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September 22, 2014 / 27 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘member’

Black Eyed Pea at the Wailing Wall

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Allan Pineda Lindo, Jr., better known as apl.de.ap (pronounced “Apple D Ap”), is a Filipino-American rapper, record producer, and drummer, best known as member of the Grammy Award-winning group The Black Eyed Peas.

Apl.de.ap is a frequent visitor to the Holy Land. Here he is at the Wall yesterday, Monday August 13, 2012.

Note the kabalistic red string on his wrist and the security man behind him.

No such thing as too much protection.

We’re told he asked to visit the Temple Mount as well, but police feared that his rapping might be misconstrued as a form of non-Muslim prayer by the true owners and operators of the place, the Waqf, and it would start a major riot.

According to David Brinn of the Jpost, the Black Eyed Peas are steeped in Jewish culture. They shout “Mazal tov” in their hit “I Gotta Feeling,” and they performed “Hava Nagila” in concert, making them a favorite with Israeli audiences.

Can’t have too much Jewish scholarship.

Profitable Ticket

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Excitement was in the air as the 12th Siyum HaShas of the Daf Yomi cycle approached. Mendy, who had joined the Daf seven and-a-half years earlier, eagerly anticipated taking part in this major event at MetLife Stadium along with 93,000 other participants.

Mendy’s wife was due the following week, but he didn’t expect this would affect the Siyum. That morning, however, as Mendy got ready to go to shul, his wife said: “Things have been happeningI’ve been having a lot of contractions throughout during the night. I know you hoped to be at the Siyum this evening, but plan to go to the hospital laterI’d like you to be available today.”

In shul, at the Daf group, Mendy told his neighbor, Ezra: “I bought a yellow $180 ticket to the Siyum tonight, but will not be able to make it. Do you know of anyone who is still looking for a ticket?”

“I have a business associate who is looking for an extra ticket,” said Ezra. “He might be happy to buy it from you.”

“If you can sell it for me, I would very much appreciate it,” said Mendy, “It cost $180, but I’ll sell it for $150, or even $120.”

Ezra called his associate, Mr. Kurz. “Someone in our Daf group has a $180 ticket available ticket,” he said. “Are you interested?”

“Absolutley!” exclaimed Mr. Kurz. “Bring the ticket to the office and I’ll give you the $180.” Ezra decided not to mention that Mendy had only asked for $150.

Ezra took the ticket to work and received the $180. He put aside $150 for Mendy and kept $30 for himself.

“All’s well that ends well,” thought Ezra with satisfaction. “Mr. Kurz got his ticket to the Siyum; Mendy recouped the $150 he wanted; and I earned $30 in the process!”

While driving to the Siyum, Ezra told his chavrusah, who learned regularly in a Business Halacha shiur, what happened with the ticket. “I’m not sure that what you did was right,” said his chavrusah. “Mendy told you to sell the ticket for $150. You had no right to charge Mr. Kurz the extra $30 and should return it to him!”

A lively discussion erupted in the car. Another person said: “Since you sold the ticket for Mendy, whatever you got for it is his! You have to give him the full $180.”

A third passenger said: “I don’t see any problem in what you did. Mendy got his price, and the rest was given to you. You earned it!”

A fourth person suggested: “You and Mendy should split the $30, since you both had a share in it.”

For twenty minutes, they debated the issue back and forth. Finally, Ezra said: “Why don’t we ask Rabbi Dayan at tomorrow’s Daf?”

The following morning, the Daf group assembled, with strengthened numbers, to begin learning Maseches Berachos. Everyone was red-eyed from the previous night’s Siyum but exhilarated from the experience.

When the shiur finished, Ezra said: “A fascinating monetary case came up yesterday, which we debated in the car on the way to the Siyum.” He related the story to Rabbi Dayan.

“What happens with the extra $30?” Ezra asked.

“This question was posed to the Rosh 700 years ago,” Rabbi Dayan replied. “The Rosh [Responsa 105:1], cited by the Tur and Shulchan Aruch [C.M. 185:1], ruled that if the seller stated a certain price and the agent sold for more, the additional money belongs to the seller. Thus, you should give the remaining $30 to Mendy.”

