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April 24, 2014 / 24 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Coca Cola’

Can of Coke Costs Up to Six Times more in Israel than in US

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Next time you drink a can of Coca Cola in Israel at a kiosk or tourist spot, take into consideration you are swallowing six times more money than you would if you had bought it at an American outlet, such as Walmart, according to a survey conducted by the Globes newspaper.

Americans pay on average 4.5-5.5 shekels for a 1.5 bottle of the carbonated stuff, which works out to about 1.28-$1.56 in the United States. Israelis pay about 40 percent more on average, forking out 6.3-5.4 shekels for the same amount.

The difference in prices for Diet Coke is even higher.

According to Globes, a six-pack of Coca-Cola costs one-third more in Israel than in the United States, and c can costs on average 230% more.

Private sources have reported that the Israeli franchise of Coca-Cola has a profit margin of approximately 70 percent.

Hello, SodaStream.

Scarlett Johansson Is SodaStream Super Bowl Star (Video)

Monday, January 13th, 2014

The Israel-based SodaStream is returning to the Super Bowl this with a sure-fire successful commercial starring Scarlett Johansson, billed as the world’s sexiest woman.

SodaStream won more publicity that it figured at last year’s Super Bowl when CBS rejected its scheduled commercial because it showed the environmental advantages of its product for making soda at home while crossing CBS’ red line by making fun of market monsters Coca Cola and Pepsi Cola.

A tamer commercial was broadcast during the Super Bowl, but SodaStream gained no less publicity from CBS’ surrender to the beverage giants.

The commercial and publicity helped out SodaStream all over the map, but this year’s plan is a blockbuster.

Johansson will show off herself and SodaStream in the fourth quarter of the Feb. 2 Super Bowl on Fox TV. Instead of putting down Coca Cola and Pepsi Cola, this year’s commercial is supposed  “to demonstrate how easy it is, how sexy it is, to make your own soda,” Daniel Birnbaum, chief executive at SodaStream International, told The New York Times.

“It’s more of a love story between a brand with a purpose and a passionate user,” he said, explaining that Johansson has been using SodaStream at home for several years.

SodaStream also is known for something else besides its product – it operates a manufacturing plant near Maaleh Adumim, which the Boycott Israel movement considers the dreaded Occupied West Bank.

It has placed SodaStream on its black list, for whatever that is worth. And now that Johansson, who by the way is Jewish even if from a “Multi-cultural family” that celebrated Christmas and Hanukkah, is sipping SodaStream in front of millions of people, let’s see if the boycotters will be intellectually honest.

Will they demand that people not see Johansson’s “Her” movie? Will the ASA folks stop going to see her movies?

Sexiest woman alive or not, Johansson now is SodaStream’s first-ever ambassador, having signed a contract covering several years.

Unknowingly, she might be one of Israel’s best ambassadors for a Jewish presence in Judea, where SodaStream employees both Palestinian Authority and Israel workers with equal rights and conditions.

Maybe Johansson will even visit Israel and the Judean Desert factory one day.

That would really be sexy.

Report: PepsiCo Offered $2B for ‘Settlements’ Labeled SodaStream

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

With SodaStream, we could have saved 500 million bottles on Game Day alone. If you love the bubbles set them free.”

PepsiCo is negotiating with Israeli-based SodaStream to buy out the firm for $2 billion, according to the Israeli Calcalist business newspaper. SodaStream’s shares in Germany shot up nearly 20 percent after the report.

SodaStream, listed on NASDAQ, manufactures machines that make carbonated drinks from tap water and also produces flavors, carbon dioxide refills and re-usable bottles.

Officials at the two companies refused to comment on the report or were not available.

SodaStream has become a big hit in the United States, where the company “stole the show” with its commercials during the Super Bowl this year, drawing bitter complaints from carbonated beverage companies, which applied pressure to CBS for SodaStream to tone down its message  that buying carbonated beverages in plastic bottles is bad for the environment. Pepsi and Coke also did not like the idea of SodaStream making fun of their companies, and the original version of the commercial was canned but can be seen below

A buyout by PepsiCo, or possibly by Coca Cola if SodaStream wants to try for a larger purchase, could place the company’s facility in Maaleh Adumim, east of Jerusalem, in jeopardy.

Soda Stream is a favorite target of the Boycott Israel movement because of the plant’s location beyond the old borders of Israel. The rub, as Lori Lowenthal Marcus explained in an article Tuesday night, is that SodaStream’s American-born CEO Daniel Birnbaum promotes hiring and treating Palestinian Authority Arabs just like Jews.

Both Arab and Jews share the company dining hall in Maaleh Adumim, and there are facilities for both Muslim ands Jews to pray.

The Maaleh Adumim factory employs approximately 900 Arabs from Judea and Samaria. “Everyone works together – Palestinians, Russians, Jews,” a Palestinian employee named Rasim at the Maaleh Adumim site previously has been quoted as saying. “Everything is OK. I always work with Jews. Everyone works together, so of course we’re friends.”

The report of a possible buyout sent the shekel-dollar rate down approximately half a percentage point, to below 3.65 shekels to the dollar, because of the possible injection of $2 billion worth of shekels.


Jewish-Egyptian Businessman Suing Coca-Cola for Using his Family’s Confiscated Property

Friday, May 4th, 2012

Jewish Canadian-Egyptian businessman Raphael Bigio is seeking a full U.S. appeals court to rehear his lawsuit against Coca-Cola for using his family’s property in Egypt.

