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August 27, 2014 / 1 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘presidential’

More than 20,000 Londoners Hold Munich Moment of Silence

Friday, July 27th, 2012

More than 20,000 people in various venues in London attended the British Zionist Federation’s “Minute for Munich” program that was promoted via social media.

A short memorial service at the Israeli Embassy that was organized by the Zionist Federation was streamed live online Friday, according to the London Jewish Chronicle.

About 200 people marked the Minute for Munich in Trafalgar Square, reciting memorial prayers and lighting memorial candles. Afterwards, they waved British and Israeli flags in front of media covering the event.

“The British Jewish community is showing its solidarity with our brothers and sisters in Israel,” the British Israel Coalition’s Ari Soffer told the crowd, according to the Chronicle. “We should not allow this tragedy to go uncommemorated. This is a time to show our respect and remember the dead.”

The families of the victims of the 1972 Munich massacre, in which 11 Israeli Olympics athletes and coaches were murdered by Palestinian terrorists, have mounted a global campaign to get the International Olympic Committee to hold an official moment of silence at the Games. The IOC continues to reject the call, despite its being endorsed by President Obama, GOP presumptive presidential nominee Mitt Romney, the U.S. Senate, the German Bundestag, the Canadian and Australian parliaments, about 50 members of the British Parliament, the Israeli government and Jewish organizations worldwide.

Choice to Make Love, Not War

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Alternative peace activist Baruch Widen joins Managing Editor of Jewish Press Online,Yishai Fleisher,. Together, they talk about the results of the Presidential election in Egypt and how these results will affect the relationship between Israel and Egypt. Yishai ends the segment by talking about difficulties he personally has faced living among Arabs and how they often make the choice to hate rather than love both Jews and each other.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Few Doubts on Whom Jews Should Pray for to Win Egyptian Runoff Election

Friday, June 15th, 2012

First, in case your Internet was off these past couple of days, Egypt’s High Constitutional Court on Thursday ruled that the Political Disenfranchisement Law was unconstitutional. The court also found the election of one third of parliamentary seats, reserved for individual candidates, unconstitutional. The reason: instead of being genuinely independent, those candidates were heavily affiliated with religious parties.

Then Maher Sami, deputy head of Egypt’s High Constitutional Court, announced that Thursday’s court verdict means that both houses of Egypt’s parliament—the People’s Assembly and the consultative Shura Council—will be dissolved.

So these are not easy, stable times for Israel’s neighbor to the south-west.

But the runoff presidential election between former prime minister Ahmed Shafiq and Freedom and Justice Party leader Mohamed Mursi is still going ahead as planned, on Saturday and Sunday.

And so, as interested parties, we must ask ourselves, which of the two candidates should we say a Mi Sh’Beirach for, or at least endorse in our hearts during prayer this coming Shabbat.

The details of this article were culled from the English language versions of the Arab press, and so, by definition, are already kind of biased. But you get what you can, and you hope that our Arab analysts out there will quickly and surely add a deeper dimension to this note.

Mohamed Mursi is a professor of Engineering. He served as member of parliament until 2005 and was head of the Muslim Brotherhood parliamentary blocback then. He is a top ranking Muslim Brothers official, who came in first in the first round of the presidential elections, with 5,764,952 votes, or 24.78 percent.

Ahmed Shafiq is a lieutenant-general in the army, former minister of civil aviation, and Mubarak’s last prime minister. He resigned after Mubarak stepped down. He finished second in the presidential election first round, with 5,505,327 votes, or 23.66 percent.

Concerns about Mursi are that he will be controlled by the Muslim Brotherhood leadership. He will likely increase the Brotherhood’s clerics’ dominance over all branches of the state, Iran Revolution style. He supports decriminalizing female circumcision, and will not be a friend of career women. There are fears that he will not be an effective bulwark against the extremist SCAF. And, judging by the Brotherhood’s disappointing performance in parliament, Mursi’s ability to rule effectively in a democracy has come under question as well.

Last week, Mursi declared at a Cairo University campaign rally: “The Quran is our constitution, the Prophet is our leader, jihad is our path, and martyrdom in the service of God is our goal. We shall enforce Islamic Sharia, and shall accept no alternative to it.”

