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November 26, 2015 / 14 Kislev, 5776
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Posts Tagged ‘Nazi salute’

Queen’s Nazi Salute Rattles Edward’s Skeleton in Buckingham Closet [video]

Monday, July 20th, 2015

It may not be often that tabloids come across historical photos and films, but it seems that The Sun has done just that with its release of a chilling, 17 second film of England’s Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, Princess Margaret and Edward VIII, giving the camera the Nazi salute.

The Sun insists its aim was not to insult a sitting monarch, since the girl who would become Elizabeth II is only six or seven years old in the footage, and is merely imitating what Edward, then the Prince of Wales, was teaching her to do, but it raises the specter of the Windsor family’s haunted past, particularly Edward’s Nazi sympathies.

The grainy film was shot in 1933 or 1934, when Hitler had risen to power, and had been stored in an archive for decades. Buckingham Palace reacted with a dismayed public statement over the release of the clip, which they consider exploitative. They also raised questions as to how the film clip got into the hands of The Sun, since it was in the archives and was the property of the royals.

Stig Abell, managing editor of The Sun, defended his decision to print the film, telling the BBC, “I think the justification is relatively evident–it’s a matter of national, historical significance to explore what is going on in the 30s ahead of the Second World War. We’re very clear we’re not, of course, suggesting anything improper on the part of the Queen.”

The film the Sun used was a copy, according to the Sun, and the original remains locked in the palace archives.

King George VI and his wife, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later to be known as The Queen Mother), raised the morale of Britons during the Nazi air raids on London, and so it is unlikely viewers would come away with the suspicion that the future queen harbored Nazi sympathies. Hitler’s rise to power was meteoric, and the characteristic hand salute might have been seen as something “trendy,” without the suspicion of the destruction and genocide the Nazis would perpetrate. Also apparent in the film is that the motivation for the salute is coming from the Prince of Wales, who would become King Edward VIII for less than a year, in 1936.

Prince Edward is seen with his sister-in-law the Queen Mother and her children playing with corgies on the grounds of Blamoral. Prince Edward lifts his arm in a Nazi salute, then the Queen Mother follows, and finally, Elizabeth. The others repeat the gesture, with 3 year old Margaret briefly lifting her arm in a semi-salute.

Dr. Karina Urbach, Senior Research Fellow at the University of London Institute of Historical Research, said that, given Prince Edward’s well-documented Nazi sympathies, it appears in the film he is quite intentionally teaching the children the Nazi salute.

Juliet Gardner, another Research Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research said, “It’s an insight into British attitudes at that time in 1933, long before anyone realized Hitler’s designs on Europe. It is absolutely right that the public sees it.”

The Star also rattled the Nazi skeleton in Windsor family closet a decade ago, when it published a photo of a 20-year old Prince Harry, third in line for the British throne, wearing a desert Nazi uniform and a swastika armband, at a friend’s birthday party. The theme of the party was colonialism, and Harry’s brother William made the much more diplomatic choice of dressing up like a lion.

Jewish groups were incensed, particularly given the proximity of the event to the 60th commemoration ceremony of the liberation of Auschwitz.

A spokesman for the Board of Deputies of British Jews said at the time, “It’s no joke to dress up as a Nazi, especially as we come up to the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. It is important that everyone remembers the evil the Nazis were responsible for.”

Jewish and veterans’ groups accepted Harry’s apology–he expressed regret for causing offense and said “it was a poor choice of costume,” but then Tory leader Michael Howard said Prince Harry should have offered the apology in person.

Edward VIII’s Nazi sympathies were hardly a secret, although this new clip is the first photograph of him giving a Nazi salute; it was known he saluted Hitler when the two met, in 1937.

Edward was the son of King George V and Queen Mary, and his father despaired of his son’s dissolute and irresponsible ways. Prince Edward was known for being a womanizer, and his disinclination to conform to the royal rules was the reason he abdicated in 1936, after which he became the Duke of Windsor. During his short reign, he caused a constitutional crisis by marrying the twice divorced American Wallis Simpson. The marriage conflicted with his role as titular head of the Church of England, because, at the time, the church forbade remarriage of a divorced person whose ex spouse was still alive.

Less than a year after his abdication, the Duke of Windsor and the Duchess met with Adolph Hitler. It was believed that the Duke was favoring fascism over Communism and might even seek an alliance with a Germany to pursue Russia. It is believed that Hitler wanted to reinstate the Duke of Windsor as king and Albert Speer quoted Hitler as saying the abdication made things harder for the Nazis: “I am certain through him, permanent, friendly relations could have been achieved. If he had stayed, everything would have been different. His abdication was a severe loss for us.”

The Duke and Duchess of Windsor traveled throughout Europe until 1940, when Prime Minister Winston Churchill was notified that the Duke was possibly involved in Nazi intelligence and might have been giving away military secrets.

Churchill threatened the Duke with a court martial if he failed to return to Britain, and later made him governor of the Bahamas. Serving in that capacity, Edward despaired of having to deal with “negros” who “seem unable to rise to prominence without losing their equilibrium.”

