Photo Credit: Flash 90
Medical technicians test passengers for COVID-19 at Ben Gurion International Airport, March 8, 2021.

All Israeli officials related to the travel industry met Thursday (Oct. 21) with Prime Minister Naftali Bennett to determine the country’s new policy regarding tourism and entry to Israel.

Participating in the discussion were the ministers of Health and Tourism and the director generals of their ministries, the Transportation Ministry Director General, the national coronavirus project manager, the Director of the Public Health Services, the national crossings project manager, the Deputy Attorney General, the Assistant to the Defense Minister on Civil Defense, the Deputy Director of the National Security Council, the Finance Ministry Budget Director, the Director of the Israel Airports Authority, the Director of the Population and Immigration Authority and other professional officials.

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Below is the plan that was approved. It will take effect on November 1 and be updated in accordance with developments and the discovery of new variants.

Of special note is the welcome news that visitors to the Jewish State no longer need a first-degree relative to enter the country. Thus far, it appears only those who are vaccinated or who have recovered from COVID-19 will be allowed entry.

The guidelines are to be brought to the approval of the government “in the near future,” the Prime Minister’s Office said.

The following persons are eligible to enter Israel under the new plan:

• Foreign nationals who have been inoculated with two doses of the Pfizer vaccine at least seven days prior to their day of entry into Israel (7 days must have passed since their second dose upon their arrival into Israel, but no more than 180 days upon their leaving Israel).

• Foreign nationals who have been inoculated with two doses of the Moderna vaccine at least 14 days prior to their day of entry into Israel (14 days must have passed since their second dose upon their arrival into Israel, but no more than 180 days upon their leaving Israel).

• Foreign nationals who have been inoculated with one dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine at least 14 days prior to their day of entry into Israel (14 days must have passed since their second dose upon their arrival into Israel, but no more than 180 days upon their leaving Israel).

• Foreign nationals who have been inoculated with the Pfizer booster and at least seven days have passed, on the day of their entering Israel.

• Foreign nationals who have been inoculated with the Moderna, Sinovac Astra Zeneca and Johnson & Johnson booster and at least 14 days have passed, on the day of their entering Israel.

• Foreign nationals who have recovered from COVID-19 and who present proof of the results of a positive NAAT test at least 11 days prior to their day of entry into Israel (11 days must have passed since their NAAT test upon their arrival into Israel, but no more than 180 days upon their leaving Israel).

• Foreign nationals who have recovered from COVID-19 and have received at least one dose of the WHO-approved vaccines.

Groups exempt from quarantine on the basis of functioning as a capsule that stays together within their own groups:

• Tourists who have been inoculated with a WHO-approved vaccine.

• The group functions in Israel like a ״capsule״, meaning they are only in contact with the people in their group – these groups will not have leisure time and their movement will be restricted in areas in which there is an increased risk of infection.

• Up to 2,000 tourists in a capsule per day (a more stringent plan will apply to mixed groups).

• Either a daily antigen tests or a PCR test every two days must be administered for 14 days from the day of entry into Israel.

• Tourists who have not been in red countries or countries under severe travel warnings in the 14 days prior to entering Israel.

• These groups are not required to undergo serological tests.

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Hana Levi Julian is a Middle East news analyst with a degree in Mass Communication and Journalism from Southern Connecticut State University. A past columnist with The Jewish Press and senior editor at Arutz 7, Ms. Julian has written for Babble.com, Chabad.org and other media outlets, in addition to her years working in broadcast journalism.