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December 26, 2014 / 4 Tevet, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘rape’

Nearly 100 Rapes in Four Days of Anti-Morsi Protests

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

Mobs protesting the rule of Mohammed Morsi have sexually assaulted nearly 100 women and raped at least 91  in the last four days of protests, Human Rights Watch reported.

Forty-six attacks took  place on Sunday, 17 on Monday and 43 on Tuesday, according to figures attributed to the Egyptian Operation Anti-Sexual Harassment/Assault, which operates a hotline for victims of sexual assault. The Nazra for Feminist Studies women’s rights group  reported that there were five similar attacks on Friday.

“The government response has been to downplay the extent of the problem or to seek to address it through legislative reform alone” Al Jazeera reported”

Several women required surgery after the attacks and some were beaten with metal chains and were stabbed.

Al Jazeera noted, “Sexual harassment has long been common in Egypt, but its increasing occurrence and ferocity has shaken the protest movement. A large number of women had fallen victim to gang assaults too in the square – the epicenter of 2011 revolution.”

An American television journalist was brutally gang raped in the protests against Hosni Mubarak two years ago.

South Tel Aviv Residents Protest, to Taunts by African Infiltrators and Leftists Enablers

Monday, June 24th, 2013

On Sunday evening, a hundred residents of south Tel Aviv, as well as former MK Michael Ben-Ari, demonstrated in Neve Sha’anan’s Levinsky Park, following the stabbing spree carried out by the illegal African infiltrators that have taken over this section of Tel Aviv.

The protesters claimed that the police have abandoned their neighborhoods, and have not done anything to stop the downward slide that has turned this Tel Aviv neighborhood into the most dangerous place in Israel.

Violence, stabbings, rape, and shootings have become commonplace.

During the protest, police kept thousands of African infiltrators as well as the members of Leftwing activist groups that enable and help these illegal infiltrators, away from the protesters, though that didn’t stop both the infiltrators and activists from jeering and taunting the Tel Aviv residents.

Still, it was probably the most police protection these citizens have received in months.

Radical Islam: The Real Roots of Conflict in the Middle East

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

The international community should focus on the true root of conflict in the Middle East, which is the human rights violations occurring in the Muslim world.

Many world leaders appear to falsely believe that if only the Israeli-Palestinian conflict were solved, all of the problems that presently exist in the Middle East would magically disappear. For this reason, they focus an enormous amount of energy on trying to solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, instead of attempting to halt the democide in Syria; stopping the tyrannical regime in Iran; or pressuring the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood into respecting women’s rights, freedom of speech and minority rights. Yet, even if the Israeli-Palestinian conflict were to end tomorrow, all of these problems that cause much conflict would still exist.

DEMOCIDE IN SYRIA

The situation in Syria is deteriorating by the day. Presently, whether 94,000 or 120,000 Syrians have perished, more Syrians have been killed within the last two years than the total number of causalities from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict between 1948 and 2009. Aside from the horrific death toll, Syrian civilians are getting tortured and raped en masse, while entire population centers are getting leveled to the ground. As a result, many Syrians have been forced to flee their homes. Over 1.6 million Syrians are presently refugees, according to the United Nations. Women and children make up three quarters of the Syrian refugee population, likely because the Syrian regime has resorted to rape as a political tool to oppress the Syrian people. No amount of pressure on Israel to withdraw to the 1967 borders will improve the plight of the people of Syria.

MASS REPRESSION IN IRAN

Iranian woman stoned to death

The present reality in Iran is also atrocious. In a country where adulteresses are routinely stoned to death, female political prisoners are as a matter of policy raped before they are executed, believers in the Bahai faith are denied the right to practice their religion, being gay is viewed to be a capital offense, and the present ruling regime seeks to have nuclear power; Iran remains a problematic state, despite the recent election of pragmatic Islamists to power. Peace negotiations between Mahmoud Abbas and Benjamin Netanyahu would not convince the Iranian leadership to institute democratic reforms and stop their nuclear program in the absence of international pressure.