He blamed labor unrest on “mischief makers–communists–men of Central European Jewish descent who had secured jobs on a pretext of obtaining deferment of draft.”

Even as late as 1941, Edward said, “Hitler is the right and logical leader of the German People,” although he later claimed he had been misquoted.

According to the Daily Mail, Edward did say that “Hitler was not such a bad chap.”

Greek Island Police Chief Photographed Giving Nazi Salute

Monday, September 8th, 2014

The police chief of the popular Greek tourist island of Hydra was photographed giving the Nazi salute while on a trip to Germany.

The Ethnos Sunday newspaper published the picture of Lt. Yiorgos Kagkalos, which it reported was taken in 2011 during a visit to the Nuremberg Transport Museum.

The publication follows persistent reports suggesting widespread support among the Greek police for the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party. It also comes in a week when the Greek Parliament is working to pass a law that would outlaw Holocaust denial and hate speech.

In the photo, Kagkalos is standing in front of a red locomotive emblazoned with the Nazi eagle and swastika. His arm is raised in the Nazi salute.

The newspaper reported that the photo had been sent anonymously to the police who investigated the incident, but ultimately did not charge Kagkalos due to lack of evidence.

Kagkalos has appealed to the administrative courts an order by police headquarters to remove him from his position, which he has held since 2011, the newspaper reported.

British Soccer Watchdog Punishes Player for Quenelle Salute

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Nicolas Anelka, a French soccer player for a British club, was fined $130,000 and suspended five games for performing the quenelle gesture in a game.

The British Football Association handed down its penalties on Thursday following an investigation by an independent regulatory commission, which ruled that Anelka was guilty of performing an act that was “abusive and/or indecent and/or insulting and/or improper” after scoring against West Ham on Dec. 28. Anelka, a striker for the West Bromwich team, also must attend an educational program.

The punishment is suspended pending a seven-day appeals process.

Anelka, the commission determined, had not been deliberately anti-Semitic in making the gesture, nor did he intend “to express or promote anti-Semitism by his use of the quenelle.” But the panel said his breach was an aggravated one because it “included a reference to ethnic origin and/or race and/or religion or belief.”

The player said in December that he performed the quenelle as a gesture to his friend Dieudonne M’bala M’bala, the French comedian who popularized the quasi-Nazi salute. Dieudonne, who has been fined repeatedly for making anti-Semitic remarks, says the quenelle is neither anti-Semitic nor Nazi but merely anti-establishment. France’s interior minister, Manuel Valls, is among many who see the gesture as anti-Semitic.

Leaders of British Jewry, including Vivian Wineman, president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, welcomed the ruling as justified and fitting.

David Delew, chief executive of the Community Security Trust, the British Jewish community’s watchdog on anti-Semitism, said in a statement, “This verdict sends a strong message to Jewish players and supporters at all levels of the game that the Football Association will act against anti-Semitic acts if they are reported.”

The ‘Quenelle’: Product of Simple Hatred or Ignorance?

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

The “quenelle” craze that took over France and a few other European countries in the last few months is not merely the product of hate but rather one of sheer ignorance. Although both seem to correlate, historically at least, there is an important distinction that needs to be made.

Ignorance is what leads to blind hate. Whether that hate is justified or not is dependent on the individual, however there is without a doubt a relationship between ignorance and a lack of justification of one’s hate. Wait what?

The question is if the individuals who are frivolously displaying these signs on football fields and in front of Shoah museums are aware of what they are doing. Are they participating in a abhorrent furor of hatred, or are they-in their ignorance- trying to fit in a cultural fad?

Surely every time we see a new picture on social networking sites or a news source, the people who show off their “quenelle” in photos are either bemused or straight up laughing. Is it a sign of hatred? Or simply just someone trying to fit in?

Unfortunately it is both. By trying to fit in a racist, yet in their view, humorous show of body language they are not just trying to confirm into social norms that their peers and culture are exhibiting, they are consciously or even unconsciously exhibiting hate. You might be wondering: so what?

Are there no historical similarities? The formation of the fascist party led by Benito Mussolini in Italy displayed and vulgarized the use of the Roman Salute to move the masses. Let alone the use of the infamous Nazi Salute that has become one of the most overt representations of hatred. How about the use of the Japanese salute under Hirohito’s despotic regime? Is there no common affinity to the “quenell”? Something that binds all of these together?

Conformity. By displaying signs whether one knows why or not, builds a culture of complacency, ignorance and hatred. Especially when connected to the eternal and universal fact of trying to “fit in” or “be a part of something” in human nature, no matter at what cost. Even if it means the hatred of others for the purpose of finding one’s place in the cultural hegemony- the masses.

The “quenelle” is more than just a cultural fad, and it is more than just a representation of French anti-semitism. It is a form of language, I dare say, a mechanism by which hatred is not just spread but rather it is normalized in the minds of individuals. The more it becomes placed in mass culture and media the more it has become normal to see it. Not so different how by 1941, the Hitler Salute was absolutely embedded in all fabrics of daily life- it was everywhere.

