Photo Credit: Jewish Press

After the meat is taken out of the water it is placed on a perforated salting board where the water is allowed to drain off. Before the meat is allowed to become totally dry, salt is applied to all areas of the meat and to all areas of the fowl, including its insides. If the meat is too wet, it will melt the salt before the salt has had the chance to draw out the blood. If the meat is too dry, the salt will fall off the surface of the meat. The meat cannot be kashered when it is frozen; rather, it must first thaw out. The salting board should be placed in a slanting position so that the blood is allowed to drain away and not become reabsorbed in the meat.

The salt should be of medium grain, neither to coarse nor too fine. Sufficient salt should be placed on it to make the meat inedible but not so much that would impede the drawing of the blood.

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After lying on the salting board, covered with salt, as described, for at least one hour, the bloodstained salt is removed and the meat is rinsed two or three times in fresh water until the water in which the meat is rinsed is clear.

Meat that has not undergone the process of kashering with salt within seventy-two hours following shechita can no longer be kashered with salt unless it has been watered down within the seventy-two hour period. It may then be kashered with salt before the next seventy-two hour period elapses. Thereafter, the meat cannot be kashered with salt but only by roasting it on a spit directly over the fire. In such a case, the meat is sprinkled with water and salt while it is on the spit and then roasted immediately.

The liver of an animal contains so much blood that it cannot be kashered with salt. First it is rinsed with water. Then it is kashered by placing it on a grate directly over the fire until all the blood has drained out and it assumes a grayish complexion. In order to facilitate the draining of the blood, the liver should be cut in several places and the gall should be removed. During the roasting, one sprinkles salt over the liver and pierces it several times. After removing it from the fire it is rinsed three times with water.

It is then ready to be placed in a kosher cooking utensil for further preparation.

As previously mentioned, certain other organs of the animal, if one wishes to eat them, must be kashered separately, apart from the meat.

Raphael Grunfeld’s book “Ner Eyal on Seder Moed” (distributed by Mesorah) is available at OU.org and your local Judaica bookstore. His new book, “Ner Eyal on Seder Nashim & Nezikin,” will be available shortly.

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Raphael Grunfeld received semicha in Yoreh Yoreh from Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem of America and in Yadin Yadin from Maran Hagaon Harav Dovid Feinstein, Shlitah. A partner at the Wall Street law firm of Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP, where he specializes in cross-border mergers and acquisitions, Raphael is the author of “Ner Eyal, a Guide to Seder Nashim, Nezikin, Kodashim, Taharot and Zerayim” (2016) and “Ner Eyal, a Guide to the Laws of Shabbat and Festivals in Seder Moed” (2001), both of which are available for purchase at https://www.amazon.com/dp/057816731X Questions for the author can be sent to rafegrunfeld@gmail.com