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October 25, 2014 / 1 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Tel Hashomer’

Would Hawking Meet Paraplegic Arab Saved by Israel?

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Columnist David Suissa, the founder of OLAM magazine, has challenged theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking to visit a three-year old Gaza paraplegic who is being cared for by Israel.

Hawking shocked the entire Israel political spectrum, from left to right, by his boycotting President Shimon Peres annual “Presidential Conference’ because of the “occupation.”

Hawking who is severely handicapped by a deteriorating disease and is confined to a wheelchair, is able to communicate through a device that is run by a computer chip designed and developed in Israel.

“Instead of getting upset at Hawking, I would rather we invite him to visit the Edmond and Lily Safra Children’s Hospital, part of the Tel HaShomer complex in the Israeli city of Ramat Gan, Suissa wrote in the Los Angeles Jewish Journal.

There, he would meet a three-year-old Arab toddler with no arms and no legs, named Mohammed al-Farra.

“Mohammed was born in Gaza with a rare genetic disease. His parents abandoned him, and the Palestinian government refused to pay for his care.

“As soon as he was born, he was rushed to Israel for emergency treatment. As reported in Huffpost, his genetic disorder left him with a weakened immune system and crippled his bowels, and an infection destroyed his hands and feet, requiring them to be amputated.

“Since then, he has spent his days and nights in an Israeli hospital undergoing treatment and learning how to use prosthetic limbs. His grandfather lives with him. Mohammed has been warmly embraced and cared for by his Israeli doctors, who have arranged for him and his grandfather to live in the sunny pediatric ward.”

Suissa asked, “I wonder what kind of boycott Hawking would have in mind after meeting little Mohammed, and after learning about the thousands of other Arab children from the West Bank and Gaza who are routinely cared for in Israeli hospitals?

“Well, I can think of at least one: It would be a boycott of every country in the world that neglects to care for disabled children like Steven Hawking and Mohammed al-Farra.”

Wife of ‘Businessmen’s Rabbi’ Attempted Suicide following Bribery Charges

Sunday, October 14th, 2012

Deborah Pinto, wife of Rabbi Yoshiyahu Pinto, who is suspected, along with her husband, of trying to bribe a senior police officer, attempted suicide on Sunday by taking pills. Mrs. Pinto, who was picked up for questioning last Thursday, together with her husband, and was released with him under restrictive conditions, is in satisfactory condition at the Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer, Walla reported.

Rabbi Pinto released a statement saying: “We pray for the well being of the Rebbetzin along with thousands of followers. Our attorneys warned the authorities about her condition. Unfortunately, they did not show here the required sensitivity. We are certain that she will recover soon and say what she has to say to the investigators, until all of them understand that there was nothing wrong with her behavior and that a great injustice has been done.”

At the end of his interrogation today, Rabbi Pinto was taken to the hospital, where he is staying by his wife’s bed. He received a special suspension of his house arrest so he can be with his wife. Many associates and family members have arrived at the hospital.

The investigation against Rabbi Pinto and his wife began a few weeks ago, after Pinto allegedly offered the chief of the police investigations division chief, Brigadier General Bracha, hundreds of thousands of shekels in return for details of an ongoing police investigation. The officer reported the offer to the head of the Investigations Department, General Yoav Segalovitch, who sent Bracha back to gather evidence against the rabbi. When he became convinced an investigation was called for, Segalovitch appointed a special investigation team to handle the sensitive case.

Rabbi Pinto and his wife returned last Thursday from the U.S. and the moment they landed were taken for questioning in the city of Ramla, where investigators told them of the bribe allegations against them. In addition, police are considering charges of money laundering against the rabbi and his wife. They couple have both denied the allegations.

At the end of the investigation, they were taken to a hearing before a judge, where police asked that they be released under restrictive conditions—house arrest—as well as post bail of 1 million shekel each and be forbidden to leave the country for six months.

Rabbi Josiah Pinto is considered the spiritual leader of prominent Jewish businessmen in Israel and around the world. In recent years, many business leaders have been making pilgrimages to Rabbi Pinto’s house, and accompany him on his annual journey to the grave of Rabbi Eliezer Papo (1785–1828, author of Pele Yoetz, a manuscript on ethical behavior) in Bulgaria.

Among those tied to the rabbi, are Shari Arison, Nochi Dankner, Jacky Ben-Zaken and Ilan Ben Dov.

