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December 4, 2016 / 4 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘living’

Shiloh Musings: “Strategic Advantage” like Living with a Disease

Sunday, October 9th, 2016

For decades already, basically since the 1973 Yom Kippur War, successive American governments have promised to “help” the State of Israel by assuring us “Strategic Advantage” over our neighboring enemies.

That is how Nixon and Kissinger supported, sic, Israel during that war. Their aim was to allow Israel a victory without its truly defeating Egypt and Syria. They wanted Israel to be fully dependent on American aid/support without its being destroyed/defeated. This was the first time Israel had fought a war for survival with any sort of foreign ally. Our 1967 Six Days War’s victory was ours and ours alone, with the help of Gd and the Jewish People all over the world.

Israel’s tragic mistake, which we’re still paying for, is not acting like a victor should. We didn’t fully accept the surrender of the Arabs in 1967. We’ve been attempting to negotiate “peace” ever since, which just makes us look weak and act weak.

That’s why Egypt and Syria thought they had a chance to defeat us just six years after their defeat. This yearning for peace makes us appear weak, which isn’t an illusion. That’s why the State of Israel has been accepting the fork-tongued assistance and aid from America. The latest package/deal from Obama is the actualization of the Nixon-Kissinger plan. The conditions for Israel’s acceptance of the aid, sic, buy-in-America shopping coupons is the weakening of the Israeli military industries, which makes Israel even more dependent on the USA.

“Strategic Advantage” does not give Israel the ability to fight our enemies into submission. We can only “slap it” and if we need more weapons, it is only with American approval/permission. They not only hold the purse-strings, they have the keys to the factories. 

If you liken our enemies to a “cancer,” this is very much like those who have been told by their doctors that the best scene scenario is “living with cancer” which can be controlled by periodic or frequent doses of chemo, just enough to keep the cancer from growing and not enough to kill the patient.

It’s one thing when you have no choice, as in certain types of cancer, but we do have a choice. This American so-called aid is also an addiction. Withdrawal may be painful for a period of time, but afterwards the body will recover and be healthy.

The Jewish People have just celebrated the beginning of the new year, 5777. It is time for us to take charge of our fate, continued existence. Gd will help us if we take the right steps.

Gmar Chatimah Tovah
May We Be Sealed in the Book of Life
Batya Medad

Poll: Israelis More Troubled by Cost of Living than War

Sunday, October 2nd, 2016

For openers, according to the new survey conducted by Prof. Camil Fuchs on behalf of Walla, with a representative sample of 646 respondents, (542 Jews, 104 Arabs), 56% of the respondents consider the life in Israel to be very good, on the eve of the new year 5777. 40% said it was “mediocre,” and only one percent said their life was “very bad.” The Jewish and Arab data on this question are very similar.

Nevertheless, despite this rosy picture, 23% of the Jewish respondents have considered leaving the country, compared with 77% who said they did not entertain this option. Only 13% of the Arab respondents admitted that they weighed the possibility of immigrating.

The new survey reveals a new trend in the Israeli public — despite the “wave of terror” that began a little over a year ago, only 24% of Israelis agree that security is the most serious problem faced by the country. 36% suggested the cost of living was more worrisome, and 17% believe political corruption is Israel’s biggest problem.

Israelis do not view peace with the Arabs in the PA or in Gaza as a realistic possibility. 64% believe there will never be peace between Israel and the Arabs of Judea and Samaria or Gaza, and the 24% who say it could happen do not expect it in the next five years. A mere 4% say peace is around the corner, and will be here in less than five years.

When asked who are the highest functioning public servants today, the respondents came up  with the following top 10 list (10 points being the best, 0 the worst):

1. Health Minister Yakov Litzman (United Torah Judaism) — 6.71

2. IDF Chief of Staff Gadi Eizenkot — 6.7

3. President Reuven Rivlin — 6.2

4. Justice Minister (and JNi’s Woman of the Year) Ayelet Shaked (Habayit Hayehudi) — 5.9

5. Police Commissioner Roni Alsheich — 5.8

6. Education Minister and Habayit Hayehudi Chairman Naftali Bennett — 5.7

7. Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (Kulanu) — 5.4

8. Culture and Sport Minister Miri Regev (Likud) — 5.3

8. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (Likud) — 5.3

10. Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman (Yisrael Beiteinu) — 5.2

Among the Arab respondents, MK Ahmad Tibi (United Arab List) received the highest score, 7.7, ahead of his Knesset faction’s Chairman Ayman Odeh who scored 7.1.

