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August 24, 2016 / 20 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Jerusalem’

10 PA Police Vehicles Storm into Eastern Jerusalem in Pursuit of Suspects

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Early on Monday morning this week, a convoy of eight PA military vehicles and two vehicles with Israeli plates traveled into eastern Jerusalem, which is under Israeli sovereignty, Israel’s Channel 2 News reported Tuesday night. The convoy included about 50 uniformed PA security personnel, members of Unit 101–the shock troop founded by the late Chairman Yasser Arafat, and the PA Preventive Security.

The convoy’s mission was to detain four PA Arabs suspected of murdering two PA policemen a week ago in the Shechem area. The four suspects were able to evade the local security forces and find shelter in heavily Arab eastern Jerusalem. The PA security force pursued them, weapons drawn, inside Israeli territory.

PA forces entered the Jerusalem municipality’s Arab neighborhoods of Ras Shehadeh, Ras Hamis, and the Shuafat refugee camp. The forces received no approval for their actions, nor did they alert Israeli authorities, or attempt to coordinate the chase.

This highly irregular even took place against the background of the sizzling violence in the PA city of Shechem, where confrontations between an estimated 100 gang members and police have resulted in two policemen shot dead, two wanted men beaten to death by police, and a senior militia leader gone rogue being lynched by police in his jail cell.

According to Arab media reports, many of the militias that sprang into existence during the 2000 second Intifada have become criminal gangs and have been fighting PA police over turf in several cities.

JNi.Media

Outreach Pioneer And Longtime Jewish Press Columnist Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis Passes Away

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

For the statement by the Rebbetzin’s family, please click here.

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis, pioneer in Jewish outreach, founder of the international Hineni organization, and Jewish Press columnist for more than fifty years, passed away Tuesday at the age of 80.

Rebbetzin Jungreis was born in Szeged, Hungary, in 1936, where her father, HaRav Avraham HaLevi Jungreis, was chief rabbi.

In 1947, after going through the horrors of the concentration camps and the Holocaust, the Jungreis family arrived in Brooklyn, where the Rebbetzin married a distant cousin, HaRav Meshulem HaLevi Jungreis. The couple settled in North Woodmere, New York, where Rabbi Jungreis was the spiritual leader of Ohr HaTorah.

The Rebbetzin and her husband embarked on a lifelong mission devoted to combating the ravages of secularization and assimilation in the United States.

It was in the early 1960s that Jewish Press publisher Rabbi Sholom Klass and his wife, Irene, met the Jungreises at the old Pioneer Country Club in upstate New York. Impressed by the Rebbetzin’s dynamic style and passion for helping others, the Klasses suggested she write a weekly column for the paper.

The column, Rebbetzin’s Viewpoint, soon debuted and became the longest running column in the history of The Jewish Press. Letters come to the Rebbetzin from readers all over the world who hoped to see their questions answered in the paper.

“I wanted the word ‘rebbetzin’ to be part of the column’s title,” Rebbetzin Jungreis said, “because I wanted young women to realize what a noble position it is to be a rabbi’s wife.”

In an interview last year with Naomi Klass Mauer, Rabbi Klass’s daughter and the current publisher of The Jewish Press, the Rebbetzin described her connection to the paper as a deeply personal one:

“Despite many offers from other periodicals,” she said, ‘I have only to picture your holy father and your very special mother, whom I loved, to know why I continue to write for The Jewish Press.”

Rebbetzin Jungreis’s interest in outreach – kiruv – went back to her girlhood years.

“The idea of bringing people back to Yiddishkeit was inside me from my childhood,” she told Mrs. Mauer. “It really started back when my father would encourage me to bring in the neighborhood children. But the older I got the more I realized how great the mission really was. I was asked to speak at a Young Israel collegiate convention. I looked out at the audience and told myself, ‘If I were to have an organization, I would speak to reach people, to wake people up. I would even speak in Madison Square Garden to students and young people. I would call it Rock and Soul, to wake up their souls.’

“From there the idea grew. My father was always encouraging me to reach out and before I officially started Hineni I asked him to take me to all the rabbanim for a berachah. He took me to chassidic rebbes and yeshivish rabbis, to Rav Moshe Feinstein and Rav Yosef Soloveitchik, among others, and all gave me their blessings.”

Shortly after Hineni was launched in 1973, the Rebbetzin’s vision of speaking at Madison Square Garden became a reality, and Hineni became a worldwide movement, leading an uncountable number of Jews to Jewish observance.

