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April 24, 2014 / 24 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘image’

Uprooted

Monday, November 5th, 2012

Liad Arussy sent us this image of a collapsed tree in Fair Lawn, NJ, after Hurricane Sandy. She wrote: “Once stood so strong, now fallen in shame.”

Lying on its side, the tree is not dead, and the slab of grassy soil that was lifted along with its roots is alive, too, only not upright.

I hope whomever it is at the Fair Lawn municipality who is deposited with the responsibility of up-righting the uprooted trees will come over quickly, dig up the hole in the ground and replant this magnificent tree. I hope the orange ribbon, wrapped around the tree like some natural crime scene, doesn’t mean that the tree is slated to be hauled on a big truck and taken to be sliced up into convenient wood slabs.

We have enough wood, what we need are living, breathing trees.

All that Training Pays Off

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

This is the picture of an overworked, dead tired officer somewhere on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, who picked up his megaphone and began to try and talk some sense into Sandy, the ravaging hurricane. The image has gone a bit viral, and so we’re doing our little bit to help it along. We feel that when all else fails, reasoning with the elements is something one should try at least once.

But don’t hang around too long, in case the elements have a devastating comeback…

Majestic Destroyer

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Reader Jonathan Kahanovitch sent us this amazing image of Ms. Liberty under a canopy of ominous clouds.

Destruction can be so pretty.

Hope you’re dry and safe and that you have electricity and Internet. Otherwise, we probably won’t be having this conversation.

Shabbat Shalom.

Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 29

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Sandy battering the U.S. East coast on Monday, Oct. 29 at 9:10 a.m. EDT. At 8 a.m. EDT the National Hurricane Center noted that the center of Hurricane Sandy was located near latitude 36.8 north and longitude 71.1 west. This was about 310 miles (505 km) south-southeast of New York City, and 265 miles (425 km) southeast of Atlantic City, N.J. Sandy was moving north-northwest at 20 mph. Maximum sustained winds are now near 85 mph (140 kph). Tropical Storm force winds extend almost 500 miles from the center, making those winds 1,000 miles in diameter. The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Hillary Giving Away Toys

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton watches a demonstration of drone capabilities by U.S. and Ugandan military representatives at Kasenyi Military Base in in Kampala, Uganda, last August.

The U.S. supplies drones and training to the Ugandan military, which they use in their hunt for Joseph Kony and members of the Lord’s Resistance Army, a militant group operating in Uganda and other central African countries.

That’s so cool, the idea that a bunch of young adults in U.S. military bases around the world can apply their video game skills to taking out bad folks. It so stresses how huge the technological gap has become between Us and Them, that Us no longer need to show up to kill Them.

Back in 1945, the U.S. ultimately won the war because we were able to carpet bomb Germany. We all saw those films: the sky absolutely filled up with B17 bombers. Well, now we no longer have to risk the lives of crew members on those dangerous missions. They get to stay home and do it all from afar, while texting their friends and possibly even ordering pizza.

I’ve read the reports of Al Qaeda and Taliban who are afraid to leave the safety of their homes out in those exotic sounding regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan and Whereverstan – because as soon as they come out, say, to buy a pack of cigarettes at the local bodega, or just walk their goat, a satellite picks up their image and a drone driven by an American teenager with great eye-thumb coordination will surely kill them.

This is so Science Fiction, I can’t begin to tell you. I honestly feel that, starting on 9/11, 2001, we’ve all been transported in a Ray Bradbury alternate universe, where everything we knew is gone, replaced by a very different narrative.

And I’m strangely OK with this narrative, OK with our kids staying home to run our wars by remote control. Makes moms happier. Over on our side, of course.

Training in Lebanon-Like Terrain

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

These are future IDF commanders practice infantry maneuvers in thickets that resemble those found in Lebanon – lots of trees, plants and shrubbery.

We took this image from the IDF Spokesperson’s Office, which also wrote the above inscription.

I shudder at the talk of war. I hate war. I’m not trying to sound liberal or enlightened. I hate war viscerally. I was 12 during the ’67 war and didn’t like it, despite all the miracles. I remember my dad’s ashen face during the three weeks before that miraculous victory. He had seen war. He knew war could come at you and everything you thought would be there forever is suddenly a small heap of rubble. My dad taught me to hate war.

Both my dad and I also recognized that at some point you must fight. We were not pacifists. We just hated war.

I was a soldier in a terrible war, in ’73. It was even more hateful than the one before.

I hated every single war we’ve had to endure.

In the poll we ran over bombing Iran, I checked the option “Avoid attacking at all costs.”

Only 73 out of a total of 1,016 voters sided with me. And 31 chose “Do nothing.”

Seeing this image of sweet Israeli boys preparing to do war in a Lebanese terrain frightens me. I could recite as well as anyone else the sound reasons that exist to send them into yet another war. I only pray we won’t.

Avoid attacking at all costs. I suppose what I really mean is “Avoid attacking for as long as absolutely possible.” Obviously, I don’t mean we should take it on the chin if our somewhat unstable neighbors to the north decide to go nuts on us.

But I can’t bear the thought of yet another war. I’m not ready.

‘Peaceful’ Olive Pickers Stoning Jews on Shabbat

Sunday, October 7th, 2012

Ah, those peaceful olive pickers and the Things they do with rocks….

On Saturday, at noon, local Jews out on a walk at the Aner springs west of the village of Neria in Samaria were attacked by dozens of Arabs throwing rocks, Tazpit reported. The official reason for the Arabs to be in the area was the olive harvest. What can be more peaceful than the olive harvest? And yet, despite the peaceful properties assigned to the olive, despite all those olive branches everywhere – those Arab olive pickers put down the olives and picked up the rocks.

We Jews sometimes would do that to people, get in them the urge to throw things at us.

IDF soldiers from the Duchifat Battalion of the Kfir Brigade were sent to control the situation. During the search for the stone throwers, one Arab tried to run over a soldier with his vehicle.

The sporting Arab was kept by police for questioning and later released.

Local resident told Tazpit that this is not the first incident where Jews on a harmless walk are attacked near the Aner springs. They say two months ago some Arabs threw broken glass pieces into the spring pools so Jewish bathers get cuts while in the water.

Here’s an image of the local Jews when they’re not being attacked by violent local Arabs at the Aner springs.

I believe this is a metaphor for the Zionist endeavor here since the mid 1800s. This is what we look like when no one attacks us.

Matania Aharonowitz / Tazpit

Matania Aharonowitz / Tazpit

Now, This Is a Lulav

Friday, October 5th, 2012

Here’s an image of the Lubavitcher Rebbe benching his lulav and etrog.

 

Nancy commented, when she saw this image, how his eyes always look directly at you in all his pictures.

The etrog is upside down, which I thought meant the Rebbe is about to make the blessing, but reader JK was quick to correct me (from his iPhone) that the Rebbe never turned the etrog upside down and didn’t bench in shul.  He also added: “Get things right before writing to thousands.”

I was impressed by the lavish assortment of hadassim and aravot in his lulav bunch. Why haven’t I thought about it before? All these years I’ve been carefully counting them out, three of this, two of that – when I could have this big, fluffy hedge of a lulav.

This morning I plan to take my spare branches and add them to the ones that have so far survived the daily benching, see what that looks like.

Chag Same’ach!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/now-this-is-a-lulav/2012/10/05/

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