“But why?” asked Ezra. “How is this different from any other business, where the middleman buys and sells for a profit?”

“The reason is because Mendy never sold you the ticket,” explained Rabbi Dayan. “You were simply his agent, or representative to sell. When Mr. Kurz gave you the $180 for the ticket, it was on behalf of Mendy.”

“And why not give the $30 back to Mr. Kurz?” asked Ezra.

“There was no mistake on his part,” said Rabbi Dayan. “He was aware of the item he was buying and of the price he was paying. You were a diligent agent in getting the full price for the seller.”

“But why shouldn’t I be entitled to the $30 difference as a brokerage fee?” asked Ezra.

Entrepreneur David Schottenstein, Jewish Courage in Business and Israel

Monday, July 30th, 2012

David Schottenstein is a member of the famous Ohio Schottenstein Talmud family but he has earned his own fame as a brilliant dynamic businessman who for three years running was one of “America’s Coolest Young Entrepreneurs” on the 30 Under 30 list of Inc. Magazine.  During his current visit to Israel he sat down with Yishai to discuss how he built Astor and Black and to explore his outlook on being connected to Israel and his changing perspective as he experiences life in Judea, Samaria, and the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem.

Incorrect And Ill-Advised Assumptions: A Response To Critics Of The Levy Report

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Mr. Peter. A. Joseph, Chairman, Israel Policy Forum Mr. David A. Halperin, Executive Director, Israel Policy Forum Dear Mr. Joseph and Mr. Halperin,

Permit me to introduce myself. I am Ambassador Alan Baker, a member of the Edmond Levy Commission established to examine the status of building in Judea and Samaria and to make recommendations to the government on this and related issues.

As you may know, I am the former ambassador of Israel to Canada and former legal adviser to Israel’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In the latter capacity, since the early ‘90s I have served as a member in the Israeli delegations to the peace process negotiations with Israel’s neighbors, including the negotiation and drafting of the various agreements between Israel and the PLO.

I read with considerable dismay the letter to Prime Minister Netanyahu, dated July 13, 2012, sponsored by IPF and signed by 41 prominent personalities in the U.S. Jewish community, urging him to reject the Levy Commission’s findings and recommendations.

Rather than responding to each individual signatory directly, I am forwarding this response to you both, as chairman and executive director respectively of IPF, in the hope you will ensure that it is circulated among all the other signatories to the letter.

From the content and tenor of the letter, I suspect the signatories are basing themselves on selective media reports and other sources that in fact bear no relation whatsoever to the actual content of the Levy Commission report itself. This is perhaps understandable because, to the best of my knowledge, no English language version of the report exists (apart from a translation by me of the brief summary of the basic conclusion and recommendations).

Accordingly one may presume that none of the signatories have actually read the content of the report. In this context, one may wonder on what basis 41 prominent, important and responsible leaders of the U.S. Jewish community could seriously proffer criticism of a report that they have not read and presume to advise the prime minister of Israel to reject it.

Permit me, with respect, to presume that had the signatories read the report, they would not find any reason to claim, as stated in the letter, that the report “will place the two-state solution, and the prestige of Israel as a democratic member of the international community, in peril.”

Similarly, the description of the report as “legal maneuverings” and as something that will “add fuel to those who seek to delegitimize Israel’s right to exist,” other than insulting to myself and the other members of the commission in light of our respective contributions to the welfare and prestige of Israel, is totally devoid of any basis.

The central and reasoned conclusion of the report, reaffirming the legal and historic rights and claims of Israel with regard to the area and the nature of Israel’s presence therein, is no different from Israel’s policy statements over the years, including speeches by all of Israel’s leaders and ambassadors in the United Nations, as well as in official policy documents issued over the years by Israel’s Foreign Ministry.

