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Posts Tagged ‘Ben Gurion University’

Israelis Invent Revolutionary Alternative Fuel

Sunday, November 17th, 2013

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have invented a process to make a green feed alternative for crude oil out of two of the most common substances on Earth – water and carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas detrimental to the environment.

Profs. Moti Herskowitz and Miron Landau, along with Dr. Roxana Vidruk and the team at BGU’s Blechner Center of Industrial Catalysis and Process Development have developed a green feed that can be converted using well-established technologies into liquid fuel and delivered using existing infrastructure to gas stations. As opposed to other alternative fuel sources, such as electric cars, which require additional infrastructure, this green feed would merely replace oil as the input for refineries.

The project is partially supported by I-SAEF (Israel Strategic Alternative Energy Foundation).

Herskowitz unveiled the revolutionary breakthrough at the Bloomberg Fuel Choices Summit in Tel Aviv last week.

“It is an extraordinary challenge to convert carbon dioxide and hydrogen to green feed,” says Herskowitz. “The technology is based on novel specially tailored catalysts and catalytic processes. Well-established, commercially available technology can be directly applied to the process developed at BGU. It is envisaged that the short-term implementation of the process will combine synthetic gas produced from various renewable and alternative sources with carbon dioxide and hydrogen.”

Prof. Herskowitz, who is the Israel Cohen Chair in Chemical Engineering and the VP & Dean at BGU, indicated that the new process should become a reality in the near future. “Since there are no foreseen technological barriers, the new process should become a reality within five to ten years,” he says.

Regarding other alternative fuels, Herskowitz maintains that his invention represents a game-changer.

“The liquids that have been used over the past decade are ethanol (alcohol), biodiesel and/or blends of these fuels with conventional fuels, as will continue to be done in the foreseeable future. These alternatives are, however, far from ideal, and there is a pressing need for a game-changing approach to produce alternative drop-in liquid transportation fuels by sustainable, technologically viable and environmentally acceptable processes from abundant, low-cost, renewable materials.”

Researchers at the Blechner Center have also developed a novel process for converting vegetable and algae oils to advanced green diesel and jet fuels.

U of Chicago Teams up with Ben Gurion for Clean Water

Monday, June 24th, 2013

The University of Chicago and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev will begin funding research collaborations that apply the latest discoveries in nano-technology to create new materials and processes for making clean, fresh drinking water more plentiful and less expensive by 2020.

The joint projects will explore innovative solutions at the water-energy nexus, developing more efficient ways of using water to produce energy and using energy to treat and deliver clean water.

“We feel it is critical to bring outstanding scientists together to address water resource challenges that are being felt around the world, and will only become more acute over time,” said University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer.

Why I Made Aliyah to Southern Israel

Thursday, June 20th, 2013
Rachel Avraham on BGU campus

UWI Staff writer Rachel Avraham blogs from her own experience about why English-speaking Jews are returning from exile to make Aliyah to Southern Israel.

An increasing number of Jewish immigrants from English speaking countries are deciding to make their homes in Southern Israel, a peripheral region of the country, rather than in the Anglo enclaves in the greater Jerusalem and Tel Aviv areas. While there have always been more adventuresome Anglo Jewish immigrants who have made Aliyah to Southern Israel, this phenomenon is speeding up following a decision by Nefesh B’Nefesh, an organization that assists North American Jewish immigrants, to launch a Go South Program to encourage Anglos to move to Southern Israel. Since the introduction of this program, the number of Anglos moving to Southern Israel has tripled.

I recently made Aliyah too, and I decided to move to Be’ersheva because I wanted to pursue a masters’ degree in Middle Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University. I felt that I could improve my Hebrew language skills significantly and learn more about the Middle East region by not living in an Anglo enclave. The gimel and dalet neighborhoods that surround Ben-Gurion University, where I live, have many Mizrahi Jewish inhabitants who immigrated to Israel from Arab states. Speaking daily to people whose ancestors hailed from Arab countries offered me an in depth understanding of Israeli politics, Middle Eastern and Jewish Diaspora history, the Israeli-Arab conflict, and Mizrahi culture, which one merely would not get by living in an Anglo bubble. Residing in Be’ersheva also sped up my immersion into Israeli society in a way that one would not get in places like Tel Aviv or Jerusalem. I also had other Zionist reasons for wanting to move to Israel, which included a desire to find a Jewish spouse, to live in the midst of rich historical sites, and to provide a better Jewish education for my future children.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO LIVE IN THE SOUTH

Ein Geddi

It is critically important for Israel that Jewish immigrants settle in all parts of the country and not just the greater Jerusalem and Tel Aviv areas. Israel’s first Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion, believed that the future of Israel lies in the Negev, since it consists of 66 percent of the land within the State of Israel and offers much open space for Jewish communities to be established. The Negev is an integral part of Israel’s past, present, and future, hosting flourishing Jewish historical sites dating back to antiquity. The fortress at Masada was the last Jewish zealot stronghold against the Roman forces, while Ein Gedi boasted a Jewish community dating back to biblical times and Be’ersheva, as the home of the Jewish patriarch Avraham, is the cradle of Jewish monotheism. The Negev is rich in Jewish history and Jewish immigrants from English speaking countries like myself really want to live surrounded by this majestic historical heritage.