Rabbi Pinto, who began his career in Ashdod, now divides his time between Israel and Manhattan, where he mentors a large community of Jewish businessmen. He counsels businessmen before they make major transactions, and in many cases serves as an arbitrator in financial disputes. Last June, Israel Forbes magazine estimated Rabbi Pinto’s fortune at $75 million.

Peres’ Hernia Surgery Successful

Saturday, May 12th, 2012

Israeli President Shimon Peres successfully underwent surgery to treat a hernia.

Peres underwent the surgery on Friday at the Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer. Doctors say that the surgery was successful and that Peres is feeling well.

The hernia was discovered in Peres’ abdomen during his recent state visit to Canada.

Cyber Attacks UPDATE: Anti-Israel Hackers Strike Israeli Hospitals’ Websites

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Anti-Israel hackers infiltrated the websites of two Israeli hospitals on Wednesday, paralyzing them for hours in the latest strike in the ongoing Arab-Israeli cyber war.

The websites of Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer and Assouta Medical Center in Tel Aviv were both taken offline in a manner similar to previous cyber attacks on Israeli websites, according to security sources. The websites have since been restored.

 

 

An Unforgettable Rosh Hashanah

Saturday, November 12th, 2011

Last Rosh Hashanah 5771, I walked with a heavy heart to the small synagogue in the hospital at Tel Hashomer. Two and a half months had passed since my son David’s terrible accident, and he was still unconscious. The doctors remained split. Some tried to explain that this type of injury did not leave room for optimism. The days, weeks and months that passed seemed to wither our hope.

The first day of prayers passed unremarkably. I arrived at the hospital synagogue early, chose an inconspicuous place in the back row, hid myself in my prayer shawl and attempted to concentrate on the words in the small prayer book. From the anonymity of the crowd and my general distress, I was able to feel alone with my Maker and to verbalize my supplications. Nobody paid any attention to me. That, at least, is what I wanted to think.

On the second day of Rosh Hashanah, I once again set out for the synagogue at the same time and with the same heavy heart. Once again I took my place at the back of the small synagogue. But as the time for the blowing of the shofar approached, a murmur wafted through the congregation. Everyone turned around, calling my attention to the large wheelchair that was cumbersomely making its way to the front of the synagogue.

I did not understand immediately why everybody was looking at me until I realized that it was David laying/sitting in the chair, and that the person pushing him was my wife Tzippy, who had decided to set out on the difficult trek with the unwieldy chair from one end of the hospital to the other – so that David would hear the sound of the shofar on Rosh Hashanah. I quickly approached them. Suddenly, I realized that I had not been alone in my prayers. Everybody in the synagogue was praying with me. I found myself standing with David at the front of the room, and when the time came to read the Torah, I was called up to make the blessings.

To me it was an obvious act of God as the portion of the Torah to which I was called up was the story of the akeidat Yitzchak (the binding of Isaac), read on the second day of Rosh Hashanah. I recited the blessing of the Torah and read along in a whisper straight from the Torah with the congregation’s Torah reader.

“Take your son, your only one, whom you love,” the holy letters crashed into my being straight from the parchment, as my whole body began to tingle. “…And the two of them walked together.”

At that moment I felt that the letters were talking about the father and son standing right there. My son, at my side, and I were now being brought to the akeidah. Tears that I had repressed deep inside me since the accident welled up and out of my eyes, straight onto the holy Torah scroll.

At the end of the prayers, I walked lightly to the rehab ward. My heart was no longer heavy. I felt that with this prayer session I had accepted God’s judgment that leaves no room for fear. Perhaps this is also how Abraham and Isaac felt during those fateful moments. All the prayers, blessings and acts of kindness by members of the nation of Israel – big and small, more observant and less observant – that had flooded us since the accident enveloped me. I felt that everybody had prayed for David and that I had prayed as hard as I could, and now it was in God’s hands. Whatever He decided, I would accept. That was a huge relief.

Rosh Hashanah 5771 ended. The Ten Days of Repentance flew by quickly. Three months had already passed since the accident and David was still unconscious. I decided to spend Yom Kippur at home with our other children. Just moments before the sun set on Yom Kippur eve, Tzippy called from the hospital. “David is talking!” she shouted almost hysterically. “Talk to him and hear for yourself!”

“Shalom,” I heard the familiar voice of my son, weak but clear.

At the end of the conversation I wrapped myself in my prayer shawl and turned toward the synagogue for the Kol Nidre prayers.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/moshe-feiglin/an-unforgettable-rosh-hashanah/2011/11/12/

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