Traveling the world to spread the message of Torah, the Rebbetzin somehow found the time to author several best-selling books including The Jewish Soul on Fire, The Committed Life, The Committed Marriage and Life Is a Test.

She was recognized by numerous world leaders for her work. She shared a mutual admiration with President George W. Bush – not only was she asked to deliver a benediction at the 2004 Republican National convention, President Bush also appointed her to serve on the honorary delegation that accompanied him to Jerusalem for the celebration of the 60th anniversary of the state of Israel in May 2008.

The Rebbetzin was not one to let advancing age prevent her from pursuing her outreach work, even a broken hip and a torn meniscus. Through her later years she lived life at a pace that would have exhausted someone half her age.

Asked about her vitality, she credited – what else? – Jewish Scripture.

“I take my inspiration from Tehillim,” she told Naomi Klass Mauer. “The psalm for the Sabbath day – Psalm 92, verses15-16: ‘They are vibrant and fresh even in ripe old age and proclaim how our Lord is right, His word inerrant.’ ”

 

Rebbetzin Jungreis is survived by her children Chaya Sora Gertzulin, Rabbi Yisroel Jungreis, Slovi Wolff, and Rabbi Osher Jungreis, and by many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. (The Rebbetzin’s husband passed away in 1996.)

The levayah took place Wednesday morning at the Agudath Israel of Long Island in Far Rockaway.

Jason Maoz

Israeli-Arab Charged with Sending Money to Families of Hamas Terrorists

Sunday, August 21st, 2016

By Michael Bachner/TPS

Jerusalem (TPS) – An Israeli-Arab resident of Jerusalem has been arrested and indicted in court for receiving tens of thousands of US dollars from a Hamas operative in Turkey. He allegedly intended to send the money to families of Hamas terrorists, with the intention of encouraging terror attacks against Israelis.

Israel has frequently accused the Palestinian Authority leadership of paying stipends to the families of perpetrators of terror attacks against Israelis, as a way of encouraging such attacks.

The indictment was filed on Friday at the Jerusalem District Court against 39-year-old Seif Al-Din Abdel-Nabi on charges of contacting a foreign agent and illegal funding of terrorism.

According to the indictment, Abdel-Nabi had known Hamas operative Zakariah Najib for years before giving Najib the money. Najib has served time in Israeli prison for involvement in the abduction and murder of IDF soldier Nachshon Wachsman in 1994. He was released in a prisoner swap in 2011 when abducted Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit was released in exchange for over 1,000 terrorists.

Abdel-Nabi met Najib in Turkey during a business trip to a clothing shop he owns in Istanbul, the indictment elaborated. Najib knew that the defendant lived in Jerusalem and asked him to send the money to Israel, where he would be ordered to transfer the funds to families of terrorists who were either killed or serving time in prison. The money transfer was meant to be a remuneration by Hamas for the terror attacks.

During several trips to Turkey, the defendant allegedly received a total of USD 25,000 from Najib. He used various techniques to hide the money when traveling to Israel, such as having attempted to disguise the money transfers by using different mobile phones and coordinating them in public places.

“By committing the above actions, the defendant knowingly maintained contact with a foreign agent without sufficient explanation in order to promote or fund acts of terrorism or to provide a reward for terror attacks,” read a statement by the Jerusalem District Attorney’s Office, which has requested that Abdel-Nabi remain in custody until the end of court proceedings against him.

The Jerusalem Police on Sunday morning also arrested six residents of the Arab neighborhood of Jabel Mukaber who are suspected of joining and supporting a terror organization.

The evidence was obtained through the interrogation of Soufian Abdou, who was arrested on Friday for supporting a terror group just several days after completing a 14-year prison term for attempting to poison Israelis at a coffee shop in Jerusalem. Abdou’s remand has been extended until Monday.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Turkish Parliament Passes Israeli Compensation Bill

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

The Turkish parliament on Friday night approved a deal for Israel to pay $20 million to the families of Turkish participants who were killed in the 2010 Gaza flotilla flagship Mavi Marmara incident, Anadolu reported. The deal ushers in the normalization of diplomatic relations between the two countries after a six-year break.

The money will be transferred in a lump sum deposit to a bank account opened by Turkey and shared through diplomatic channels, and the transaction will be completed within 25 business days of the bilateral agreement taking effect.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said earlier this month that Jerusalem had met all of Ankara’s preconditions for normalizing ties, which were degraded in 2010 after Israeli commandos were attacked on the high seas when they were trying to take over control of the Gaza-bound Turkish ship in international waters. Nine Turkish activists who attacked the Israeli soldiers were killed and 30 injured, one of whom later died of his injuries.

