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April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Erev Pesach’

Pesach

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 14                                       5772

New York City

CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

April 6, 2012 – 14 Nissan 5772

7:06 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 8:14 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Weekly Reading: Pesach Festival (see below)

Weekly Haftara: Pesach Festival  (see below)

Daf Yomi: Kerisos 18

Mishna Yomit: Megillah 4:6-7

Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 34:3 – 35:1

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Milah chap.2 – Seder ha’Tefillos (until the words Nusach Birchos ha’Tefillah v’Siduran)

Earliest time for tallis and tefillin: 5:36 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 9:45 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

This Friday Evening is the start of Pesach and the first Seder.

On Thursday evening we searched for chametz – all remaining chametz, including that which might be stuck to utensils, should be sold to a gentile via the rabbi. The sale is to take place no later than the latest time at which one may yet own such chametz before Pesach (at the end of the fifth hour of Erev Pesach – we divide the daylight hours into 12 equal units called sha’ot zemaniyot). This year that time in N.Y.C. is Friday 11:53 a.m. E.D.T. We may not eat chametz beyond one sha’ah zemanit before that: this year in NYC it is 10:49 a.m. E.D.T. The latest time for burning the chametz, which we have gathered in the search the night before (and which we are now forbidden to own), is 11:53 a.m. N.Y.C. E.D.T.  After the chametz is fully burned we recite Kol Chami’a and thus we are me’vatel – we nullify – our ownership of any chametz that might remain in our possessionthat we have not sold.

While we are now forbidden to eat chametz, we are also proscribed from eating matza [on Erev Pesach] until the Seder. It is customary for all firstborn to fast on Erev Pesach in commemoration of their deliverance from the decree of death to the firstborn that afflicted all in Egypt. Today the common custom is for the firstborn to attend a siyum of a Gemara tractate, which then allows them to eat.

It is customary for those who need an eruv chatzeros (to allow them to carry in communal and joint driveways and courtyards) to make this eruv, once a year, on Erev Pesach, putting aside a matza for this purpose.

When lighting candles Friday evening, we bless both Lehadlik ner shel Shabbos ve’ Yom Tov and Shehecheyanu (N.Y.C. candle lighting time is 7:06 p.m. E.D.T.).

 

Friday Evening: Kabbalas Shabbos (Ashkenaz, begin Mizmor Shir l’Yom ha’Shabbos; Sfard, begin at Mizmor l’Dovid, havu La’Shem… first two stanzas L’cha Dodi and last two stanzas and then Mizmor Shir  l’yom ha’Shabbos, usual Maariv tefillah  followed by Ve Shamru and Vayedabber Moshe followed by the Festival Amida with all mentions of Shabbos, and Vayechulu  (we do not say Magen Avos), Kaddish Tiskabbel at the conclusion. (Nusach Sefarad  and  even certain Ashkenaz congregations include the whole Hallel both evenings – the first night and the second night – with a beracha). Congregations that usually recite the Kiddush in the synagogue on Friday nights do not do so these two evenings; instead, all wait to recite Kiddush at the Seder.

At home on both evenings we recite the Kiddush of Yom Tov (with all references to Shabbos) and Shehecheyanu on the first cup of wine, and we continue with the Seder ceremony, the dippings, matza, maror, Mah Nishtana, the Haggadah, three additional cups of wine, and the Afikoman.

In Kerias Shema at bedtime, these two evenings only, we say only the blessing of Hamappil and the first parasha of the Shema. We delete the other related paragraphs as this night is leil shimurim, when we are subject to special Divine protection.

Shabbos morning: Shacharis for Festivals with Festival Amida (with all Shabbos references). Some say the Yotzros as found in the Machzor, followed by whole Hallel, and we then remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first Torah scroll we read Parashas Bo (Shemos 12:21-51) from “Vayikra Moshe, Mish’chu…” until “Tziv’osam” and call seven Aliyos. In the second scroll we call the Maftir. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:16-25), “U’Vachodesh Harishon” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara in Yehoshua (5:2-6:1, 6:27), Vayomer Yehoshua. In the blessings of the Haftara we mention the Festival and The Sabbath. Being that it is Shabbos we omit Kah Keili, we continue with Yekum Purkan (no Av Harachamim), Ashrei.

