s slower, raspier-voiced ba’al keriah.

 

While it certainly looks much better on the iPad, using the Tikun Kor’im on the smaller-screened iPod touch or iPhone is certainly preferable to carrying around a tikun. I’ve now prepared Torah reading several times using the app while riding on a bus or train. I even used it to help relearn my bar mitzvah parshah. I didn’t make any mistakes this time. And even if I had, no teenagers would have made fun of me, since using an app to learn a Torah reading makes me incredibly cool.

The Five Burnt Sifrei Torah

Friday, May 9th, 2003

There is growing fear that the anti-religious ferment in Israel reflected in the recent startling electoral victory of Tommy Lapid’s Shinui Party also spawned the horrific arson burning of five Sifrei Torah. Police are still investigating the cause of the fire, but arson seems certain. Although news coverage of the incident has been sparse, reports that have appeared have hinted that the perpetrators were not Arab terrorists, but rather anti-religious Jewish Israelis.

As reported in Arutz Sheva the other day, 50,000 people took part in a funeral for the five Torah scrolls. The remnants were taken in a ZAKA ambulance to the Ponevezh cemetery in Bnei Brak and buried there.

One spokesman reportedly told Arutz Sheva that “there is no question that the atmosphere of scorn for the Torah that is so prevalent in some circles is what allows this kind of horrendous act to happen.” It would appear that those who are in the forefront of the so-called “secular revolution” have a special responsibility to weigh the possible consequences of some of their exhortations.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/editorial/the-five-burnt-sifrei-torah/2003/05/09/

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