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December 8, 2016 / 8 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘survey’

Survey: A Party Led by Ya’alon, Sa’ar, Kahlon, Could Defeat Netanyahu

Friday, May 27th, 2016

An Israel Radio/Rafi Smith survey on Friday revealed that a new center-right party led by former Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon (Likud), former Education Minister Gidon Sa’ar (Likud), and still serving Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (Kulanu) would have won as many as 25 seats in the next Knesset, if the vote were conducted today.

The new, imaginary party, which for the time being is only based on the fantasies of the folks who conducted the survey and the 500 folks, Jews and Arabs, who answered, will apparently be the big winner of the next elections. Likud would be demoted to 21 seats (from 30); Lapid’s Yesh Atid’s rise would be tamed, only 2 new seats, from 11 to 13; the Zionist Camp (they really should go back to calling themselves simply Labor) would be crushed, from 24 down to 11; the Joint Arab List would retain its 13 seats; Naftali Bennett’s Habayit Hayehudi would grow from 8 to 10; Yisrael Beiteinu up from 6 to 8; United Torah Judaism up nicley from 6 to 8; Shas would remain stuck with its 6 seats; and Meretz likewise with its 5.

The question is, even considering the above fantasy scenario, whether the Ya’alon-Kahlon-Sa’ar triumvirate, assuming they would be able to overcome their egos to allow one of them to lead, would be able to form a coalition and with whom.

If they go left, they could add Lapid, Labor and Meretz for a 54-seat coalition, which could rule with the tacit, conditional support of the Arabs.

If they go right, they would have to add Netanyahu and Lapid, for a 59-seat coalition, and then, possibly, Labor, giving them a hefty, 70-seat coalition.

But should the imaginary party not be able to forge a coalition, the president would then turn to Netanyahu, yet again, who would combine Likud, Habayit Hayehudi, Yisrael Beiteinu, UTJ and Shas to get 53 seats, and then bring in an additional partner, possibly even the very triumvirate that couldn’t.

The fact is that even in their fantasy, the center parties find it difficult to make do without Bibi.

The same survey also polled the 500 likely voters as to their choice today without a dream team running: Likud goes down to 28 (from 30), making it still the unavoidable leader; Labor is cut down from 24 to 15; Yesh Atid goes up to 19; Kahlon’s Kulanu virtually disappears, down to 6; UTJ 8; Shas 7; Lieberman 8; Meretz 5, Arabs 13.

Which would mean the exact same players in Netanyahu’s current coalition could stay on, but they would have more votes to offer the slightly reduced Likud and without Kahlon. Netanyahu’s next government would then have a 61-seat majority, with Habayit Hayehudi as the second-largest partner. Kahlon could then be invited to come back, but on radically less favorable terms.

David Israel

Pew Survey: Support For Israel Eroding Among Younger Democrats

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Earlier this month, a Pew Research Center survey examining attitudes about foreign policy among the U.S. electorate found that Americans continue to strongly favor Israel (54 percent) over the Palestinians (19 percent). Yet the survey also indicated a number of trends that suggest a possible erosion of the long-held bipartisan pro-Israel consensus.

Notably, while figures show sympathy for Israel has remained relatively consistent over the past few decades, there has been a slight uptick in sympathy for the Palestinians, 14 percent to 19 percent, from July 2014 – with a substantial increase in support for the Palestinians among respondents ages 18-29, also known as millennials.

At the same time, Pew’s data confirmed a partisan divide on Israel. While support for Israel among Democratic voters has remained steady over the past few decades – 44 percent in 1978 compared to 43 percent today – there has been a sharp rise during that time in Republican sympathy for Israel, 49 percent to 75 percent, and a modest gain among independents, 45 percent to 52 percent.

Only 33 percent of Democrats who describe themselves as liberal support Israel, while 40 percent sympathize with the Palestinians.

The survey revealed a further divide within the Democratic electorate itself. Hillary Clinton supporters were more likely to sympathize with Israel than the Palestinians, 47 percent versus 27 percent, while Bernie Sanders supporters favored the Palestinians over Israel by 39 percent to 33 percent.