Musaf: The Chazzan dons a kittel and intones the half-Kaddish to the special Nusach for Tal. Some have the Gabbai announce Morid HaTal before the silent Shemoneh Esreh and thus Mashiv Haruach Umorid Hagashem is not recited from this day and on. (Others do not announce it before the silent Shemoneh Esreh and thus they stop saying Mashiv Haruach from the Mincha tefilla and on). The chazzan recites the prayer for Tal (dew) in its special  nusach. The Chazzan then continues with Kedusha. After Retzeh, we recite Ve’se’arev and the Kohanim duchan (as it is  Shabbos, we omit the  Ribbono Shel Olam tefilla). We conclude the service as usual.

Chametz Credit Card

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

It’s 1 p.m. on Friday, Erev Pesach. The rabbi had already sold the chametz at 10 a.m. But I forgot to sell mine. Now the synagogue office is closed and I can’t get hold of the form the rabbi uses to sell the chametz. The Torah requires me to remove all chametz from my house on Pesach. But I just cannot bring myself to throw out that Glenfiddich. Is there a way the whisky can remain in my house during Pesach, and would I be able to drink it after Pesach?

The Torah prohibits the consumption and possession of chametz by a Jew after the seventh hour on Erev Pesach and the rabbis prohibit the consumption after Pesach of chametz possessed by a Jew during Pesachchametz she’avar alav haPesach. In order to create a safety zone and avoid the inadvertent consumption of chametz on Erev Pesach after noon, the rabbis prohibit the eating of chametz after the fourth halachic hour of the day. A halachic hour is the unit of time derived by dividing the period of time between sunrise and sunset by 12, and it can be more or less than 60 minutes depending on the time of the year. Between the fourth and the fifth halachic hour of the day one may not eat chametz, but one may still derive benefit from it or sell it to a non-Jew. By the end of the fifth halachic hour of the day, the chametz must be burned – biyur chametz – and legally nullified – bitul chametz – by reciting the nullifying declaration known as kol chamirah. At the same time, the sale of chametz to a non-Jew takes effect.

If the chametz has already been legally nullified and physically burned, so that it is neither owned nor possessed by a Jew, why is it necessary to sell it to a non-Jew? The answer is that the intent to nullify one’s ownership may not have been sincere (that bottle of Glenfiddich) or one may have entertained the thought during the bitul declaration to sell certain chametz rather than nullify it. Furthermore, one may have neglected to destroy all one’s chametz, such as certain brands of deodorants and colognes etc. So, if the chametz is sold, why is it necessary to burn it? The answer is that there is a positive commandment to destroy chametz called hashbata. While it is unnecessary to incur severe financial loss by destroying all chametz, a token amount of chametz should be burned to fulfill the mitzvah of hashbata.

Are you kidding? You know the non-Jew is not going to consume your chametz. He is not really paying you for it; neither is he taking possession of it. He does not even know where it is. Even if he did, how is he going to gain access to your house on Pesach? And what happens if, after Pesach, he refuses to sell it back to you?

If properly done, the sale of chametz is indeed an effective sale. Such a sale should cause as little skepticism on our part as other everyday legal structures such as the sale and lease back of machinery where the equipment never leaves the premises of the purchaser and little money initially changes hands. The fact that the non-Jew chooses not to exercise his right of ownership does not mean he does not have this right. Neither does it render the sale fictitious. In fact, if the non-Jew paid the full value of the chametz and refuses to transfer ownership of the chametz back to the Jew after Pesach, there is no way, under Jewish law, that one can compel him to do so. The sale is irrevocable, unless the non-Jew chooses to rescind it after Pesach.