JNi.Media

Soul Talk – The Art of Living in the Now! [audio]

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

Time is one of those factors that we are all aware of as a reality in our life, but how much do we really understand it? Is time real or a perception? Why is it that sometimes that time seems to pass so quickly, at other times so slowly? How does the Torah explain the concept of time? Finally, within my day to day life, how can I more fully live in the now instead of getting stuck in the past or thinking to much about the future? Join Rabbi David Aaron and Leora Mandel on Soul Talk to get learn the art of living in the NOW! We welcome your questions and e-mails: soultalk@israelnewstalkradio.com

Israel News Talk Radio

Hungarian Neo-Nazis Vandalize Holocaust Protest ‘Living Memorial’

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

The Living Memorial, a monument in Budapest’s Liberty Square, was vandalized over the weekend, after a call by the neo-Nazi website Kuruc.info to destroy it, the website Hungarian Free Press reported Sunday. The Living Memorial was erected back in 2014 in protest against the monument to the German occupation erected by the government, which deflects Hungary’s responsibility for the Holocaust and pins it solely on the Germans.

An estimated 600,000 Hungarian Jews perished in the Holocaust.

For more than two years, the Living Memorial has served as a site for regular talks, lectures, discussion groups, musical performances and commemorations.

One Alitea Guzmán wrote on Kuruc.info: “I promise that one night, in the beginning of September, I will walk by the Living Memorial and I will pack up four or five kilograms of  the display, which legally is considered to be garbage, into a strong bag. And putting that into my car, I will take it to where it belongs. Naturally, I won’t dump it into the Danube, because that is already very polluted.”

Now, as promise, hundreds of photographs which were on display at the site have been torn up and other memorabilia items which had been added to the Living Memorial by survivors and descendants of survivors have been destroyed or stolen.

The Living Memorial group issued a statement saying, “With the exception of a few smaller incidents, respect towards the victims of the Holocaust always protected the memorial from the worst attacks. But yesterday something happened, which until now nobody dared to commit.”

According to the Hungarian Free Press, the Living Memorial group filed a police report immediately after the attack on the monument. The activists noted that Liberty Square is well-equipped with CCTV cameras, so police should be able to identify the perpetrators. But they also revealed that they “do not expect any meaningful response from the state.”

JNi.Media

Health & Living: August 2016

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Jewish Press Staff

Earning A Living: The Great Life Test

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

“Who feeds you manna in the wilderness, which your forefathers knew not, in order to afflict you and in order to test you to do good for you in the end?” – Devarim 8:16

 

For forty years living in the midbar, the Jewish people ate mon. The Torah explains that one of the reasons the mon was given to the Klal Yisrael was in order to test them. The Sforno explains the test: “Will you do His will when He gives you your sustenance easily without pain?”

It seems the Sforno is telling us that the fact that the Jewish nation didn’t have to work was one of the great trials it faced.

This Sforno is very difficult to understand. We know that Hashem metes out many life tests. But where have we seen that not having to struggle is a challenge?

This question can be answered by focusing on why Hashem wants man to work. The ox was created to plow, the donkey to haul loads, the beaver to dam streams. But, man was created for a very different purpose. Man was not created to be a beast of burden. So, why does Hashem want man to work for a living?

One of the reasons can be best understood with a mashol. Imagine that a man recognizes his eight-year-old son has difficulty getting along with his peers. The little boy is constantly getting into fights, and in general seems to miss social cues. The school psychologist tells the father his son has social integration issues. He just doesn’t understand the rules of social conduct.

The father takes it on himself to help his little Moishe become a mensch. As part of the plan, he takes time off from work and invites Moishe and his friends to a play date. They are on the floor playing Monopoly when an ambulance passes outside, siren blasting. As the boys look to the window, the father notices Moishe reach into the “bank” and take out a five-hundred-dollar bill. The father doesn’t say anything. A few moments later, the doorbell rings. Again, all the boys look up, and Moishe reaches into the box and takes out two thousand dollars. When this happens again a few moments later, the father asks Moishe to join him in the kitchen.