BGU campus

Also a strong Jewish population in the Negev counters the Palestinian Authority claim that the Negev is a settlement as some Israeli Bedouin have protested that the Negev should belong to them, not the Jewish people.

Visit United with Israel.

Israel Railroad Evacuating Students

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Throngs of Israeli student pack the Be’er Sheva train station, due to the closing of Ben Gurion University. To accommodate the masses of students, Israel Rail Road is sending extra long trains to evacuate the students looking to escape northward.

Israeli Innovation Could Make Water Drinkable in Africa

Monday, August 13th, 2012

In a world where freshwater resources are becoming increasingly scarce, Israel–a country that is two-thirds arid–has become a leader in developing the necessary technology for making salt water potable.

The Israeli desalination company, IDE Technologies, which has been in operation for more than 40 years, has made many advances in desalination technology, installing over 400 desalination plants in 40 countries including the Caribbean Islands and United States. IDE Technologies has also won major contracts with Cyprus, India and Australia, and last year with China.

Since 2011, the Israeli-built desalination plant in Tianjin is China’s largest and most environmentally friendly desalination plant to date, running on some of the waste heat produced by a nearby power plant, producing fresh water and salt.

However, desalination plants for the most part are extremely costly for less-developed nations, as they use enormous amounts of electricity and are location-sensitive. But thanks to a recent Israeli discovery, the desalination system may become much more affordable in areas like Africa and the Middle East.

Researchers from the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research at Ben Gurion University of the Negev and central Arava R&D, have found a way to utilize solar energy at a fraction of the cost which can be custom-engineered for the desalination process, according to the Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA).

The new innovation uses solar energy panels to power the pumps of a desalination unit that generates clean water for crops. More importantly, the technology utilizes unique nanofiltration membranes that enable farmers to decide which minerals should be retained from the water to feed various types of crops, a method which requires much less energy. The new system is currently being tested in the Arava Valley of Israel, south of the Dead Sea, where the basin is very dry. The results thus far show that farmers can use up to 25 percent less water and fertilizer than what has usually been needed in that area.

According to Andrea Ghermandi of the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research at Ben-Gurion University and one of the system’s creators, the current environment is forcing agricultural systems to become more economical. Ghermandi told the MFA that “the growing global demand for food and competition for resources among economic sectors compel future agricultural systems to be more efficient in the use of natural resources such as land and water.”

Another important researcher in the discovery, Ben Gurion University’s Rami Messalem explained that the” breakthrough here was to make the system more economical and we’ve done this using nanofiltration cleverly. Our system is compatible with electricity but is based on the premise that it can be used in poor countries, in places where you don’t have an electricity source—as a standalone system.”

The MFA website indicated that the new desalination system was made possible thanks to funding from Swiss philanthropist Samuel Josefowitz.

Israeli Innovation: Blood Test to Detect Multiple Cancer Types

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Researchers at Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University in Be’er Sheva are saying they’re past the preliminary stage of developing a unique method that may provide early detection of many types of cancer, using a simple blood test. Clinical tests which were performed recently yielded detection in close to 90 percent of patients.

“The research is still using small-scale clinical tests,” said Prof. Joseph Kapelushnik, head of the center’s children’s meta oncology department. “But our aim is to develop an efficient, cheap and simple method to detect as many types of cancer as possible.”

Early detection, coupled with a rapid assessment and a quick and effective response is viewed as the best and most cost-efficient ways of dealing with cancer. But the process of detection can be cumbersome and costly, and each procedure reveals only a limited number of cancer types.

Prof. Kapelushnik’s team developed a unique method which makes it possible to detect cancer cells through a blood test, using infrared light. A sample of only one cubic centimeter (less than a teaspoon) is placed in an instrument which examines the spectrum and yields results which point out the presence of cancer in the patient’s body.

“We’ve managed to distinguish between different types at a rate of around 90 percent sensitivity,” said Prof. Kapelushnik. “The data is limited for now, and we’ll have to test thousands of patients to determine that the method works, but at the moment we are pleased with the results.”

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Johnson & Johnson, to name just one team, are among groups of scientists who are in the process of seeking a simple blood test that may be able to identify cancer cells in the blood stream. But Prof. Kapelushnik thinks his research is at a more advanced stage than competing, similar efforts.

“We should be able to detect the cancer before it had a chance to metastasize,” he says. “And this can mean fewer treatments, less suffering and many more lives saved.”

The Soroka University Medical Center is the largest medical center in southern Israel, and the second largest in the country.

Israeli Scientists Grow Sperm Cells in Lab

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

A new technique developed by Ben- Gurion University researchers has resulted in the laboratory creation of mouse sperm cells from testicular germ cells.  Profesosr Mahmoud Huleihel says he hopes the scientific breakthrough will be a major stride in male fertility.

The study was performed in cooperation with Prof. Eitan Lunenfeld at Soroka University Medical Center and Prof. Stefan Schlatt of the University of Münster in Germany.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israeli-scientists-create-sperm-cells-in-lab/2011/11/17/

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