Bigio and his family filed the brief Wednesday in the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York. He is suing the Coca-Cola Company headquartered in the United States for its use of family property in the Cairo suburbs that was confiscated by President Gamal Abdel Nasser in 1965.

Bigio is hoping to settle with the beverage giant for compensation for what he alleges is substantial profit. Coca-Cola Egypt had leased the property from the family following Nasser’s purge.

A three-judge panel of the New York-based appeals court dismissed the case in March on the grounds that the complaint did not contain sufficient evidence that Coca-Cola caused or directed Coca-Cola Egypt to build additional buildings on the property.

In a news statement distributed by his attorney, the Washington firm of Lewin & Lewin, Bigio said his family’s story is “one of flagrant abuse, first by an anti-Jewish government, then by a greedy corporate Goliath.”

Coca-Cola has said that an Egyptian state-owned company, not Coca-Cola, owns the property; that it is a minority stakeholder in the company that leases the land; and that the land was purchased lawfully from the Egyptian government.

A Kosher Cowboy In Montana

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2007

         There’s a popular saying that wherever there’s Coca-Cola, there’s Chabad.

 

         That’s true even in Marlboro Country – Bozeman, Montana, where Rabbi Chaim Bruk, 25, and his wife, Chavi, 22, have brought the light of Torah.

 

         THE JEWISH PRESS: How many Jewish families are there in Montana?

 

         Rabbi Bruk: About 500 families – roughly 1,200 Jews. That’s a very small population. We’ll be involved primarily in adult education, with classes in Judaism, its customs and culture. I live in Bozeman, but from time to time I’ll give Torah lessons in neighboring towns like Billings and Helena.

 

         What made you come to Bozeman, of all places?

 

         I was here three times in the past during the summers, when I was part of the Lubavitch corps that visit remote states to bring them Yiddishkeit. I saw a growing Jewish community thirsting for a connection to Judaism.

 

         What do you do about kosher food or a minyan?

 

         Kosher food doesn’t exist in Montana. Meat is shipped in from Rubashkin’s in Iowa, and dairy products I bring back with me whenever I visit New York. The closest mikvah is in Salt Lake City, a 7-hour drive from here.

 

         We have no minyan here either. This Shavuos will be the first time I will have a minyan in my house for the reading of the Torah. We were given a Torah by a couple in Helena, Montana, who had an old one they brought with them from their shul in Chicago after it closed down. They never used it and so they gave it to us.

 

         A couple weeks back, two Chabad emissaries were chosen to join President Bush in Washington for the National Day of Prayer – and you were one of those two. How did that come about?

 

         Well, I received a phone call from Rabbi Levi Shemtov in Washington telling me it would be a good opportunity for a young shaliach like myself to attend this event, where I’d be able to meet my senators and congressmen and other influential people who could help me later on in my mission in Montana.

 

         I’d already promised some people that I’d attend an Israeli fair that day, so I was faced with a hard choice: either take advantage of an opportunity to get to know other Jews in Montana – and, after all, that’s what I’m here for – or go to Washington. In the end I decided I would have an opportunity to meet these local Jews later, while the opportunity in Washington was a once-in-a-lifetime thing.

 

         Did you meet with the president?

 

        Unfortunately no, because he was very busy and left the room before anybody had the chance to speak with him on a personal basis. But I met with my senators and with Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman – who was very surprised that Chabad is in Montana.

 

         I met with Montana’s congressional delegation, talking to each representative about Jewish and Israeli issues. I made some good connections with my senators, Max Baucus and Jon Tester. I already got a call from Baucus’s office informing me that he wants to participate in a Jewish community function here.

 

         It’s important that our elected officials understand that even in Montana, Judaism is alive and well and thriving.

 



Rabbi Bruk (r) visiting with Senator Lieberman in Washington.


 

 

         You were quoted as saying that there are many “closet Jews” in Montana who are ashamed of their Jewishness and that you hope your visibility will bring some of them out into the open. Has that happened yet?

 

         Yes, we always invite people over for Shabbos meals and I hear things like, “You know, rabbi, it’s been 30 years since we experienced a real Shabbos dinner.” An older woman said that when she first saw me, I reminded her of her grandfather. Once, when I stopped at a red light in town, a guy pulled up aside of me and rolled down his window and said “Hey are you the new rabbi in town?” I said I was. He said “Well, I’m Jewish.” So I invited him for Shabbos.

 

         Every Shabbos we have a class of between 7 and 12 people who come to learn the Torah portion of the week. The same people keep coming back, so that’s a good sign.

 

         The word is definitely out. It’s not going to happen overnight. People who moved to Montana were not too connected to Yiddishkeit in the first place, but slowly there will be a change. We’re also working with students on the campus of Montana State University. I’m getting phone calls and e-mails from people who’ve seen our website. It’s been phenomenal in terms of public relations. One of the TV stations recently interviewed me and during the report on the evening news, they mentioned that anyone wanting more information should check out www.Jewishmontana.com. We received a lot of hits as a result.


 

         Why do Jews choose to move to Montana, and where do they usually come from?

         Mostly from the West Coast. I don’t know why they’re moving, but the word is out that Bozeman is a gorgeous place to live, that there’s a lot of recreation here – skiing in the winter, hiking in the summer, a national park, fly fishing.

 

         The more Jews who come, the better. As a shaliach, it’s wonderful to see a Jewish community grow.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/a-kosher-cowboy-in-montana/2007/05/22/

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