“Evidence has been accumulating for some time of a division among Democratic voters over Israel,” said Dr. Theodore Sasson, senior research scientist at the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies and the Steinhardt Social Research Institute at Brandeis University. “The left wing of the party is more critical of U.S. support for Israel.”

Dr. Jonathan Rynhold, director of the Argov Center for the Study of Israel and the Jewish People at Bar-Ilan University, said that generally the American public’s sympathy toward Israel has been growing since 2000.

Yet Americans have become more divided over policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and those divisions “increasingly line up with the main ideological and political divides in America,” he noted.

“Since younger Americans are more liberal, and each generation is more liberal than the previous generation, they are less sympathetic toward Israel and more inclined to believe that the U.S. should adopt an even-handed approach toward the conflict,” Rynhold told JNS. “They are also more critical of Israel’s use of military force against Hamas and Hizbullah.”

“I doubt the level of hostility [in America] will reach the levels we see in Europe,” said Brandeis’s Sasson. Rynhold echoed that sentiment, saying the gap on Israel between the American left and the European left remains wide.

“American liberals are far more sympathetic to Israel than the European left,” Rynhold said. “The gulf remains huge. The debate in the U.S. is over siding with Israel or being even-handed, and that goes for the Democrats as well. Whereas on the European left, the debate is over [being] anti-Israel or even-handed.”

Yet fears persist about the growing liberal electorate’s views on Israel, especially among younger Americans.

“Over time, as the percentage of liberals among Democrats increases, the party’s support for Israel could well become more conditional on what they perceive as Israel’s willingness to support a two-state solution and perceptions related to other liberal causes inside Israel,” Rynhold said.

(JNS)

Sean Savage

Survey: Rightwing Jews More Comfortable Speaking Out in Israel than Counterparts

Sunday, May 8th, 2016

Rightwingers are more comfortable speaking their mind in Israel, according to a survey published on Sunday by the Jewish People Policy Institute (JPPI), an Israeli non-profit, independent professional policy planning think tank. The survey was conducted as part of the Jewish pluralism in Israel Index with the support of the Davidson Foundation. According to the survey, half the people who align themselves with the left do not feel comfortable speaking out in Israel, as compared with an absolute majority of people who are aligned with the right — more than 90% — who feel “very comfortable” or “quite comfortable” expressing themselves in the Jewish State.

The survey was conducted for JPPI among 1,000 respondents, out of whom 30.4% described themselves as completely secular, 20.8% secular and a bit traditional, 22.5% traditional, 4% liberal religious, 10.3% religious, and 10.1% ultra-Orthodox.

The survey examined the image of different population groups in Israel, and their perception in relation to their contribution to the success of the state. It revealed that IDF soldiers are perceived as the most positive group, substantially ahead of any other group. At the bottom of the list are two groups which tend not to serve in the army: Muslims and Haredim. The Druze, in comparison, are very high on the sympathy ladder. Also, diaspora Jews are more popular than Israelis who chose to move abroad.

The researchers posed a string of seemingly contradictory questions: more than 60% of Israeli Jews said they favor civil marriages in Israel, but at the same time more than half objected to the possibility of “Jews marrying non-Jews.”

The majority of the Jews in Israel believe women should not be permitted to put on tefillin at the Western Wall, while 56% of Jewish respondents believe Israel must be more considerate of the views of minority groups. Nevertheless, the majority of Jews believe “secular, traditional and religious are equally good Jews.”

Interestingly and perhaps disturbingly, almost 48% believe there’s too much freedom of expression in Israel.

The term “Jewish pluralism” is defined by JPPI for the purpose of the survey as “a situation in which Jews in Israel and around the world, from different social, ideological and religious groups, regardless of their sex and ethnicity, will have an equal opportunity to express their differences in public.”

JNi.Media

Survey: 59% of Israeli Youth Are Rightwingers

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

A recent survey of the Hagal Hakhadash Institute / Israel Hayom based on interviews with Jewish high school students in the 11th and 12th grades, revealed that close to 60% of the respondents define their views as rightwing, 23% are at the center and only 13% identify with the left side of the political map in Israel.

The youths were asked questions about every facet of their lives, starting with their views on current events, general knowledge, and their leisure habits.