THE MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD DICTATORSHIP IN EGYPT

Under the Muslim Brotherhood’s tutelage, Egypt is slowly creeping in the direction of becoming another Iran. The Arab Spring there is quickly turning into a dark winter. Since the Muslim Brotherhood has come to power, the Egyptian press is being radicalized, while liberal voices within Egypt are being persecuted. Some Egyptian human rights activists claim that there is no difference between the Muslim Brotherhood and Mubarak when it comes to oppressing dissent. Like in Iran, women and minorities are suffering significantly under Islamist rule.

Anti-Sexual Harassment Protest in Egypt

Sexual harassment and rape within Egypt has worsened under the Muslim Brotherhood, with many of the instances of gender based violence originating with the Muslim Brotherhood itself. Some Egyptian women who have attempted to protest against this phenomenon have been gang raped. Meanwhile, the situation for Egypt’s Jewish and Coptic minorities have also significantly worsened. Copts have gotten massacred since Mubarak fell from power, illustrating that Egypt is not a safe place for Christians, unlike Israel, which is the safest place for Christians in the entire Middle East. The few Jews left in Egypt can’t walk in the streets without getting harassed. Elements of Egyptian society are opposed to Egyptian Jews having minority rights. None of this will change should an historic peace agreement be reached between Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

FOCUS ON ISSUES AT HAND

Members of the international community, instead of focusing on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict with tunnel vision, should take off their blinders and pay attention to the real issues that are causing conflict in the Middle East. These issues include stopping a nuclear Iran; establishing genuine Middle Eastern democracies that respect minority rights, women’s rights, and freedom of speech; and preventing massive human rights violations from continuing to occur throughout the Muslim Middle East. Solving the Israel- Palestine conflict will not address any of these issues.

An Epic Ethiopian Aliyah Story

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Asher Tagai journeyed to Israel from Ethiopia and his ordeal coming to the Holy Land is truly inspiring. Asher Tagai was born an Ethiopian Jew and has lived a hard life. In the 1980’s, the Ethiopian regime was biased against Jews and Israel and countless Ethiopian Jews were imprisoned by the government based on the fabricated charge of being a Zionist spy. Asher recounted that he was sent to jail by Ethiopian authorities on fraudulent charges, resulting in his subsequent recognition as a prisoner of Zion. In some areas of the country, Judaism was even illegal and Jews were forcefully converted to Christianity. According to Asher, “many Jews preferred to commit suicide over becoming Christian.”

Asher claims that between 1979 and 1984, many Ethiopian Jews sought to escape these conditions by making Aliyah to Israel. They left behind an ancient history and rich cultural heritage. Due to the fact that he was serving time in jail Asher was part of one of the later waves of the Ethiopian Jewish exodus to Israel. He said that he prayed to G-d a lot during this period of time to be set free, so that he would be able to come to Israel with his family. However, it was very dangerous to make Aliyah to Israel during this period of time. According to Asher, “anyone who was caught” making Aliyah to Israel “was given the death penalty.” 

Asher claims that what the Ethiopian Jewish community experienced was very similar to the exodus story in ancient times. He explained, “In one day, we packed up all of our stuff and if you couldn’t, you just left it. There was a lot of uncertainty. You could never know what happened from one day to the next.” Asher claimed that Ethiopian Jewish families were separated from each other during their voyage. He explained, “They went by non-Jewish guidance to Sudan during the night and hid during the day. There was a lot of robbery, thieves, rape, murder; every thing bad that you could imagine, along the way.”

As bad as the situation was in Ethiopia, Asher said that the situation got even worse when the Ethiopian Jews arrived in Sudan. In Sudan, members of the Ethiopian Jewish community were forced to live in horrific conditions in special camps. According to Asher, Ethiopian Jewish families with pregnant women and very small children “were sleeping in tents” in extremely hot weather. “It was like living in an oven,” he explained. Furthermore, “The food and water they got from Red Cross was in a bad condition and they got sick. Some died. At least 5 to 6 people per family died,” Asher stated, “You went to sleep and didn’t know if the person next you will get up.”

Asher was traumatized by the ordeal and still suffers from nightmares to this day. He claimed, “There were 19 bodies on the same day surrounding me and sick people had to make graves with their bare hands, even though they were sick. My sister delivered a son who died and she also got sick. She wanted to go back to Ethiopia to see her father and then died. Only her daughter survived.”

