In a sensation for the art world, authorities in Munich revealed that a cache of works, many by artists the Nazis considered “degenerate,” was found in a moldy storeroom in Munich.

The hundreds of works were hoarded by an elderly man who sold some of them to cover every day expenses.

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Included in the cache of 1,500 works – which reportedly are worth billions – are prints, etchings, engravings and paintings by such artists as Pablo Picasso, Max Beckmann, Marc Chagall, Emil Nolde, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Oskar Kokoschka, Paul Klee and Henri Matisse.

The works probably were confiscated by the Nazis as “degenerate” or stolen from Jewish owners, according to the Munich-based Focus magazine, which broke the story of the art cache, which also reported that official searches had been underway for at least 200 of the works. An art historian is now tracing provenance and estimating values.

Reportedly, an art dealer identified as “Hildebrand G.” snapped up the works in the 1930s and 1940s. For 50 years, his son, whose identity has been publicized as Cornelius Gurlitt, apparently hoarded the works in a dark storeroom in his home in Munich, on homemade shelves. They were found by customs officials alongside rotting food and trash.

“Now we need to quickly find out whether there are legitimate owners or heirs. Belated justice is better than none,” said Dieter Graumann, head of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, told the Bild Zeitung newspaper.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. The 80-year-old recluse reportedly made his living by selling the paintings at auction from time to time. Even after the 2011 raid on his apartment, he managed to sell off another one of his paintings — a work by German Expressionist painter Max Beckmann — for roughly a million dollars at the Lempertz auction house in Cologne, according to the Focus report.

    Read more: Germany: 6 Questions on Nazi-Looted Artworks Found in Munich Apartment | TIME.com http://world.time.com/2013/11/04/nazi-art-bust-6-unanswered-questions/#ixzz2jmvqQz5I

  2. Why are we only learning about this now?
    According to Focus, the roughly 1,500 paintings in Gurlitt’s collection were found in the spring of 2011, when authorities searched his home in relation to charges of tax evasion. Tax officials and police thus seem to have known about the artworks for nearly three years, but they failed to make their discovery public. This has already raised concerns about a possible cover-up, with Focus alleging that the authorities “kept the secret” for years.

    Read more: Germany: 6 Questions on Nazi-Looted Artworks Found in Munich Apartment | TIME.com http://world.time.com/2013/11/04/nazi-art-bust-6-unanswered-questions/#ixzz2jmvzmiKn

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