The survey found Israel’s youth to be very patriotic: 85% said they love their country, and 89% see their future in Israel. 88% plan to enlist in the IDF, more than half believe there is no more moral army than the IDF in the world, and 65% endorse the adage, “It’s good to die for our country,” which is attributed to Yosef Trumpeldor, a Zionist pioneer, leader and warrior who said it—or a statement in that spirit, according to several testimonies, just before dying in defense of Tel Hai in Upper Galilee, on March 1, 1920.

Israel’s youth feel that the best thing about Israel is the familial atmosphere and the people’s tendency to unite during times of trouble. The central problem is Israel’s security situation.

Israeli young people are involved in the world, have solid views, and 78% of them say they are interested in the news. Regarding the most recent security-related saga of the Hebron soldier who shot an Arab terrorist on the ground, 60% of the respondents felt he shouldn’t be court martialed, as opposed to 30% who believe he should be.

Regarding the scandalous behavior of Arab MKs who showed up to honor the families of killed terrorists with Jewish blood on their hands, close to half the Jewish youths — a whopping 48% — believe Israeli Arabs should not benefit from representation in the Knesset, and 52% still believe Israeli Arabs should have the right to vote and be elected.

As to the chance for a peaceful solution of the Israeli-Arab conflict, as many as 82% of respondents said there was no chance at all, or only a very faint chance for such a thing to happen.

The survey holds an unexpected surprise for anyone who comes in regular contact with youth anywhere in the world — 75% of respondents said they appreciate their teachers, even admire them.

David Israel

IFCJ Warns Rising Israeli Arab Angst May Become Strategic Threat

Monday, January 25th, 2016

A new poll conducted on behalf of the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews in the Israeli Arab population is raising red flags – and reinforcing recent warnings by President Reuven Rivlin about the rising popularity of Da’esh (ISIS) in that population.

Rivlin said that according to figures gleaned from “research studies, arrests, testimonies and covert analyses,” there is increasing support for Da’esh among Israeli Arabs.

The survey, conducted by the Stat-net Institute, polled a sample of 500 low-income Israeli Arabs. The findings showed that 67 percent of Israeli Arabs feel discriminated against, and 71 percent feel that low-income Israeli Jews receive more state aid than they do. Further, 54 percent of Israeli Arabs feel the government – including Israeli Arab Mks – do not care about their interests.

The poll was commissioned to measure the impact of The Fellowship’s financial support for low-income Israeli-Arab citizens, according to IFCJ founder and director Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein. Instead, it came up with clanging bells and warning signs.

“The survey shows Israel should be caring more for its Arab citizens and investing in them the same way it does with its most vulnerable Jewish citizens, not only for moral reasons but also to counter the threat of political extremism and to promote patriotism. If we don’t invest in Israel’s citizens, ISIS will,” said IFCJ founder and director, Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein.

“We found a direct correlation between Israeli Arabs’ feelings of being treated equally to Jews and their sense of belonging to society and even their willingness to serve,” added Eckstein. “If we can change the numbers, we can avoid Israeli Arabs becoming a strategic threat.”

The IFCJ has invested more than $35 million on social welfare programs for Israeli Arabs in recent years, he said. Those investments included programs to help the elderly, children, and at-risk youth, and on drug abuse prevention, emergency financial aid, job empowerment for women, and other initiatives.

The survey found that among the low-income Israeli Arabs who felt they are being treated unfairly compared to poor Israeli Jews, only 20 percent said they “feel strongly or very strongly connected to Israel.”

Only 38 percent of Israeli Arabs who feel they lack equal rights in Israel said they would perform national service.

Of those who felt they were treated equally, 58 percent of Israeli Arabs said they would perform national service.

Rivlin warned a week ago (Jan. 18) that Israeli Arab teens are growing more enamored with becoming Da’esh operatives for the ISIS terror organization.

“The Islamic State is already here – that is no longer a secret,” Rivlin told participants at the ninth annual international conference of the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS). “I am not speaking about territories bordering the State of Israel – but within Israel itself.” He, too, added that it is in the best interest of Israel to offer its Arab population a better future than the fantasies promised by terror groups such as Da’esh.