The origins of this sale can be found in the Tosefta. A Jew and a non-Jew were traveling together on a ship on a business trip. It was Erev Pesach and the Jew had chametz in his possession. He did not want to throw it overboard nor did he want to give it away. The Tosefta permits the Jew to sell it to the non-Jew with the intention in mind of buying it back after Pesach. As long as the transaction is not structured as a conditional sale, it works. Later, the rabbis of the Jewish whisky merchants of medieval Europe further refined the legal structure. Because taking possession of the whisky by the non-Jew often resulted in damage and because few non-Jews were able to afford the full purchase price, the rabbis devised halachic ways to leave the chametz in the possession of the Jew during Pesach even after the sale and to effect the sale for a token up front payment.

“If you cannot remove the chametz,” said the rabbis, “sell or rent the room or space in which the chametz resides.” And based on the concept of a credit sale, already known to the Talmud sages (Bava Metzia 77b), they permitted a token payment to be made up front and the rest to be deferred as an IOU, to be repaid by the non-Jew after Pesach.

Parshas Tzav

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 13 5772
New York City CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
March 30, 2012 – 7 Nissan, 5772
6:59 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 8:06 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Tzav
Weekly Haftara: V’orvoh La’Shem (Malachi 3:4-24, we then conclude by repeating verse 3:23)
Daf Yomi: Kerisos 11
Mishna Yomit: Megillah 2:4-5
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 32:39-41
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Tefillin u’Mezuzah chap. 5 – 7
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:09 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 10:03 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

This Sabbath is Shabbos HaGadol. Many congregations say the Yotzros of Shabbos HaGadol in the Reader’s repetition of the Shacharis Amida. We do not say Av Harachamim or Hazkaras Neshamos. It is customary to recite this Shabbos afternoon the Haggadah from “Avadim hayyinu” until “lechapper al kol avonoseinu.” It is a Minhag Yisrael that the Rav delivers a special sermon this Shabbos, the Shabbos HaGadol Derasha, combining Halacha and Aggada as they relate to the laws of Pesach.

On Motza’ei Shabbos at the conclusion of Maariv we do say Viy’hi No’am and Ve’ata Kadosh (according to the view of Rav Henkin – Aruch Hashulchan and Mishneh Berura citing Sha’arei Teshuva and Pri Megadim, others – Taz opine that since erev Pesach after Chatzos we are not permitted to do any melacha, that we do not say).

As Pesach commences next Friday evening, we search for chametz, this coming, Thursday evening. We put aside the chametz for the following day when it will be burnt. Friday, Erev Pesach – see next week’s luach.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

Pesach Without Pressure

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

I hate to tell you this, but Pesach without pressure is a myth. No matter what anyone tells you (and it’s usually men who tell you that Pesach preparations can be tension free), it just doesn’t exist. To be fair, I don’t know that there is any major holiday or occasion that doesn’t involve some kind of pressure. Eliminating the stress entirely is not a realistic goal. But minimizing it is.

Whether you are home for Pesach or packing up and moving out, it is a major event and, like anything else, requires planning. For those of you who are going to a hotel, I have no advice. Have a great vacation and think of me while you are sitting by the pool on Erev Pesach doing your nails because I promise you, I won’t have polish worthy nails by then. For those of you spending your Yom Tov with relatives, hatzlacha rabbah. I hope everyone gets along well and that the sleeping accommodations are okay. For those of us who are staying home for Pesach, listen up. It’s time to get to work.

Fear not. I am not one of those super efficient people who is ready to kasher her kitchen on Shushan Purim. But I am one of those compulsive people who likes to plan ahead in order to minimize the work, and equally important, the cost of making Pesach, so that both are less intimidating. And believe it or not, the time to get started is now.

I don’t have to tell you just how overwhelming your credit card statement can become Pesach-time. Between making sure that everyone has proper clothing and stockpiling food items, the numbers add up fast, which is why I like to start stocking up on Pesach items now. My first stop for Pesach shopping? My own pantry. You may be surprised to find out how many items you already own that are in sealed containers and have Kosher L’Pesach certification all year round. Check the labels and look for the “P” next to the hechsher. A quick trip through my pantry (know your minhagim) unearthed quite a few products including: assorted coffees and teas, sugar, cocoa, kosher salt, honey, duck sauce, balsamic vinegar and assorted canned goods packed by heimishe companies including sliced mushrooms, hearts of palm, pineapple, sour cherries, Israeli pickles, olives and mandarin oranges. Be sure to check out your freezer as well. Empire raw chicken products are Kosher L’Pesach 365 days a year. So just wipe off your newly acquired Pesach stash, set it aside and you are already one step closer to making Pesach. Make a list of everything you are putting away so that when the time to shop in earnest arrives you will know which items you already own.

