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October 22, 2016 / 20 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Selichot’

More Sephardic Selichot

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

Sephardic Selichot this week in the Kotel tunnel.

Video of the Day

Selichot at the Kotel

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

Sephardic Jews start saying Selichot a month before Rosh Hashana.

Here is what Selichot looked like at the Kotel in 2013.

Video of the Day

Government Decides not to Abandon Gush Etzion Memorial Park

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon will not expel people deployed at the Oz VeGaon Memorial Park in Gush Etzion, contrary to fears expressed by Women in Green earlier this week.

The nationalist organization turned to Gush Etzion Regional Council leader Davidi Perl, who spoke with Ya’alon, leading to a deciding not only to keep the park intact but also to authorize it.

It was dedicated last year in memory of Eyal Yifrah, Naftali Fraenkel and Gilad Sha’ar, the three victims of Hamas kidnap-murderers from the Hebron area.

The park is located immediately east of the Gush Etzion junction and is populated by a family who protect it from Arab vandals.

There are no intentions of turning it into a full-fledged outpost, which the Defense Minister may have incorrectly assumed was the plan of nationalists. Buildings at the park are used for displays and hands-on activities for children.

“The minister of defense has once again proven that he is a friend of the settlement enterprise,” Perl said after Ya’alon’s decision.

Oz VeGaon announced on Wednesday that Selichot prayers will be held at the park Thursday at 12:30 a.m.

Sephardi Jews have been saying Selichot prayers since the first day of the Hebrew month of Elul. Ashkenazi Jews begin reciting Selichot this Saturday night. The prayers are concluded the eve of Yom Kippur.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Making a Shofar

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Rabbi Nissan of Efrat teaches how to make a shofar and blow it. In the current Hebrew month Elul, the month of Selichot (forgiveness), there is the Jewish custom of blowing the Shofar every morning.

Photo of the Day


Saturday, September 20th, 2014

Ashkenazi Jews begin saying Selichot tonight, the week of Rosh Hashana.

Selichot are forgiveness prayers that are customarily said before the Rosh Hashana holiday, until Yom Kippur. They’re typically said after midnight.

Jews of Sephardi descent say Selichot for the entire month of Elul, which is the month leading up to Rosh Hashana.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Hebron Packed with Jews On Tuesday for Tours and Prayers

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

It’s estimated that 13,000 Jews visited Ma’arat HaMachpelah (the Tomb of the Patriachs) today for tours and the evening Selichot prayers ahead of Yom Kippur.

Among those that will be at this evening’s Selichot prayers are the Chief Rabbis of Israel, city rabbis, MKs and government ministers.

There have been reports of Arabs stoning buses transporting Jews to and from Hebron.

Jewish Press News Briefs

About Selichot

Monday, September 2nd, 2013

King David was anguished when he prophetically foresaw the destruction of the Holy Temple and the cessation of the offering of the sacrifices. “How will the Jews atone for their sins?” he wondered.

G‑d replied: “When suffering will befall the Jews because of their sins, they should gather before me in complete unity. Together they shall confess their sins and recite the order of the Selichot, and I will answer their prayers.”


With the imminent approach of the new year and the Days of Awe, our preparations for the High Holidays move into highest gear. Several days before Rosh Hashanah we begin to recite the Selichot, a series of penitential prayers and liturgy.

According to Ashkenazic custom, the first Selichot are recited on Saturday night after halachic midnight,1 and a minimum of four days of Selichot must be observed. Therefore, if the first day of Rosh Hashanah falls on Thursday or Shabbat, the Selichot start on the Saturday night directly preceding the New Year. If Rosh Hashanah falls on Monday or Tuesday,2 then Selichot commence on the Saturday night approximately a week and a half before Rosh Hashanah. Following the midnight service, Selichot are recited daily (except on Shabbat) before the morning prayers, until Rosh Hashanah (aside for the Sunday morning immediately after the first Selichot, which is covered by the midnight recitation several hours earlier).

Sephardim recite Selichot throughout the entire month of Elul.

It is important to attend synagogue for Selichot, as its text contains several important passages which may be said only in the presence of a minyan (quorum of ten Jewish men).

Most Jewish communities continue reciting Selichot throughout the Ten Days of Repentance (the days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). According to Chabad custom, however, Selichot are not recited during these days (with the exception of the third of Tishrei, when Selichot are recited as part of the commemoration of the Fast of Gedaliah).3

The story is told about the fourth Chabad Rebbe, Rabbi Shmuel of Lubavitch, who once asked his illustrious father, the Tzemach Tzedek, regarding the reason for this custom. “My son,” he responded, “now is no longer the time for words. Now we must translate words into deed . . .”

Click here for the complete Selichot prayers in Hebrew.

In 2013, Selichot (according to Ashkenazic custom) will begin after midnight of Sunday morning, August 31. Contact your local Chabad-Lubavitch center for the exact time and location of local Selichot services.


1. “Halachic time” varies depending on the season, and usually doesn’t concur with our clocks. According to Jewish law, midnight is exactly halfway between sunset and sunrise. In the USA, because Rosh Hashanah is observed during Daylight Saving Time, “midnight” is often closer to 1:00 than to 12:00.

2. Due to technical calendar reasons, the first day of Rosh Hashanah cannot fall out on Sunday, Wednesday or Friday.

3. Selichot are also recited on Jewish public fast days. The fast-day Selichot are incorporated into the morning prayers.


Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/about-selichot/2013/09/02/

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