Shafiq, on the other hand, appears to be a Western-style democrat – at least compared to Mursi. He favors of an inclusive and progressive civil state, and is against the politicizing of religion. If he wins, he has both the temperament and the experience of suppressing possible subversion on the part of the Brotherhood. And, despite his questionable ties with the Mubarak regime, Egyptian secular revolutionaries will fair much better following a Shafiq victory, because it would give secular parties time to establish themselves and grow politically – if the Brotherhood wins, the secularists will be targetted. And, naturally, economically, Egyptians will benefit greatly from a liberal-leaning presidency.

And Shafiq would probably maintain some  continuity in Egypt’s foreign policy, including its tenuous peace with Israel. When speaking about Egypt’s 1979 peace treaty with Israel, he said, “I object to Israel’s current actions, but I am a man who honors past agreements”.

So, when you daven in shul this Shabbat and you happen to touch on Egypt’s political future, cast your spiritual vote for Ahmed Shafiq.

But don’t tell your Egyptian friends, because that would be his kiss of death…

Adelson Gives Romney PAC $10 Million

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

According to the Wall Street Journal, chairman and chief executive of Las Vegas Sands Corp billionaire Sheldon Adelson, who fueled Newt Gingrich’s presidential bid, is now giving $10 million to the super PAC Restore Our Future, which supports presumptive  GOP nominee Mitt Romney.

It is the largest single donation to Romney’s coffer to date. By law, the independent political action committee is not allowed to coordinate its work with the formal Romney campaign.

Forbes Magazine ranked Adelson among the 10 wealthiest Americans, with more than $20 billion.

Adelson and his wife gave $21 million altogether to a PAC supporting Gingrich during the primaries.

Brushing Up On The Presidents

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

About a decade ago the Monitor recommended a bunch of books on U.S. presidents and the Middle East and then updated the list a few years later. With interest in the 2012 presidential race heating up, another look at the list seems in order.

These are not necessarily the best presidential biographies but are strong in terms of presidential attitudes and policies toward Israel.

Truman, the Jewish Vote and the Creation of Israel by John Snetsinger (Hoover Institute Press, 1974): In-depth account of the struggle for a Jewish state during the first three years of the Truman presidency. Very strong on how the 1948 presidential election influenced U.S. policy.

A Safe Haven by Allis and Ronald Radosh (Harper, 2009): The most recent addition to the Truman/Israel library, the book makes use of newly released documents but is a little too sympathetic to Truman, whose vacillation on the issue of a Jewish state was punctuated by anti-Semitic outbursts.

Eisenhower and the American Crusades by Herbert S. Parmet (Macmillan, 1972): A thorough look at the Eisenhower administration, with considerable attention paid to the Suez Crisis of 1956. Despite its having been written before the release of many classified Eisenhower-era documents, the book has aged well.

“Let Us Begin Anew”: An Oral History of the Kennedy Presidency by Gerald S. and Deborah Hart Strober (Harper-Collins, 1993): Real inside stuff here; the Strobers interviewed dozens of surviving Kennedy-era officials and opinion-makers who spoke candidly and on the record, many for the first time, on the major issues of the day.

Support Any Friend: Kennedy’s Middle East and the Making of the U.S.-Israel Alliance by Warren Bass (Oxford University Press, 2002): A worthwhile read, though Bass gives Kennedy too much credit for the U.S.-Israel partnership that really began to blossom during the Johnson and Nixon years.

Flawed Giant – Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1961-1973 by Robert Dallek (Oxford University Press, 1998): The second and concluding volume of an authoritative biography, with the focus here on Johnson’s vice presidential and presidential years.

Nixon: The Triumph of a Politician, 1962-1972 and Nixon: Ruin and Recovery, 1973-1990 by Stephen E. Ambrose (Simon & Schuster, 1989, 1991): Parts two and three of a magisterial three-volume biography of Nixon, with plenty on the evolution of Nixon’s Mideast views.

Nixon: An Oral History of His Presidency by Gerald S. and Deborah Hart Strober (HarperCollins, 1994): The Strobers do for Nixon’s presidency what they did for Kennedy’s (see fifth entry above).

The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford by John Robert Green (University Press of Kansas, 1995): The definitive history of the Ford administration has yet to appear, but this offers a good examination of the Kissinger-Ford Mideast policy.

