web analytics
December 8, 2016 / 8 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘The Temple Institute’

Young Kohanim Reenact Shavuot Offering with Eyes on Temple Mount

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

On Monday afternoon, the new group of “Pirkhei Cohanim” (young priests) participated in the Temple Institute’s annual Shavuot reenactment at a festive event on Jerusalem’s Hass Promenade overlooking the Temple Mount. The children, dressed in specially made priestly garments, enthusiastically practiced the First Fruits ritual, which is central to the Shavuot service. Afterwards, adult Cohanim from the Temple Institute’s Nezer Hakodesh School for Kohanim, demonstrated the full Shavuot service including the First Fruits and Twin Loaves offering.

It is a positive commandment to bring an offering of the first fruits of one’s field, specifically, from the seven species of the Land of Israel, and to present them to a priest in the Holy Temple, as the Torah states: “You shall bring your first fruits to the House of the Lord your God… ” (Ex. 23:19)

Photo Credit: The Temple Institute

Photo Credit: The Temple Institute

The first fruit offerings are brought in large woven baskets and the offerings are waved before the altar, extending the basket in four directions: outwards, drawing it back towards oneself, raising it and lowering it. This is done while both the pilgrim and the Kohen (Temple priest) hold the basket.

Like all offerings made in the Holy Temple, the first fruit offering is accompanied by the blasting of silver trumpets by the Levites. The pilgrim’s declaration of gratitude to God and the presenting to God of the first fruits of their labor is naturally accompanied by festive song and dance.

In addition to the first fruit offering of the seven species, another offering was brought to the Holy Temple on Shavuot from the first of the harvest: The “twin loaves,” two loaves of wheat bread baked from newly harvested wheat. This special offering, the only leaven ever brought to the Temple, was also “waved” before the presence of God and thus elevated… and these breads represented the blessing of God’s influence and blessing on man’s earthly, physical needs throughout the year. These two breads were waved on the eastern side of the altar by a Cohen, together with an offering of two sheep for the festival.

Intensive research and experimentation into the proper preparation of the twin loaves culminated in the baking of the twin loaves used for the day’s reenactment.

The event was part of the Temple Institute’s ongoing efforts to prepare for the Third Holy Temple. Having already researched all relevant halakhic information and recreated more than 60 sacred vessels for use in the Temple, the Institute is now focusing on training kohanim in rituals that have not be practiced for over 2,000 years.

Rabbi Chaim Richman, International Director of the Temple Institute commented: “The world has never been so ready for the rebuilding of the Third Holy Temple in Jerusalem. Today’s event was yet another sign of the spiritual awakening that is growing stronger every day in the Land of Israel and around the world, as more and more people, young and old, are joining the effort to rekindle the flame of the Holy Temple and make concrete steps toward the rebuilding of the Holy Temple in our day. Having recreated over 60 sacred vessels and published dozens of books on the topic, the Temple Institute is now proud to be training a new generation of kohanim in the ways of their ancestors.”

David Israel

History-Making Wedding Secretly Performed on the Temple Mount

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

The Temple Institute initiated an actual wedding ceremony on the Temple Mount, only the second time this has been performed in some 2000 years. The following is a press release we just received, describing the clandestine simcha.

An engaged couple recently approached Rabbi Chaim Richman, the International Director of the Temple Institute, and asked him if he would supervise their marriage on the Temple Mount. After scrupulously examining the detailed halachot (Jewish law) concerning the marriage ceremony, and consulting with other rabbinical authorities, Rabbi Richman happily accepted the task upon himself.

The couple met with Rabbi Richman early one recent morning in the Old City of Jerusalem, at the headquarters of the Temple Institute, where the blessing over wine was made, a prerequisite to the marriage ceremony. Two appointed witnesses then met the couple at the entrance to the Temple Mount. The witnesses were obligated to both hear the declaration of marriage from the lips of the groom and see him place the gold wedding band on the bride’s finger. All members of the party were instructed by Rabbi Richman that this had to be done without drawing the attention of the Israel police or the Muslim Waqf guards who would be accompanying the group of Jewish worshipers on the Temple Mount. Were they to notice they would certainly arrest all the parties involved and remove them immediately from the compound.