There is nothing in the report that could in any way be interpreted as placing the “two-state solution” in peril. The opposite is in fact the case. The report reiterates, in paragraph 9, that despite Israel’s well-based and solid legal and historical claims to sovereignty over the area and the right of Israelis to settle therein in accordance with the requisite legal norms and requirements, as set out in the body of the report, consecutive Israeli governments have chosen to opt and continue to opt in favor of conducting bone fide and pragmatic negotiations with the representatives of the Palestinian people and the Arab states, with a view to determine the fate of the area.

This is completely compatible with the address by Prime Minister Netanyahu to the U.S. Congress last May, quoted in your letter.

The main body of the Levy Report deals with practical ways of resolving the outstanding issues concerning planning, zoning and building in the area, in light of the confusing situation in this field that has developed over the last few years. The report proffers recommendations for adjudicating land-ownership disputes between Palestinian and Israeli claimants – all with a view to ensuring just, proper and fair administration.

The ‘Fleas’ Are Hopping off Kadima’s Carcass in Search of Better Fur

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

Ben Kaspit, NRG’s political analyst (used to be Maariv’s political analyst, but Maariv is no more, much like Kadima), today compared a political party to an ox that pulls the ideological plow in an attempt to leave his imprint on the field. In the ox’s hair there are often fleas which take a ride on the ox but, from their point of view, they, too, are doing the plowing.

As soon as the ox decides it’s time to retire, or when retirement is forced on him by the natural elements, the fleas start searching for a new fur to jump to.

Kadima’s ox, according to Kaspit, the mythical Ariel Sharon, was forced to retire so long ago (he suffered a stroke and lapsed into a comma on January 4, 2006), that by now Kadima is made up of mostly fleas.

In quick succession, Sharon’s first replacement, Ehud Olmert, got into criminal trouble and resigned in disgrace; his second replacement, Tzipi Livni, managed to yank defeat from the jaws of victory after her party became the first in Israel’s history to win the largest number of seats in the Knesset and end up in the opposition; and, finally, the third Kadima leader Shaul Mofaz maneuvered his party into a 70-day session in Netanyahu’s government, where the latter taught him how winning is done: up close and brutally.

Tzachi Hanegbi, among the first Kadima members to openly start negotiations for an new “ox” is a flea’s flea. He enjoyed a kind of nobility status serving the Likud’s old guard, with his yichus as the son of Geual Cohen, the legendary radio broadcaster for the Lechi underground (the Stern gang, as the British called them). As such he was on a straight path to a top position in any Likud government.

Hanegbi was first elected to the Knesset in the 1988 elections, and headed the Prime Minister’s Bureau under Yitzhak Shamir—himself an old Lechi hand. In 1996 he became Minister of Justice in Netanyahu’s first government, which later made him the first former justice minister to stand trial (on election bribery, fraud and breach of trust). In 2010, the court, just as they have recently done in Olmert’s case, cleared Hanegbi of the charges except for one – perjury.

In the meantime, Hanegbi followed Sharon in flea fashion from Likud to the newly forged Kadima. It happened like this: Sharon broke away and created Kadima in November of 2005. Hanegbi was appointed interim Likud Chairman. He served for one day. Sharon offered him a better deal. After one day Hanegbi jumped oxes to Kadima.

Now, as the final Mofaz trick has all but assured the disappearance of Kadima into the place where Israeli political nightmare go to fester, Tzachi Hanegbi is looking to come home to the ox he left behind. He is older and more mature now, he can be an asset to Netanyahu in his field of expertise which appears to be doing whatever you need getting done.

Channel 2 News revealed last night that Hanegbi is leading a group of more than seven Kadima faction members in negotiations of returning to their original party, the Likud.

The gift these fleas in search of an ox are bringing is a promise to vote in favor of Netanyahu’s version of the Haredi draft law, which is essentially a somewhat enhanced version of the Tal law which the Supreme Court killed a few months ago.

The gift Netanyahu is dangling before his potential returnees is a ministerial portfolio for Tzachi Hanegbi, the Homefront Defense ministry, vacated by Matan Vilnai who became Israel’s ambassador to China.

While Hanegbi’s gang is packing a few key provisions for the short trip across the aisle, Tzipi Livni’s comrades in Kadima are also taking the suitcases down from the boydem as we speak, to join some new centrist party which political wizard Chaim Ramon has been cooking, possibly with leader wannabe Yair Lapid.

