History of the Day School Movement in America (1880 – 1916)

The addition of secular subjects was little more than a concession to the demands of the day.

Rebecca Gratz: Champion Of The Unfortunate

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the lives of most women were centered on family matters. Rebecca Gratz took a very different course. She never married, but instead "devoted her adult life to providing relief for Philadelphia's underprivileged women and children and securing religious, moral and material sustenance for all of Philadelphia's Jews.

The Life Of Rav Shimon Schwab (Part II)

To further improve his English, my father would listen carefully to President Roosevelt's speeches on the radio to pick up the nuances of well-spoken English pronunciation.

Early Jewish Religious Observance In New York

In 1927 Captain N. Taylor Phillips1 delivered an address before Congregation Shearith Israel in New York in which he recalled some of the history and traditions of early New York American Jewry. His recollections give fascinating insight into Jewish religious life in America when the community was still in its infancy.

The Early Jewish Community Of Charleston

The English first settled at Albemarle Point in what is now South Carolina in 1670. In 1680 this settlement was moved to a peninsula between the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, and became Charles Town (named in honor King Charles II). The new location was more healthful than the original settlement, and, since it was behind the islands of a land-locked harbor, provided safety from attack. The name was changed to Charleston at the end of the War of Independence.

Brooklyn Yeshivas In The 1930s (Part I)

Today Brooklyn is fortunate to have a large number of yeshivas and Bais Yaakovs that span the spectrum from Modern Orthodox to haredi and chassidic.

The Inquisition In Mexico

For centuries Mexico was inhabited by a number of different Indian races.

A Jewish Calendar For Fifty Years

One might think to attribute the crudeness of the calendar to the fact that it was produced by a frontier community unable to calculate a more precise table.

The Jews Of Washington During The Civil War

Washington, D.C. was created in 1790 as a result of a political compromise. “Washington was a Federal city. It did not have a ‘State’ government. It was under the direct control of Congress for even the simplest of things; schools, streets, courts and land use by private individuals and corporations. Accordingly, Congress dutifully passed on the last day of the first session of the 28th Congress, June 17, 1844, ‘A Bill, concerning conveyances or devices of places of public worship in the District of Columbia.’

Reverend Henry Pereira Mendes – Safeguarding Orthodox Judaism (Part III)

As this is our third column on the Reverend Dr. Henry Pereira Mendes, we’ll begin with a summary of his life.

Rabbi Dr. Leo Jung: A Leading Light Of 20th-Century Modern Orthodoxy

With his combination of yeshiva and secular education, he was the ideal person to articulate Orthodox Judaism to a generation of Upper West Side, American-born men and women eager to accommodate Judaism with American culture and values.

The Early Day School Movement In America

The development of the Jewish day school in the United States, before the beginning of the modern Jewish day school movement, was sporadic and uneven.

Henry Solomon Hendricks

Unless otherwise indicated, all quotes are from “Necrology: Henry S. Hendricks (1892-1959)” by David de Sola Pool, Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society...

Israel Rokeach (1841 – 1933): Founder of I. Rokeach & Sons

Practically to his last days the patriarchal founder was at his office almost daily and took an active interest in all matters connected with the business.

Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash: Strengthening Orthodoxy In Nineteenth-Century America

Readers of this column are aware that it was not until 1840 that the first ordained Orthodox rabbi, Rabbi Abraham Rice,1 settled in America. Other rabbonim soon began to settle in America. One of them was Rabbi Abraham Joseph Ash.

Harry Fischel: Orthodox Jewish Philanthropist Par Excellence (Part II)

Mr. Fischel had a longstanding relationship with the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS), which was destined to have its name transferred to the rabbinical school affiliated with Yeshiva University.

A Non-Jew’s 1841 Impressions Of Shearith Israel

Lydia Maria (nee Francis) Child (February 11, 1802-Oct. 20, 1880) was educated at home, at a local "dame school" and at a nearby women's seminary. After her mother died when she was twelve, she went to live with an older sister in Maine for some years. She is little known today, but in her time she was a famous anti-slavery activist. She was also a novelist, editor, journalist and scholar. She is best remembered for her poem "Over the River and Through the Woods," which recalls her Thanksgiving visits as a child to her grandfather's home.

Escape From The Inquisition

"In 1478 at the request of the Spanish sovereigns Ferdinand and Isabella, Pope Sixtus IV (1471-84) issued a papal bull allowing for the creation of the Spanish Inquisition.

Early History Of Jews In Chicago

In 1845 the first Jewish organization in Chicago was established under the name of the Jewish Burial Ground Society.

The First Jew To Live In North America

The year 2004 marked the 350th anniversary of Jewish settlement in America.

Rabbi Dr. Phillipp (Hillel) Klein, Talmudic And Secular Scholar

Rabbi Klein delivered his sermons in such a high classical German that a group of his congregants had to repeatedly ask him to speak so he could be understood.

A Special Flag For Abraham Lincoln

In February 1861, Abraham Kohn, one of the founders of Chicago’s Congregation Kehilath Anshe Maariv and at the time the city clerk in the administration of Mayor John Wentworth, presented Abraham Lincoln with a unique American flag.

Judah Touro: Legendary Philanthropist

"[Judah] Touro's name will always be numbered among the foremost in the annals of American philanthropy. His charities knew neither race nor creed, and his public spirit was no less noteworthy."[i]

Louis Raskas Of St. Louis

In the late 1800's and early 1900's America was called the treifa medina by many religious Jews living in Eastern Europe.

Recife – The First Jewish Community In The New World

Many people know that on September 7, 1654, twenty-three Jews arrived in New Amsterdam (renamed New York after the Dutch left).

The Hays Family Of Westchester County

Early American Jewish history is unfortunately replete with examples of observant families who came to America and, within a relatively short period of time, not only abandoned much of their commitment to religious observance but even had the sad experience of having some of their children intermarrying and assimilating. One family that did not follow this trend was the Hays family.

Myer Myers, Master Colonial Craftsman

The mid-1760s marked changes in the direction of Myers’s personal life and business affairs.

Rabbi Moshe Weinberger: Critic Of Jewish Life In America

He was absolutely convinced that, religiously, they were much better off in Eastern Europe and Russia than in America.

Jewish Soldiers Observe Pesach During The Civil War

In the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries Jews in America did not face the level of discrimination encountered by their brothers and sisters living in other lands.

Jacob De La Motta: Early American Jewish Medical Pioneer

The faithfulness and integrity with which he performed the duties and various public trusts, won for him the confidence of his fellow citizens.

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