Take the time to check out the OU’s Pesach guide (discuss now what your family uses) when it comes out, available both from the OU, in many local kosher stores and online at www.ou.org. Aside from the directory listing items that are supervised for Pesach by the Orthodox Union, the grey pages hold a treasure trove of information telling you which items can be used on Pesach without special supervision. Stock up on those items now as well to help minimize expenses as you get closer to Pesach. No matter when you do your shopping, now or closer to Pesach, take the time to double check every item you put in your cart and make sure it is Pesachdik. You never know when someone will have put an item down in the Pesach area by mistake and trust me when I tell you it is really very disturbing to notice on Pesach that you are holding food that doesn’t say Kosher L’Pesach on it.

Aside from all the cleaning and buying involved for the holiday that is ironically named “z’man chayrusaynu”, the time of our freedom, a major part of your holiday preparations involves food. Before you start googling Pesach cookbooks and recipes, take the time to go through your regular recipes – you may be surprised how many things you make during the year are one hundred percent chometz free. Time is at a premium, so why start experimenting with unfamiliar recipes when so many of your family’s favorites, including soups, main dishes and salads are already Pesach friendly?

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Dear Rachel, 

This year, just as my children were eagerly anticipating the Chanukah gifts they would be receiving, my wife was busy contemplating a beautiful vase she had just received from an acquaintance, whom we occasionally have over for dinner.

When I questioned her preoccupation with the gift, (she was turning it this way and that, as though expecting something to fall out of it), she said she was pretty sure it had been re-gifted (meaning the giver had received it from someone else and had decided for whatever reason to give it away). My wife says it should have had some sort of sticker at the bottom and that the box it was wrapped in did not fit properly.

I didn’t see a problem if it was re-gifted, but my wife seemed to take it as though someone had unloaded an unwanted item on her.

All of this recalled an incident that occurred when I was about twelve years old. We lived in Montreal, Quebec and had baruch Hashem a wonderful childhood — notwithstanding the anti-Semitism in the neighborhood, being children affected by the holocaust syndrome and at the mercy of somewhat broken-down, battle-weary rabbis trying to teach us the art of frumkeit. Yet, all in all it was a normal life.

Erev Pesach came around and my aunt and cousins would be coming over for the Sedorim. (My uncle had passed away at a very young age, leaving his wife and children to fend for themselves.) They would always bring us presents; nothing elaborate, just a gift, like some new toy. But the mere expectation was delightful.

We were taking our forced afternoon Erev Pesach nap (in order to be able to stay up for the Seder) when the bell rang. We knew the presents were here. But this time around they brought me a toy that I remember being disappointed in. I never even opened the packaging and placed it in a drawer in my room.

Weeks later a close friend had a birthday coming up and I thought, “Hey, why not re-gift? It’s still in the original packaging; he will love it.” Meanwhile my young mind was rationalizing: if he will love it, if it is a cool fun toy, then why was I disappointed enough to reject it?

There I was, holding the gift in my hand, questioning my great idea to give it away and wondering if maybe I should keep it for myself. I guess it was a two-fold lesson: one, that we should appreciate everything – especially gifts, and two, that giving to someone was a great feeling and the right thing to do.

I tried explaining this to my wife. To get a gift, I reasoned, to truly appreciate it and to thank the person giving it to you is first and foremost, but then to be so selfless as to be able to give to another, now that is a beautiful thing.

Sure, it may seem callous to give away a gift someone gave you, so each scenario should be examined on its own merit; after all, you don’t want to be offending anyone who might see it as a lack of appreciation. So how do we make one another appreciate the fact that it’s the actual giving and receiving that is the real gift, and that loving the vase or toy or car seat warmer is secondary?