Courtesy

Courtesy

The plan went like clockwork, and while walking along the eastern perimeter of the Temple Mount, Rabbi Richman gave a tacit signal. The two witnesses drew close to the groom, who, ring in hand, said quietly to the bride, “Behold, you are sanctified to me with this ring, in accordance with the law of Moshe and Israel,” and quickly slipped the ring on the bride’s finger. This act, known as kiddushin (sanctification) is the binding act of marriage in any Jewish wedding ceremony. The couple was now married. They later stood beneath the chuppah (marriage canopy) at a different location and heard the reading of the ketubah (marriage contract).

The Temple Institute was able to capture the entire Temple Mount wedding on video, but in accordance with the wishes of the couple, are only publicly sharing two still shots, one of the groom placing the ring on the bride’s finger, and one of the bride holding up her hand, showing the ring to the camera.

The ancient custom of brides and grooms visiting the Temple Mount (separately) on the day of their wedding has been revived in recent years, but the actual performance of the wedding ceremony on the Temple Mount is a unique act in history following the destruction of the Holy Temple 2000 years ago.

Mazal Tov to the couple and a huge Yishar Koach to Rabbi Richman and the Temple Institute.

David Israel

The Third Temple – A 3D Walk-Through

Sunday, July 26th, 2015

This is a walk-through the main sanctuary of the Holy Temple, showcasing decades of research and tens of innovative Halachic solutions to various perplexing issues that were resolved to create fully functional, ready-to-use plans. As the visual tour sweeps through the sanctuary, one can see the menorah, incense altar and showbread table, all of which have already been prepared by the Institute, among 70 other sacred vessels. The presentation was specially released to coincide with the Ninth of Av, the Jewish national day of mourning which commemorates the destruction of the First and Second Temples.

This is not a ‘virtual’ representation, but a portion of a complete and highly detailed architectural plan which has been prepared for the immediate construction of the Holy Temple. The plan includes all of components that will be used in building: marble, stone, concrete, wood, flooring materials, overlay of gold, etc.

The external view presents the openings, windows, chambers, the outer hall, the Sanctuary and the Holy of Holies.

In the first stage we are moving through the hall’s entrance. As we continue we arrive at the golden chains described in Tractate Middot, which the young priests-in-training would climb in order to view the decorative crowns that were placed in unique windows above the entrance to the Sanctuary. The visit continues on to the 38 chambers that surrounded the Sanctuary. The door opens and we find ourselves within the first chamber. We turn left and enter into the Sanctuary. From the right we see the three major vessels of the Sanctuary: The golden altar, the table of the showbread, and the menorah. We also see the curtain with its depiction of the two cherubim.

This curtain is actually a double curtain, that separates between the Holy area (the Sanctuary), and the Holy of Holies. We look up to the ceiling of the Sanctuary, which reaches a height of 40 amot. Near the ceiling are the ‘narrowing windows’ (Kings I 6:4) which direct from the Temple outwards.

Turning behind us, we see the doors of the Sanctuary towards the east, as they are opened each morning by the priests, revealing the blue skies of Jerusalem at sunrise.

From the Sanctuary, we turn back to the chambers and go out to the long passageway known as the ‘mesiba.’ We ascend stairs that lead to the roof of the chambers. We continue moving, encircling the Temple from the north and west, afterwards turning east.

At the end of the passageway stands a special ladder that is used to ascend to the upper level. This level has a very high level of sanctity. One opinion maintains that it is only entered once in seventy years (for maintenance purposes).