Turkey demanded an official apology from Israel, compensation for the families of the dead activists and the lifting of Israel’s Gaza blockade. But Ankara settled for two out of three: in 2013 Prime Minister Netanyahu expressed regret over the incident to Turkey’s then-prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

The approval of the deal had been delayed on account of the failed coup in Turkey. The deal was actually signed a month and a half ago in Jerusalem by Israel’s Foreign Ministry Director Dore Gold and in Ankara by Turkish outgoing Deputy Foreign Minister Feridun Sinirlolo. The Netanyahu security cabinet approved the deal by a vote of six to three, with Ministers Liberman, Bennett and Shaked voting against.

JNi.Media

Tu b’Av Love and the Power of “Shema”

Friday, August 19th, 2016

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Shema Yisrael! The phrase that one hears when the Torah comes out of the Ark, when a child is named, every day morning and night, and even when, God forbid, the sword is at your throat. Rabbi Mike Feuer joins Rabbi Yishai for Spiritual Cafe to discuss the epic Torah portion of Ve’etchanan, the Ten Commandments, the Shema, and the fact that there is no other but Him! Don’t miss the stories, the laughs, and your emails on this week’s Yishai Fleisher Show.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Moshe Herman

Jerusalem Spreads Slowly To The East

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Fresh off three weeks of mourning over that which is still missing in “rebuilt Jerusalem,” let us now take an optimistic look at the ongoing expansion of the Holy City. We would like specifically to look toward the sun: the east of eastern Jerusalem.

Jerusalem has traditionally expanded toward the west. This is true not only of the modern era but even during the times of King Hezekiah of Judea nearly 3,000 years ago. Visitors to the Old City are likely familiar with the “Broad Wall,” much of which (over 200 feet) is preserved “as was” amid today’s modern Jewish homes.

King Hezekiah built it to the west of what was then Jerusalem, for the purpose of protecting the most recent olim chadashim (new immigrants) to the city – refugees from the exiled Ten Tribes who made their way to the Holy City. Upon their arrival, the king expanded the small city to the west – marking the direction for generations to come.

We have seen the westward expansion in recent decades and centuries most clearly. Ever since the city was walled in the early 16th century by the Turkish Sultan Suleiman, the Jews and other residents basically clung to the safety of the enclosure and did not move outside the walls. Even when leaving the city for business, they would return at night, locking the gates behind them.

Only in the 19th century did several brave Jewish pioneers seek to “break out” – to the west. In 1860, the first residential neighborhood outside the Old City was dedicated: Mishkenot Shaananim, just west of Mt. Zion. The site had been purchased by Sir Moses Montefiore from funds left for him in Judah Touro’s estate. The original plan was for 20 new apartments, with an accompanying modern bathhouse and a mikveh, to be used by families of the kollelim of the Old City for three years at a time. The objective was to enable as many families as possible to enjoy the modern homes and non-crowded living conditions.

It turned out, however, that the demand did not quite meet the supply, because the residents were afraid to leave the safety of the walls. In the end, families had to be offered not only permanent residence there but also a monthly stipend in order to move in.

Despite its rocky start, it led to the founding of other new neighborhoods outside the walls, including the Russian Compound to the north of Mishkenot Shaananim, Meah She’arim still further north, and many others.

In 1967, when the Old City and environs were liberated, the same trend continued: new neighborhoods to the west, north, and south. What of the east? All the growth, expansion, and dynamism passed it by, and it was left to the foreigners, most of whose ancestors had arrived only in recent decades from Syria, North Africa, and other Muslim areas.

Rabbi Yisrael Rosenne, author of a column in one of Israel’s longest-running weekly synagogue Torah sheets, Shabbat B’Shabbato, dedicated his thoughts last week to the “rays of light” coming from the east. He noted the small but blossoming sites of new Jewish settlement in what is truly, and not merely in political jargon, eastern Jerusalem. They deserve to be mentioned here as well: Beit Orot, Beit HaShiv’ah, Maaleh HaZeitim, Nof Tzion, the City of David, Kidmat Tzion, and others.

One new Jewish site in eastern Jerusalem is Beit HaHoshen, two adjacent buildings atop the Mt. of Olives purchased by a Jewish group in April 2006. A giant Israeli flag unfurled above it can be seen from any high point in Jerusalem – a symbol of the Jews’ return to their homeland after nearly 2,000 years of wandering.