Sometimes it is nobler to re-gift if you do so to make someone happy, especially if that person is having a rough life, G-d forbid, and is in need of some TLC. This then becomes the power of friendship and chesed and true appreciation of the act of giving, not the actual utilization of the gift.

I say rise to the occasion and re-gift. (My wife still has this look on her face that says I haven’t convinced her.)

Better to give than to receive  

Dear Better,

It is the giver’s pretense of having gone to the trouble and expense of buying something for the specific occasion that makes the recipient uneasy. When realization dawns that the present is a re-gifted one, the personal element falls away and the receiver is left feeling as your wife does — that she was used as a receptacle for the disposal of another’s undesired item.

Weren’t you, as a 12-year old, about to do the same when you instinctively reached for the gift you felt you had no use for, which had been left to languish in a drawer? It was only when you anticipated your friend’s excitement at receiving it that you had second thoughts about its value.

Nonetheless, your argument is a convincing one. A gift should be considered as precisely that – a gift. It’s not an item asked for or earned, and the recipient should appreciate and acknowledge the giver’s generosity. After all is said and done, if someone were to give me something of theirs that they know I’ve admired and would love to own, I’d certainly be touched.

How Is This Night Different?

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

We were making good time on Erev Pesach. The back of our car was packed with coolers filled with homemade foods for the Seder – savory Moroccan gefilte fish balls, sweet and sour turkey balls, and trays of delicious baked goods.

My husband’s white kittel lay atop our suitcases, together with the afikomen toys for our grandchildren. Everything felt just right.

Then we heard the sound.

This was the kind of sound that didn’t belong to our car, and it sounded expensive. My husband and I looked at one another and tacitly agreed to ignore it. Less than an hour further down I-95, a second sound joined the first one. This one was a bit scarier, as it was accompanied by a seizing, jerking sensation.

Traffic was dense and swift. A green and yellow eighteen-wheeler was bearing down on us just as we began to lose velocity. An hour outside Baltimore, I yelled at my husband to pull unto the shoulder – and the eighteen-wheeler just missed us.

We each murmured a prayer of gratitude as we called for roadside assistance. My husband’s knuckles were white.

Along that stretch of I-95, there are only two main rest stops. Was it a coincidence that we broke down one mile from the Chesapeake House? We couldn’t stay where we were, as it was far too dangerous. But how would we hobble across four lanes of speeding traffic?

I whispered another prayer. My husband looked up and saw that the highway was free of traffic. There was no traffic in sight! Could this be? We limped across all four lanes to the rest stop before the traffic resumed. How marvelous! I was giddy with wonder.

We pulled into our safe haven and unloaded everything. Laughing, we realized that we must have looked like two immigrants on a landing dock. The only thing we were missing was a featherbed.

The flatbed truck pulled out of the parking lot with our crippled car, headed back to Philadelphia. The sky was foreboding. The forecasted storm was gathering momentum. With the first raindrops falling, our son-in-law soon arrived to rescue us.

With a strong hand and an outstretched arm.

Miracles still happen!

Tenfold

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

It was Erev Pesach, three hours before Yom Tov. I was at the checkout counter at the local supermarket. The gentleman in front of me was trying to pay his $48 bill. I noticed that he gave the clerk a credit card that was declined. He offered a second credit card, with the same result. The saleswoman then asked the young man how he planned to pay, to which he sheepishly replied, “May I write a check?”

“Oh,” she answered, “you’ll have to take that up with the manager.”

As soon as he walked away, I turned to the saleswoman and offered her a $50 bill, and said, “Let me pay his bill and run out.”

Perplexed, she asked, “Are you sure?”

“Yes,” I responded. “I’d like to leave quickly, and please don’t say a word about it.”

As I was leaving, I overheard the customer saying, “The manager will let me use a check this time.”

The saleswoman responded, “Don’t bother. Take your groceries and have a great holiday. It’s already been paid for.”

The last words I heard as I flew out the door were, “Who paid for it?”

I arrived home, happy that I had been able to do a little mitzvah. When I told my wife the story, she responded, “That was a very thoughtful idea, and a nice mitzvah for Yom Tov.”