In summary, this is a highly-detailed building plan which includes room for further innovation by professionals and craftsmen, including decoration, heating and electric etc. According to the decisions of the steering committee that will be established to oversee the construction of the Third Holy Temple, which can be begun immediately.

The video comes one year after the Temple Institute appealed to its supporters to take part in an Indiegogo crowd funding campaign that raised over $100,000 for the architectural plans. The video was first released to supporters of a current campaign to raise the first kosher Red Heifer in Israel in over 2,000 years. Over the past five years, the organization has released its most ambitious campaigns and poignant videos to reframe the mourning period into one of active preparation for the Third Holy Temple.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/raise-a-red-heifer-in-israel/story

Rabbi Chaim Richman, International Director of The Temple Institute noted: “One third of all Torah commandments pertain to the building of and service in the Holy Temple. Today, we not only mourn the destruction of the two Holy Temples, but also our inability to fulfill one third of the Torah. Over the last three decades, the Temple Institute has done everything in our power to research and prepare for the Third Temple. As world Jewry sits on the ground mourning the first two Temples, we have taken a huge leap towards the rebuilding, by releasing a 3D architectural rendition of the Third Temple”

Video of the Day

Cattleman Raising Historic Herd of Red Heifers in Israel

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

JERUSALEM – The Temple Institute is working together with an Israeli cattleman to raise a red heifer in Israel, in strict accordance with the Biblical commandment. The project is the culmination of years of research at the Temple Institute that fuses ancient religious texts and modern science.

“We’ve been working on this for decades. The red heifer has to be supervised and cared for in a special way since its birth. And it’s very complex,” Rabbi Chaim Richman, the International Director of the Temple Institute told Tazpit News Agency.

Over two thousand years ago, during the near millennium that the two Temples stood in Jerusalem on the Temple Mount, the ashes of the red heifer were used by the priests for purification purposes.

In order to carry out this project, the Temple Institute has joined forces with an experienced Israeli cattle rancher who is an expert in the science of animal husbandry, under the halachic supervision and guidance of the rabbis of the Temple Institute. The cattle rancher is utilizing the technique of implanting the frozen embryos of the Red Angus cattle, which originally come from North America in Israeli domestic cattle.

“We can select proper candidates from those calves that are born. They will be cared for under specific instructions,” explained Rabbi Richman to Tazpit.

The end result of this program will be the introduction of the Red Angus breed into Israel said Rabbi Richman, who also added that it would improve the quality of cattle in Israel. This method, authorized and approved by Israel’s Ministry of Agriculture, has already proven successful with the birth of a number of male Red Angus.

Raising a perfect red heifer in accordance with the Biblical commandment requires advance planning, preparation and constant supervision according to Rabbi Richman. In order for a red heifer to be considered kosher for Biblical use, it must literally be raised from birth under specific conditions and in a controlled environment, which has never been attempted in Israel during modern times.

“Three decades of research and preparation have led us to this special day. During this period known as the ‘Three Weeks,’ as world Jewry mourns the destruction of the Second Holy Temple, the Temple Institute has taken a bold move towards the third. Having already prepared over 70 sacred vessels including the golden menorah and High Priest’s gemstone-encrusted breastplate, now is the time to fulfill the commandment of the Red Heifer,” said Rabbi Richman.

In order to raise funds and awareness, the Temple Institute has launched a crowd funding campaign called “Raise a Red Heifer in Israel” on Indiegogo, following the success of the organization’s campaign last year that raised over $100,000 towards the architectural plans of the Third Temple. Within a day of the initial launch for the red heifer campaign, nearly $11,000 has been raised so far.

The Temple Institute aims to raise $125,000 for the red heifer project and according to the fundraising page on Indiegogo, contributions will go towards embryo implantation, veterinary care and feed, identification and separate care of candidates for the perfect red heifer, as well as publication of halachic research and findings. The successful introduction of suitable red heifers to Israel is the first project of a multi-level program that will span a number of years.