The Yemenite Village in eastern Jerusalem is another site that deserves our attention. Founded in 1885 by Yisrael Dov Frumkin, he built a synagogue there and paved the way for some 65 Yemenite Jewish families to live on the slopes of the Mt. of Olives. The settlement thrived, but the Arab riots that engulfed the Land of Israel in the 1930s defeated it. The British rulers told the Jews they couldn’t protect them and that they must leave, but promised they could return. Little did anyone realize the promise would be fulfilled not by the British, but by the state of Israel, and only many decades later. Over the years, many Jewish families have returned to the various “new” homes in the area: Beit Yehonatan, Beit HaDvash, Beit Ovadiah, Beit Frumkin, and more.

E-1: #1 in the East

Yet the largest of all projects east of Jerusalem is essentially frozen without even having gotten off the ground. Two decades ago the government of Israel decided on a large-scale housing project east of the capital. It was called E1 – E stands for “east” – and was planned to be built on a large tract of land to create a contiguity of Jewish presence toward Maaleh Adumim.

The E-1 site covers an area of largely uninhabited, state-owned land, and is of critical importance. Without control of the E-1 area, wrote the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs back in 2009, Israel must worry “about a Palestinian belt of construction that will threaten Jerusalem from the east, block the city’s development eastward, and undermine Israel’s control of the Jerusalem-Jericho road. This major artery is of paramount strategic importance for Israel in order to transport troops and equipment eastward and northward via the Jordan Rift Valley in time of war.”

Despite this, alas, E-1 remains a reality only on paper, due to international fears fueled by Arab pressures. The claim that a Jewish E-1 would cut in half the PA-controlled areas of northern Judea and undermine PA contiguity is false. Israel has actually planned a new highway, with no security roadblocks, that would allow northbound Arab traffic to pass east of Maaleh Adumim.

Most unfortunately, the frozen E-1 program is barely even mentioned these days in public discourse. The only encouraging news on E-1 in recent months has been the confiscation or destruction by the IDF Civil Administration of EU-funded structures for Arabs, in various stages of construction.

KeepJerusalem has long emphasized the importance of more and more construction in all parts of Jerusalem, as well as the need to stand up for Israeli interests even in the face of strong Arab and international pressure. Construction and increased housing will solve many of Jerusalem’s long and short-term problematic issues, and must become a top priority of the city and national government. For more information, to help out, and/or to participate in bus tours of news-making areas in Jerusalem, contact tours@keepjerusalem.org.

Hillel Fendel and Chaim Silberstein / KeepJerusalem.org

Israeli Ministry of Tourism Launches Competition in Developing Tourism Applications

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

By Ilana Messika/TPS

Jerusalem (TPS) – The Israeli Ministry of Tourism launched its second Hackathon on Monday, a competition spearheaded by the ministry’s Information Systems, Digital and New Media Division designed to develop tourism applications for mobile devices.

“We expect the hackathon to motivate startups to develop significant and innovative applications for tourists,” Tourism Ministry spokeswomen Anat Shihor-Aronson and Michal Gerstler told Tazpit Press Service (TPS). “Those applications are part of Israel’s digital identity and make up the infrastructure that supports tourists when they plan out how to tour Israel.”

“The project is part of the ministry’s efforts to promote innovation and to diversify and improve the tourist experience in Israel,” they explained.

The ministry set up a tourism information database on its website to help with the development of the applications. The database allows any business to be included in accordance with certain criteria and lists hotels, bed and breakfasts, trails, tour guides, and the like. The index was launched in Hebrew and in English, but will be translated into other languages later in the future.

A total of ten Hackathon participants will be selected by November, 2016 to take part in the upcoming 23rd Innovation Conference at the International Mediterranean Tourism Market, (IMTM) which will be held on February 7-8, 2017 at the Tel Aviv Fairgrounds.

The IMTM is a professional trade exhibition of the Israeli tourism market. According to the IMTM website, the conference “features exhibitors representing just about every aspect of Israel’s tourism market, alongside a significant number of exhibitors from overseas. The fair is highlighted by professional workshops, seminars, and press conferences”.

Israeli and global tourism industry leaders will serve as judges in the competition, alongside Tourism Ministry Director-General Amir Halevi. Tourism Minister Yariv Levin will present the prize to the winning team.

Shihor-Aronson and Gerstler informed TPS that “while the development of the application has obvious advantages in that it can serve a larger target audience, it is also important in that it can serve the Israeli consumer and has the ability to rekindle a love for Israel among Israeli youth in general and among computer programmers in particular.”

The top three finalists will receive cash prizes of NIS 10,000, NIS 5,000, and NIS 2,500, respectively.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israeli-ministry-of-tourism-launches-competition-in-developing-tourism-applications/2016/08/18/

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