Yet the gesture’s promoters say it is for comical means, to break down social conventions, and to promote free speech. Dieudonne himself who has been banned from performing in various French cities, and from entering the U.K has claimed that it was only a part of his “routine”. Really?

Is that why in 2009 in a political campaign promoting Anti-Zionism under the headline of “Pour Une Europe Libérée”- For A “Free Europe”, Dieudonné poses showing of his famous sign. Again immediately comparable to any National Socialist poster from the 1930’s. This leads me to the next question, in fact to a set of questions.

Does this gesture work to promote hatred and more ignorance, or is it just a display of the current anti-semitism in France? Maybe Both? And more importantly, do people stretch their right hand down pointing to the ground because they hate something, or because they are following their peers blindly-as ignorance dictates? These two things are not mutually exclusive, they seem to function together in a complexity so vigorous as to influence culture and to make people hate whether they actually do or don’t.

Air France Employees Performed Quenelle Salute

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

Three Air France union officials “joyfully” performed the Quenelle reverse Nazi salute at a rally last November but not reported until this week by the French Liberation newspaper.

Air France management issued a statement condemning the salute, according to the European Jewish Press, which reported they were “extremely shocked” and promise ”to take appropriate actions,” whatever that means.

The quenelle was popularized by French anti-Semitic comedian, so he calls himself, Dieudonne.

David Ricatte, secretary and spokesman of the CGT-Air France Communist union, defended his performing the salute and claimed it has no racial or religious significance. He argued that it was a fashionable anti-establishment sign until it was publicized in December as anti-Semitic

“However, earlier in January, Ricatte posted on his personal Twitter account a dubbed version of the scene of Adolf Hitler in ‘Downfall’ in which Hitler is a parodied version of French Interior Minister Manuel Valls condemning the quenelle,” EJP reported.

French Jewish Leader Softens Stance on Quenelle Gesture

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

The president of France’s main Jewish group has toned down his blanket condemnation of the quenelle gesture and said it is not necessarily anti-Semitic.

Roger Cukierman of the CRIF umbrella group adjusted his position in a filmed interview published Tuesday on the website of the Le Figaro daily.

Reacting to the decision that day by England’s Football Association to punish Nicolas Anelka, a French soccer player who performed the gesture during a match, Cukierman said, “It seems to me a bit severe because it seems to me that this gesture has an anti-Semitic connotation, which would be reprehensible, only when performed in front of a synagogue or a Holocaust memorial site.”

But when performed at a place “without any Jewish connection, it seems to me like an anarchist gesture against the establishment, which, it seems, does not merit severe punishment,” he said.

Anelka posted the Le Figaro video of Cukierman on Twitter with the message: “Nothing to add.”

On Tuesday, the Football Association announced that Anelka faces a ban of at least five matches for improper conduct, aggravated because it “included a reference to ethnic origin and/or race and/or religion or belief” for performing the gesture on the pitch after scoring a goal on Dec. 28.

On Dec. 26, Cukierman was quoted by Le Point and on CRIF’s website as saying, “We are very concerned by the impact of this gesture, which we consider a Nazi salute.”

The quenelle was invented by Dieudonne M’bala M’bala, an anti-Semitic comedian. Earlier in December, CRIF requested and received a special audience with President Francois Hollande to discuss the quenelle and other actions by Dieudonne.

On Dec. 31, French Interior Minister Manuel Valls said at a news conference, “This gesture is a gesture of hatred, it’s an anti-Semitic gesture and all those who perform it should know — they can’t deny knowledge — that they are performing an anti-Semitic gesture, an inverted Nazi gesture.”

French Soldiers Face Disciplinary Action for Anti-Semitic Photo

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

Two French soldiers who posed in front of a Paris synagogue a few weeks ago while making an anti-Semitic gesture will be sanctioned by the French army.

The soldiers of the Alpine Hunters elite unit currently are the subject of an investigation, the French military’s spokesperson, Bruno Louisfert, told radio station RTL France Tuesday. He said they will be punished for the act.

Louisfert said that they posed for the photograph in front of the entrance door to the Beth David synagogue with their left hand placed on their right shoulder and their right hand extended over their right thigh.

Dubbed the “quenelle,” the gesture is the brainchild of the anti-Semitic comedian Dieudonne, who invented several anti-Semitic words and gestures seen to be too vague to violate France’s law forbidding hate speech and Holocaust denial. The quenelle is thought to echo the Nazi salute.

In an unrelated incident, unidentified vandals caused serious damage to a Jewish school in Marseille in southern France on Tuesday. The same Chabad-affiliated elementary school, Haya Moushka, was targeted in a similar incident three years ago.

Tuesday’s attack left many shattered windows. The school’s toilets also were smashed, along with heating radiators.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/jewish-news/french-soldiers-face-disciplinary-action-for-anti-semitic-photo/2013/09/11/

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