All these refugee boats (switching metaphors, there’s only so far you can take an ox, you know) are bound by a relatively new Knesset law which says that in order to jump ship and still hold on to their seat, there must be a minimum of seven MKs. So while it appears that Hanegbi already has a solid list of seven, Livni’s supporters have still not finalized their new alliances.

UPDATED: Bulgarians: Bomber Was a Jihadist Who Spent Time in Guantanamo

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

UPDATE: 7/19/12 10:46PM Sources are indicating that the Swedish national that was held in Guantanamo is not the Burgas bomber. As soon as we know more, we’ll update the report.

 

Bulgarian TV has announced that Medi Muhammad Ghezali, the suicide bomber who killed seven people on Wednesday, five of them Israelis, was member of the International Jihad who spent a year in Guantanamo Bay prison.

This may mean that PM Netanyahu’s accusation that Iran was behind the attack could be wrong.

Ghezali was arrested in Pakistan in 2009 along with his wife and a group of foreigners, including seven Turks, according to NRG.

Bulgarian officials are currently denying that Ghezali was the bomber.

Rav Yosef Shalom Elyashiv, ZTL – Baruch Dayan Emes

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

http://haemtza.blogspot.co.il/2012/07/rav-shalom-yosef-elyashiv-ztl-baruch.html

I am saddened to report the news of the death of a great man.  Rav Yosef Shalom Elyashiv passed away this morning at Shaare Tzedek Hospital surrounded by his family. He was 102 years old.

Rav Elyashiv was a Gadol. There is not a doubt in my mind about it. He belonged to the previous generation of Gedolim that included names like Rav Moshe Feinstein, Rav Aharon Kotler, Rav Yoshe Ber Sololveitchik (The Rav), the Lubavitcher Rebbi, and the Satmar Rebbe… and many more too numerous to mention.

These were all great men, Gedolim unlike anyone alive today – with the exception of Rav Ovadia Yosef, who is also in that category. Even though the Hashkafos of each and every single one of the aforementioned Gedolim are different – in some cases radically so, they were nonetheless great people who in effect changed the world.

Even though I found myself at times questioning some of the things that were said or done in Rav Elyashiv’s name, I completely honor his integrity. He like the other Gedolim of that era was a man of principle and never wavered from his convictions.

It is only a shame that near the end of his life there were some unscrupulous rabbis (Gadol Wannabees) who were able to get close to him – and took advantage of his advanced age to manipulate a desired Psak out of him. Or worse used his name without his permission or knowledge as a signatory to an edict or ban they (in their own arrogance and ignorance) only assumed he would have signed.

This does not detract from his greatness. It only diminishes those with ambitions and pretensions of succeeding him.

There are a lot of brilliant Talmidei Chachamim in the world today. Many of them are very worthy and principled people. But I don’t see anyone in a league to be able to take his place. He is the last of that generation. With all that is going on in the Jewish world today, the current rabbinic leadership seems to be falling well short of the task. They are not leading. They lead by constantly looking over their shoulder. The right shoulder.

I have said this before. The previous generation of Gedolim, of which Rav Elyashiv was a member, were in a class by themselves. They had continued a tradition of Gadlus that existed in pre-Holocaust times. They were ‘old school’ in the best sense of the word. With Rav Elyashiv’s passing that generation is almost gone.

It is true that every generation that is further removed from Sinai is of a lesser stature than their predecessors. That is no less true today than it was in the days of Chazal, the Rishonim, and Achronim. But there were major separations between those three eras. My Rebbeim have taught me that we are in the last such era. Achronim  - “the last ones” will no longer be offset by a new era the way it was from the era of the Rishonim.

I must confess, however, that from my vantage point the difference between Rav Elyashiv’s generation and today’s generation seems to have that same sort of chasm. But only history can judge that.

Rav Elyashiv will be sorely missed. Baruch Dayan Emes.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/haemtza/rav-yosef-shalom-elyashiv-ztl-baruch-dayan-emes/2012/07/19/

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