The Presidency of James Earl Carter, Jr. by Burton I. Kaufman (University Press of Kansas, 1993): As with Ford, a comprehensive history of the Carter presidency has yet to be written; in the meantime, this account touches on all the important points, with interesting details on the Camp David negotiations.

President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime by Lou Cannon (Simon & Schuster, 1991): A big book by a political reporter who covered Reagan longer than just about anyone else. Reagan: The Man and His Presidency by Gerald S. and Deborah Hart Strober (Houghton Mifflin, 1998): Yet another superb oral history from the Strobers.

George Bush – The Life of a Lone Star Yankee by Herbert S. Parmet (Scribner, 1997): Fair to its subject and rigorously researched, with a detailed account of the Gulf War and the Bush-Baker Mideast policy.

The High Cost of Peace by Yossef Bodansky (Prima, 2002): A smart and informed recounting of how U.S. diplomacy during the administrations of the first President Bush and President Clinton undermined Israel’s security and left the U.S. more vulnerable to Islamic terrorism.

American Presidents, Religion, and Israel: The Heirs of Cyrus by Paul Charles Merkley (Praeger Publishers, 2004): An examination of how the religious backgrounds of American presidents have influenced U.S. foreign policy.

Lost Years by Mark Matthews (Nation Books, 2007): The book’s subtitle – “Bush, Sharon and Failure in the Middle East” – makes the author’s bias clear, but this is a detailed and for the most part objective account of the U.S.-Israel relationship from 2001 through Ariel Sharon’s stroke in 2006.

Thousands Protest Egyptian Election Results, Set Ablaze Establishment Candidate’s HQ

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Thousands gathered overnight in Tahrir Square, Cairo, to demonstrate against Egypt’s election results which will pit deposed ruler Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister Ahmed Shafiq against Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Mursi in a runoff election on June 16 and 17, al Ahram reports.

According to Egypt’s Supreme Presidential Electoral Commission (SPEC) officially announced on Monday the results of the first round, with Mohamed Mursi at the head of the pack with 5,764,952 votes, and Ahmed Shafiq second with 5,505,327 votes.

46.42 per cent of eligible voters participated in the first round.

On Monday night, Shafiq’s presidential campaign headquarters in the upscale Dokki neighborhood in Cairo were ransacked and set on fire.

“They seemed to know what they were after and they went directly to the storage rooms and set them on fire using petrol bombs,” Ahmed Abdel Ghani, 30, a member of Shafiq’s campaign, told Reuters.

The main headquarters villa did not burn, but protesters destroyed computers inside.

Graffiti on the wall outside the villa read: “No to Shafiq, no to feloul” (an Arabic word referring to the “remnants” of Mubarak’s era).

“We are sending a message to the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) that we will never accept Ahmed Shafiq as our next president. He is the second Mubarak and was even in the Air Force like the ousted leader,” Aly, 24, a pharmacist, told al Ahram. “Personally I think the elections were rigged to put Mursi first, as it would have been a crisis if Shafiq was top – but, make no mistake, Shafiq is the military’s man.”

Soon the number of protesters in the square grew to thousands, led by former presidential contender and a left-wing labour lawyer Khaled Ali, who marched to Talaat Harb Square and around downtown Cairo before coming back to Tahrir Square.

“Smash Shafiq on his head,” the marchers chanted, holding Mubarak’s prime minister’s presidential campaign posters upside down with his face crossed out.

Others chanted “Down with the dogs of the military regime” and called on bystanders in balconies to join them.

One protestor held a poster saying “If Shafiq wins, we are all dead.”

Romney to Meet with Jewish Donors

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Mitt Romney is meeting with some 30 major Jewish donors to his presidential campaign as part of a “constituents day.”

The former Massachusetts governor and all-but-certain Republican nominee for president, will meet for about an hour with the donors in Boston on Thursday.

A donor who was invited told JTA that the purpose of the meeting would be an exchange of views.

There would be other meetings the same day with other constituent groups, the donor said, confirming reports of the meeting from a number of Jewish community officials.

Romney and President Obama have intensified outreach to Jewish voters and supporters in this presidential election year.

On Monday, the White House hosted some 70 Jewish leaders in a bid to reassure them that the Obama administration was determined to keep Iran from acquiring a nuclear bomb.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/romney-to-meet-with-jewish-donors/2012/05/24/

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