“Moishe,” says the father, “I couldn’t help but notice that some of the money that belongs in the bank somehow ended up in your pocket. Can you explain this to me?”

“Sure,” Moishe answers. “Last night I heard you and mommy talking about how you need a lot of money. So here, I took this for you!”

While the sincerity of the little fellow might be touching, he is missing the point. The only reason the father was involved in this activity was to teach him how to be a mensch. The father doesn’t need the money, and certainly isn’t taking time off of his busy day to earn Monopoly money. But Moishe in his naiveté missed the entire point of the exercise.

This is an apt mashol to man working. Hashem doesn’t need man to work to earn a living. Hashem has lots of money. Hashem created the situation that man has to work to earn his daily bread. Now man is dependent. Now man can go through one of the greatest of life’s tests: how will he go about this activity called earning a living? Will he be honest? Will he be ethical? When he has difficulty in earning a living, will he learn to trust in Hashem, or will he make that ultimate mistake – thinking it is the sweat of his brow and the strength of his hand that earns him his bread?

Man Needs Needs

This seems to be the answer to the Sforno. The generation of the midbar was on a lofty level. They had received the Torah from Hashem and were living in a virtual yeshiva. While the mon took care of their daily needs, it was also as a great social experiment: would they attain the same closeness to Hashem without having to earn a living? Would they still reach out to Hashem if they didn’t lack for anything? Would they still come to recognize their dependence on Hashem if they didn’t need to struggle to survive? The mon was a test to see if they could reach greatness without the normal life settings – without needs.

Rabbi Ben Tzion Shafier

Anne Bloch: The Passion For Living

Monday, July 18th, 2016

How can one define this slim, diminutive ninety-year-old lady? An artist, English and music teacher, devoted mother, talented singer, and social activist?

Anne Bloch’s unique character began at birth. She was born to young Hebrew teachers, Eve and Noah Averbuch, whose Zionist aspirations drove them to leave their families in their Lithuanian birthplace and make aliyah to Mandatory Palestine in the early 1920s. Anne Averbuch Bloch was born in Tel Aviv in 1926, her birth certificate stating that she is a Palestinian.

When Anne was two years old, her parents, finding it difficult to provide for a growing family, were compelled to immigrate to South Africa. Anne grew up in Cape Town where the teachers in the local Jewish school recognized her exceptional talent and creativity at an early age.

She soon became known as an artist whose exhibitions were greatly admired. One of her admirers was a young student of medicine, Archie Bloch, a devoted Zionist. The two were soon engaged, with a major condition on the groom’s side – Anne would have to agree to move to the Land of Israel, which in the interim became the State of Israel.

The passionate artist was bursting with joy as they stepped ashore in Ashkelon to build their family’s future in her own birthplace, now the brand new Jewish State. Dr. Archie Bloch became the founder of Barzilai Hospital, and Anne, the devoted mother of three daughters, each a delightful spark in her new life.

Initially, before the establishment of Barzilai Hosptal, Dr. Bloch pioneered the mother and baby clinics in the Western Negev’s immigrant towns such as Sderot, Ashkelon and the moshavim.

In time, Anne became the center of Ashkelon’s world of art. She branched out from painting with oil and acrylic, to creating masterpieces from fabrics of all kind, wall hangings, dolls, and an endless variety of hats.

When her children grew older, she taught art to children and English through songs with infectious enthusiasm.

Her home, her kitchen and salon are a gallery of her paintings that include themes of nature – especially trees – collages, wall hangings, life-size dolls using every material imaginable and hats.

A review of an exhibition called “Lama Kova” (Why a Hat?) at Hankin Museum in Holon in 2006 describes her “colorful creations with humor and fantasy…” The pièce de résistance however, is a wall hanging inspired by her mother’s saying Money doesn’t grow on trees. Anne’s interpretation is a large wall hanging of a tree with green and silver leaves, and attached to each leaf is a silver lira, no longer in circulation as a monetary unit!

Today, at age ninety, Anne Bloch volunteers at a school, teaching the next generation the joy of art and music and a passion for living.

Prof. Livia Bitton-Jackson

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/jewess-press/impact-women-history/anne-bloch-the-passion-for-living/2016/07/18/

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