During the first day of Chol HaMoed, I happened to step into a newspaper store to buy a lottery ticket. When I scratched the ticket, I won $500.

“Mah Gadlu Ma’asecha, Hashem – How great are Your works, Hashem.”

I recently walked into the supermarket again, and was approached by the same saleswoman.

“By the way, were you the one who paid the $50 for our customer?”

I hesitatingly said yes.

She beamed and replied, “That young gentleman left us a check for you.”

I took the check and mailed it back in a plain envelope with a written note.

“Thank you, but I have already been paid back tenfold. But please do me a favor. If you ever come across someone in a similar situation, please help him.”

As it says, the world is like a great wheel, where everything we do returns to us. It’s just a matter of time.

Countdown to Pesach: The Changeover and Final Cleaning

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

This is the final cleaning phase and your vacuum cleaner is going to be running all week long! Go over all the bedrooms, living spaces, offices, the dining room, kitchen – every possible area that needs to be vacuumed.

 

Begin to prepare and cook foods that you prefer refrigerating rather than freezing.

 

Prepare seder plate items. Don’t save this for the day of the first Seder. I promise your Erev Pesach will be much more relaxed if you don’t!

 

Set up guest areas and set you seder table.

 

Most of all – have a spiritually uplifting chag!

 

Here are two great recipes to add to your Passover collection:

 

Crispy Rainbow Trout

 

This was my grandfather’s recipe. We used to beg him for this delicacy every time we’d go to his house for lunch. One day I arrived early and actually caught him cooking his famous trout. I honor him for making something so simple. He figured out what you don’t need to do-add too many ingredients to hide a good thing. “This is it?” I asked. It wasn’t that the method was so complicated; it was that the fish was so fresh-possibly the best fish I had ever tasted.

 

   At the time, as a child, it seemed to me that there should have been a lot of magic and secret ingredients. But that was it – fresh fish.

 

Prep: 5 min Total: 10 min Yield: 6 servings

 

Ingredients:

6 rainbow trout fillets, about 3 pounds 1-1/2 teaspoons salt 3/4 teaspoon coarse black pepper 4-1/2 teaspoons paprika 4 tablespoons olive oil

 

Preparation:

Preheat broiler. Spray a broiler pan with non-stick cooking spray.

Rinse trout and pat dry. Arrange fillets in prepared pan.

Season with salt, pepper and paprika. Drizzle olive oil over fish.

Broil for 5 minutes or until slightly brown and crispy at edges. Place trout on a platter and serve immediately.

 

Italian Zucchini

 

Prep: 10 min Total: 25 min Yield: 4 servings

 

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, coarsely chopped 2 zucchini, thinly sliced 2 teaspoons prepared crushed garlic (substitute frozen or dried garlic powder)1/2 teaspoon crumbled, dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper

 

Preparation:

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

Add onion and saut? 2 minutes.

Add zucchini, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper, and saut? for 3 minutes.

Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

 

Tips: For more flavor and pizzazz, saut? a carton of fresh sliced mushrooms and some red bell pepper strips. Add to zucchini and then season with a little extra garlic, oregano, salt and pepper to taste.

 

 

Ambrosia Soup

This is a non-traditional variation on classic ambrosia. It looks fabulous presented in a glass bowl and ladled out at the table. I like to serve it as a fruity sidekick to rich chocolate desserts.

 

Prep: 8 min Total: 2 hrs, 8 min Yield: 8 servings

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

2 (8-ounce) containers non-dairy frozen ready-to-whip liquid topping, thawed 1 (4-ounce) can mandarin oranges, drained 1 (12-ounce) container frozen strawberries in sauce, thawed 1 (15-ounce) can pineapple tidbits, drained 1 (15-ounce) can sliced peaches, drained, cut into bite-sized pieces 1/2 cup coconut flakes

Sliced mango, cut into bite-sized pieces

 

Preparation:

Place topping, oranges, strawberries and sauce, pineapple, mango and peaches in a large glass bowl. Stir gently.

 

Chill in refrigerator for 2 hours.

 

Sprinkle coconut flakes on top. Serve.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/countdown-to-pesach-the-changeover-and-final-cleaning/2010/03/24/

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