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September 3, 2014 / 8 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘art’

Artwork in German Parliament May Have Been Nazi-Looted

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

Two artworks hanging in Germany’s parliament building in Berlin may have been confiscated or acquired at artificially depressed prices by the Nazis from the original owners, German newspapers reported.

The Die Welt newspaper suggested that one of the works coincidentally stems from a gallery owned by an uncle of Hildebrand Gurlitt, the Nazi-era dealer whose huge collection was discovered in the Munich apartment of his elderly son, Cornelius Gurlitt, in 2012 and revealed to the world two months ago.

The Bundestag has responded in a statement that it is looking into the matter. Meanwhile, Die Welt said the Bundestag’s eight-member art advisory council – which includes the German president – already had determined that neither work was so-called “Raubkunst,” art plundered from occupied countries.

The two works in question reportedly are a large-format 1905 oil painting by Georg Waltenberger titled “Chancellor Bülow speaks in the Reichstag,” and a 1918 Lovis Corinth lithograph, “A street in Königsberg.” While the former is hanging in a hallway, the latter is kept out of natural light.

Die Welt reported that the lithograph was printed by the Berlin gallery of Fritz Gurlitt, an uncle of collector Hildebrand Gurlitt.

Dieter Graumann, head of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, told the Bild newspaper that the Bundestag should make its collection public and assist investigators in reconnecting possible heirs with long-lost property. Over the years, the Bundestag has returned several works to heirs.

Of the 4,000 works in the German parliament’s collection, about 700 are said to date from before the end of World War II.

Nazi-Looted Art Discovered In Munich to Go Online

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

German authorities have bowed to international pressure and are publishing a partial list of artworks found in a Munich apartment. The spectacular art find – including works by Chagall, Picasso, Matisse and Beckmann – was publicized by the Munich-based Focus magazine earlier this month.

Officials are assembling a “task force” of experts to speed up provenance research. Heading the team will be German attorney Ingeborg Berggreen-Merkel, former Assistant Secretary to the Federal Commissioner for Culture and Media.

Customs investigators last year seized the paintings, sketches and sculptures, dating from the 16th century to the modern period but stayed silent until now because they had chanced upon the art during a tax evasion probe, which compels secrecy.

The secrecy and the failure so far to publish a complete list of the works has attracted criticism from those who argue that publicizing such finds is crucial to establishing their ownership and returning them to their rightful owners.

Out of a total of more than 1,400 works, an initial list of 25 with photos went online Monday and the website was promptly overwhelmed with hits. The list may help those who are trying to reunite long-lost art with their rightful heirs.

Nazi-Looted Art to Return to Heirs of N.Y. Collector

Friday, April 5th, 2013

Two artworks sold under duress during the Nazi occupation of Germany will be returned to the heirs of New York art collector Michael Berolzheimer, who died in 1942 after escaping from Germany and settling in suburban WestchesterCounty.

Berolzheimer and his family fled from Germany in 1938 after selling his art under duress, traveling first to Switzerland before immigrating to the United States. He lived in WestchesterCounty until he died at the age of 76.

In 2011, the Holocaust Claims Processing Office of the financial services’ department opened a claim to recover works for the heirs of Berolzheimer, an attorney who pursued a lifetime interest in fine art and served on the acquisitions committees of several art museums. The HCPO earlier had recovered three other artworks for the heirs; it is working on 26 other restitution claims for the estate.

A Dutch antiquarian bookseller who owned one of the two drawings agreed to return it after learning of its origin, according to a statement from the office of Benjamin Lawsky, superintendent of financial services for the State of New York.

The 1834 pen-and-ink portrait of a geographer by Reinier Craeyvanger was bought by the Dutch bookseller at a Sotheby’s auction in 2005.

The Kunsthalle Bremen in Germany is returning a drawing attributed to the 17th century Italian artist Giacomo Cavedone. The museum acquired the drawing in 1941.

The works once belonged to an art collection of more than 800 pieces.

The Fine Art of Optimism (Podcast)

Monday, December 10th, 2012

Optimism is not just about feeling good. It is a far deeper concept that involves your entire attitude of mind. On this week’s Goldstein on Gelt show, Benjamin Zander, conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, and author of The Art of Possibility, returns to the Goldstein on Gelt show to share his observations on optimism and to explain how looking on the bright side of life is actually an art.

Artist Uses Ashes of Burnt Holocaust Victims to Paint Picture

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

An uproar over the appropriation of the burnt remains of Jewish Holocaust victims for use in an artwork has swept the Jewish world and raised questions as to how the ashes remaining at European concentration camps are treated.

Artist Carl Michael von Hausswolff used ashes he took from the crematoria of the Majdanek concentration camp in Poland in 1989 to create a painting which is now on display in the Swedish city of Lund.

According to a report in Britain’s Telegraph newspaper, an important figure in the Swedish Jewish community, Salomon Schulman, discovered the use of the ashes and wrote a letter to his local newspaper, expressing his disgust for the appropriation of Jewish remains – or anyone’s remains, for that matter – to make art.

For his part, Von Hausswolff said the ashes were deeply meaningful to him, and “contain the memories and the souls of people… tormented and murdered… in the most vicious war of the 20th Century.”

Approximately 360,000 people, over 60% of whom were Jews, died at Majdanek.

Hamshushalayim 2012 Theme: ‘Humor’

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Hamshushalayim is the central cultural festival of the winter season in Israel that attracts tens of thousands of visitors each year and offers a unique combination of hundreds of quality cultural events coupled with tourist and culinary attractions, all concentrated into four fun packed weekends during December. Thanks to a sweeping collaboration of Jerusalem’s cultural institutions, tourist centers and culinary venues, the festival-goers of Hamshushalayim are invited to spend the weekends enjoying the city till the late hours of the night.

The central theme of Hamshushalayim 2012 is ‘Humor’ – for your enjoyment in the capital, the festival will feature shows of Israeli, Jewish, Yerushalmi, bible and international humor, stand-up comedians, satire, story telling and jokesters, comedies, cabaret, humorist literature and poetry, humor in art, pantomime comics, laugh yoga, and funny theatrical tours for all the family.

Israel’s finest artist, producers and comedians will descent on Jerusalem to entertain and make you laugh: Gavri and Uri Banai on Humor in the Jerusalem theatre, Dan Almagor exploring the origins of Yerushalmi humor in a series of seminars at the YMCA. Yossi Alfy with Yerushalmi laughter stories. Caricaturist Michel Kichka in the Tower of David. A mad stand-up marathon at The Incubator Theatre. Classic comedy performances at the Khan Theatre. Movie laughter mayhem at the Cinematheque, humor in literature and poetry at Agnon House. Special shows for children at the Train Theatre, and much more.

Visit their website.

From Rockets to Roses

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Look at the amazing, amazing things created by this artist – Rockets into roses….my greatest wish is that he soon runs out of base material from which to create his amazing art and that he never be supplied with more.

Look at this website to see what beauty can be shaped when love and art is stronger than hate and destruction:  http://rocketsintoroses.com/

I hope you’ll buy something to support this – but even if you don’t – just going there to see what beauty he has created is one way to show support. I hope one day soon to buy something myself…they aren’t cheap…but God, they touch my heart.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/a-soldiers-mother/from-rockets-to-roses/2012/11/29/

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