Rivlin said it is in the best interest of the state to offer Israel’s Arabs a better future than that promised by groups such as Da’esh. “If children are growing up without a dream, without hope or without aspirations, with the feeling that their blood and their lives are of a lesser value in the State of Israel, then we must think of how to offer them a dream, hope and faith,” Rivlin said.

Hana Levi Julian

Large Majority of Israelis Support More Benefits to New Immigrants

Sunday, January 24th, 2016

A vast majority of Israelis endorse the idea of offering new immigrants more economic and employment benefits — even at the expense of native Israelis.

The surprising information was revealed in a survey conducted by the Sampling, Consultation and Research Center, whose results were revealed Sunday at the weekly government cabinet meeting.

The news comes in light of an alarming wave of anti-Semitism that has struck Europe.

A whopping majority of 83 percent of Israelis in the survey expressed their belief that the State of Israel should take actions in the labor market that would grant special privileges to new immigrants.

Fifty-three percent of the survey’s respondents suggested that Israel provide financial benefits to employers who hire new immigrants.

Thirty percent recommended even requiring public agencies and large private business to set a floor benchmark of employment positions for new immigrants, even though such a policy would come at the expense of the native Israeli labor force.

Two- thirds of Israelis are concerned for the safety of Jews in the Diaspora, according to the survey.

Thirty-nine percent of Israelis believe that European Jews should escape the growing anti-Semitism in Europe by immigrating to the Jewish homeland.

Yaakov Hagoel, Deputy Chairman of the World Zionist Organization revealed the results of the survey at Sunday’s cabinet meeting.

“In light of the concern for the safety of the Jews of Europe, we have established a committee to deal with immigration barriers and we asked to check the position of the Israeli public in this regard,” Hagoel explained.

At the same time, 46 percent of Israelis recognize that many Jews in Europe continue to live there for social and economic reasons.

“The results are surprising, even to us,” commented Hagoel. “Despite the difficult economic situation in Israel, the Jews are brothers to each other in every place in the world.”

Hagoel was expected to discuss the need to reduce and remove the many barriers that new immigrants often experience in the employment sector.

Many new immigrants arrive in Israel as educated professionals with experience and potential to contribute to Israel but encounter bureaucratic hurdles. They are very often not recognized in their professional field. Professionals such as attorneys and doctors with certifications from abroad are not automatically recognized in Israel, but must instead go through a convoluted process to re-earn certification in Israel.

Hagoel was to present the establishment of a group of World Zionist Organization staff members who will work on removing the unnecessary barriers faced by new immigrants.

“There is no day more fitting than International Holocaust Memorial Day to raise this important issue to the cabinet,” Hagoel said.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Americans Split Over Palestinian Statehood, Gallup Poll Shows

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

Americans are deeply conflicted over whether the United Nations should give birth to a new Arab country in the heart of Israel’s geographic borders, and call it “Palestine.”

The Gallup polling organization surveyed the U.S. population this month to determine how America feels about this issue. Pollsters conducted telephone interviews Feb. 8-11, 2015 with a random sample of 837 adults ages 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

(The margin of sampling error was plus-minus four percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.)

The organization uncovered a conflict that splits the country almost right down the middle.

A majority of Americans still does not support the idea, however, even though they elected to vote passively: only 42 percent of those polled favored the establishment of an independent Palestinian state comprised of Judea, Samaria and Gaza, a drop from the 46 percent of one year ago, and a full 20 percent would not express an opinion at all.

Just 38 percent were opposed to the idea, however. The numbers grow higher the older the sample.

Older Americans aged 55 and up were opposed (43 percent) to the creation of an independent Palestinian state. Those younger (41 percent) were in favor – and 16 percent had no opinion.

Those with higher levels of education were more likely to favor PA statehood; however, 48 percent of Republicans opposed it, and just 33 percent of GOP members supported it. In the Democratic Party the majority supported PA statehood.

That last point in particular may have some bearing when it comes to U.S. national elections in 2016, and the run for the White House.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/americans-split-over-palestinian-statehood-gallup-poll-shows/2015/02/25/

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