Asher finally managed to make Aliyah to Israel and upon arrival within the country, he kissed the ground. Today, he is living and working in Israel, has a family, makes sure to volunteer with the Ethiopian Jewish community and also helps other Ethiopian Jews make Aliyah to Israel so that they can be given the same opportunities that he was. When he was in prison in Ethiopia, Asher promised G-d that he would give back to the community if given the chance to make Aliyah with his family and he has kept his word regarding that. He concluded, “I suffered a lot in Ethiopia. Making Aliyah was like coming back to life. Everyday I thank God for being in Israel.”

Visit United with Israel.

Israeli Activist Promotes Women’s Rights in South Sudan

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Ophelie Namiech, South Sudan country director of the Israeli humanitarian organization IsraAID, is working in South Sudan to promote gender equality, women’s rights and helping local activists address gender-based violence.

Ophelie Namiech, a former French national, has made Aliyah to Israel and is presently serving as the South Sudan country director for IsraAID.  The humanitarian organization provides emergency relief and development assistance to different countries across the globe. In South Sudan, IsraAID is involved in development assistance for the emerging nation. 

“I made Aliyah in order to help build Israel’s future”

Namiech’s ultimate professional goal was to build a career that combined her love for the State of Israel with assisting the South Sudanese people. “I made Aliyah in order to build Israel’s future. I wanted to make a difference. I felt I needed to be part of Israel on the inside,” she stated. “It is such a pride to say that I am Israeli. It’s a reason to make Aliyah. Israel was founded based on humanitarian values.” She believes that by working to build relations between Israel and South Sudan and by accompanying the new state in in its efforts to build strong economic and social foundations, she is strengthening the role of Israel in international development and humanitarian action (Tikkun Olam). According to her, Israel has the opportunity – and the duty – to assist other friendly nations that struggled for their independence – like South Sudan – to build themselves.

Gender Issues in South Sudan

Presently, South Sudan, which gained independence in 2011, has a humanitarian crisis in the border regions of the country as well as an internal conflict. According to Namiech, “South Sudan was fifty years in war. […] Sexual violence was used as a weapon of war, like is common in East Africa. It was not only used as weapon of war but it is also traumatized the nation.” She continued, “There are not studies on this, but at least two thirds of the women have faced gender based violence, rape, sexual violence, domestic violence, etc.” Namiech claimed that the international community focused almost exclusively on helping out the border regions, and did not have the capital city Juba as a priority.

Nevertheless, “Juba faced rapid urbanization with the massive absorption of refugees, displaced people, and migrants seeking better opportunities. All of this created social and economic pressure on Juba as well as social challenges.” She continued, “You have five star hotels for internationals and then a slum area where women and children are being raped.” She personally witnessed a child getting raped by five men and claimed that such things happen on a daily basis. “No one was working in Juba, because they were focusing elsewhere,” she asserted. Yet, after IsraAID began assisting local activists in South Sudan promoting gender equality, other NGOs joined in.

Namiech Working to Make a Difference

IsraAID  seeks to train social workers, community leaders and teachers to be able to address gender-based violence on their own. Namiech claims that merely providing humanitarian assistance is not long-term thinking, since soon after, once the international activists depart, the aid also goes with them and without being given the tools to deal with the issue on their own, the South Sudanese won’t be able to effect change on their own. This is why Namiech is so motivated to provide local South Sudanese activists with the tools that they need in order to make a difference.

IsraAID has successfully developed a positive working relationship between social workers, teachers, and the police. “As a result of this, there were joint programs. They are doing joint awareness sessions in schools to raise awareness on children’s and women’s rights,” Namiech asserted. Yet in addition to assisting with collaboration between various local South Sudanese actors, Namiech has worked with IsraAID to bring the same Israelis who built the first women’s shelters in Israel to South Sudan, to train the South Sudanese how to do it. They also bring experienced Israeli therapists to train South Sudanese therapists how to treat trauma victims.

Some Rapes Should Be Considered Terrorism

Friday, June 7th, 2013

Politically-motivated rapes should be considered by Israel to be acts of terrorism en par with injuries caused by qassam rockets, rock-throwing, and suicide bombings.

As we speak, a young 19-year-old Israeli woman who was gang raped and beaten up at the tender age of 13 by four nationally-motivated Palestinians is appealing a decision made by the Israeli Defense Ministry, which claimed that her case should not be considered an act of terrorism. While everyone is speaking about the indecent remark made by the judge—who subsequently resigned from his post—Nissim Yeshaya, who had stated that “some girls enjoy getting raped,” not enough people are questioning the Israeli Defense Ministry for not classifying her case as an act of terrorism to begin with.

According to the National Insurance Institute of Israel website, a hostilities-related injury should include “an injury resulting from an act of violence whose purpose was to harm people because of their national or ethnic origin, provided that it arises from the Israeli-Arab conflict or was committed by a terrorist organization.”

According to the U.S. State Department and Title 22 of the U.S. Penal Code Section 265, terrorism is “politically motivated violence perpetrated against non-combatant targets by sub-national groups or clandestine agents.” As an Israeli woman, I find myself asking, how can one not include a group of politically-motivated Palestinian men deciding to gang-rape a Jewish child specifically because of her national origin, as an act of terrorism?

If a Palestinian rapes a Jewish woman to fulfill some animistic desire and lacks political intentions, then I could understand why it wouldn’t be classified as terrorism, although in my view it is a travesty of justice for rapists to merely serve two years in prison, as was set to happen in this case. Rape is a crime that can emotionally destroy a woman for years into the future. Many rape victims, if not given the proper therapy, and especially if they were raped at a young age, find it very difficult to function due to the trauma that they experienced. For this reason, rapists deserve much more time in prison than two years, regardless of what age they were when they committed the crime.

But when rape is politically-motivated by antisemitism, the punishment for such a crime should be en par with terrorism. In this particular instance, there was convincing evidence that these four Palestinians targeted this Jewish child specifically for her ethnicity. This young Jewish girl was literally dragged off the streets of Jerusalem at random, where she was beaten up and gang raped in such a humiliating manner that only someone motivated by racial hatred would behave in such a way. So if it is established that political motives are involved; then gang rape should be considered an injury en par with being wounded from rock-throwing, qassam rockets, or suicide bombings!

Since the 1929 Hebron Massacre, rape has been an element of Arab terrorism orchestrated against Jewish civilians as part of the Arab-Israeli conflict. More than one case of gang rape committed by Israeli Arab men has been found to be politically motivated. In the Negev and parts of Jerusalem, Arabs sexually harassing Jewish women has become a major issue. Furthermore, in Syria, Iran, and other Muslim countries, rape has been used as a political tool of terrorism in order to silence the political opposition, proving that the Arab-Israeli conflict is not the only instance where rape has been used as a tool of terrorism. There is also international legal precedent for considering rape as part of a political conflict to be a war crime. Given all of this, the Israeli authorities should treat politically-motivated rapes as terrorism, not merely as criminal acts.

The ‘Some Girls Like Being Raped’ Judge Resigns

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

Retired Tel Aviv District Court Judge Nissim Yeshaya has announced he is quitting as an appeals court judge, two days after he publicly stated in court, “There are some girls who enjoy being raped.”

He made the comment during an appeal by a 19-year-old Israeli who was raped by Arabs at the age of 13 and was appealing a Defense Ministry decision not to recognize the attack as an act of terrorism.

Justice Minister Tzipi Livni and Supreme Court President Asher Grunis spoke with Judge Yeshaya about his outburst and accepted his resignation.

“The judge announced his resignation, and this is the correct and only step in this grave incident,” Livni said.

“This is the only way to restore public trust in the judicial system,” she added. “Every judge needs to know that his being examined, correctly, under a magnifying glass and that he must conduct himself correctly as one who is guarding justice and who determines the fate of others.

“We are not speaking only about a comment but about a view that women have been struggling with for years that throws on them the guilt as victims of rape. This kind of expression from a judge is liable unintentionally to give twisted minds legitimacy to rape.

Judges also need to know that when a woman says, “No,” she means ‘No.’”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/the-some-girls-like-being-raped-judge-resigns/2013/06/05/

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