According to Jewish tradition, a red heifer is a female cow that is three years of age with a particular reddish hue and cannot have even two hairs of any other color. It cannot be used for any type of labor and must be blemish free. The biblical commandment regarding the red heifer can be found in the Book of Numbers and is considered as the only antidote to the state of impurity brought on by death.

“The emergence of the red heifer is not some mystical miracle,” elucidated Rabbi Richman. “It is a practical development alongside Torah knowledge and science.”

The Temple Institute is a research and education center founded in 1987 by Rabbi Yisrael Ariel, who served in the paratrooper brigade that liberated the Temple Mount during the Six Day War in 1967. In addition to educational activity, the institute has also recreated over 60 sacred vessels for use in the third Temple, which can be seen at the Temple Institute’s Visitors Center in the Old City of Jerusalem.

Anav Silverman, Tazpit News Agency

Master Craftsman Chaim Odem – Designer and Creator of the the Golden Menorah:

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Video of the Day

Yehudah Glick Reviews the Temple

Thursday, October 30th, 2014

Temple Activist Yehudah Glick at Machon Hamikdash, The Temple Institute, in the Old City of Jerusalem.

In the above photo, Yehudah Glick is examining a model of the Temple.

If you haven’t visited the new Temple Institute Museum, you should, it’s highly recommended.

Photo of the Day

MK Feiglin to Address Visitors to Temple Mount from which He is Barred

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

The Temple Institute, together with MK Moshe Feiglin’s Manhigut Yehudit (Jewish Leadership) are inviting Succot tourists from around the world to join them on a “Temple Experience” reminiscent of the ancient Aliyah L’Regel (pilgrimage).

The half-day program will begin with a Halachically permissible tour of the Temple Mount, followed by a tour of the brand new Temple Institute Visitors Center which is home to some of the 60 sacred vessels that the Temple Institute has recreated for use in the Third Temple.

The tours will be led by Rabbi Chaim Richman, International Director of the Temple Institute and the foremost English-speaking authority on the Holy Temple.

Following the tour, Knesset Deputy Speaker Moshe Feiglin—who is himself barred from going near the Temple Mount by a decree of his own government and party leader—will address the group on the importance of Jewish sovereignty and prayer on the Temple Mount. Which he himself is not permitted to do, even though, as an MK, he can walk freely into, say, the super secret nuclear plant in Dimona.

“We invite all those that have come to spend Succot in Jerusalem to join us on a unique Temple Experience,” said Rabbi Richman, adding: “The Temple Institute has worked tirelessly for almost three decades to prepare for the Third Temple and we have accomplished a great deal in moving closer to the rebuilding of the Third Temple.”

Richman added: “The Temple Mount is the holiest site on earth and Jews are commanded to be seen there, three times a year, on Succot, Pessach and Shavuot. By visiting the Temple Mount in accordance with Halacha, we show Hashem that we are serious in our longing for the Beit Hamikdash.”

Unless the prime minister of Israel, based on a directive from the Jordanian Waqf caretaker agency, which is the de facto owner of the Temple Mount these days, dictates that some of us—such as MK Moshe Feiglin, a member of the PM’s Knesset coalition—may not go up there.

Deputy Speaker of the Knesset Moshe Feiglin has blessed the initiative saying:

“It is my great honor to team with The Temple Institute for this Succot experience. I look forward to personally greeting all the participants and sharing the joyous holiday in the way the Torah commands.”

But he would not defy the prime minister and walk onto the actual Temple Mount, because prime ministers must be obeyed. And there you have it, on this fine day of Tishrei, 5774, in the Jewish State where religious Jews are kept by secular politicians on the command of Arab executives from setting foot on the holiest place on Earth. Good luck to all of us and a fine new year.

 To register for the Succot tour click here.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/mk-feiglin-to-address-visitors-to-temple-mount-from-which-he-is-barred/2013/09/10/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: