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October 25, 2016 / 23 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘building’

Conference Debating Bringing Holocaust Images to Life [video]

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Films from the Holocaust period are filled with haunting images, providing a rare opportunity for researchers to piece together the stories of lives cut brutally short. In today’s digital age, such film footage is particularly compelling and stirring, granting us a glimpse into a living memory of a world that was – and is no longer. A groundbreaking conference on the subject, the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) workshop entitled “Holocaust Archival Footage as a Historical Source: Methodology and Ethics in the Digital Era,” is currently taking place at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

EHRI is a trans-national project aimed at supporting and promoting improved access to Holocaust documentation scattered across the globe. The workshop, designed especially for experts, convened some 30 top level professionals, providing tools and tips for researchers and historians from Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the US and other countries in utilizing Holocaust-era footage as a historical source. Sessions included newly-discovered footage located at various archives and collections of Holocaust-related material; the unique challenges entailed in locating, collecting and restoring these rare films; and technical and methodological dilemmas of using of source movies.

One of the stories featured at the conference was about David Teitelbaum, an amateur photographer who was born in Wielopole Skrzyńskie, southeastern Poland, in 1891 and later relocated to the United States, where he became a successful businessman. Teitelbaum would return to his hometown almost every year to visit his family, and in 1938, he filmed his trip. In June or July 1939 he traveled to Wielopole again, but only stayed for a short time, sensing that war was imminent. Members of the Teitelbaum, Rappaport and Sartoria families, as well as their neighbors and acquaintances, were likely filmed during that last visit.

Several years ago, this rare color footage depicting Jewish life in the shtetl of Wielopole before the Holocaust was donated to Yad Vashem. With the assistance of relatives (particularly Channa Rachel Helen Glucksman, David Teitelbaum’s niece), Yad Vashem has succeeded in identifying many of the individuals in the film, including a number of sick or elderly Jews who were murdered in an aktion in the town.

Since the film was uploaded to Yad Vashem’s Youtube channel, it has been seen by over 130,000 viewers, many of whom have commented on how deeply moved they were to have caught a glimpse of Jewish life in the town before it was destroyed forever.

The Yad Vashem Archives house hundreds of Holocaust-related films, including raw footage, newsreels, amateur films, propaganda and feature films, and postwar trials. What makes this footage so unique is that it contains many layers of information beyond the recorded data – the personal backgrounds of the subjects, the historical context of the events depicted, and even the motivation and ideology of the photographer – all of which may be revealed through painstaking research.

Efrat Komisar, Head of the Film Footage Section at the Yad Vashem Archives and one of the presenters at the workshop, explained the importance of correct usage, critical research and cataloguing of film footage. “These wartime films have a complex nature, stemming, among other things, from the photographers’ intentions in creating the film in the first place. Nevertheless, they are invaluable as original documentation. The films open a window onto the world of their subjects, as well as that of their creators. They supplement information provided by other forms of documentation, as well as priceless visual testimony of people and places before, during and even immediately after the Shoah.

“Historians, researchers and filmmakers alike have an obligation to investigate these precious films thoroughly, and present them to the public together with the most comprehensive and accurate information possible, thus building a more accurate visual memory of the Holocaust,” Komisar continues. “Moving images provide something that other kinds of documentation – written, aural and even still photographs – cannot give: multisensory scenes of people, places and events that depict often very personal accounts in real-time. In a way, seeing them almost brings them back to life.”


Israel Begins Building Underground Barrier Along Gaza Border

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

The IDF has begun building a 70 kilometer long subterranean barrier along the Gaza border.

The concrete barrier, which is expected to take years to build and cost NIS 2 billion, will go to depth of a few meters underground and include advanced tunneling detection systems in case Hamas tries to dig below the wall.

The hope is that the barrier will block Hamas’s terror tunnels from crossing the border from Gaza, though Hamas has previously built tunnels that go dozens of meters underground into Israel.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Head of Search in TA Building Collapse, as 3rd Dead Discovered: Time Not on our Side

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

“Time is not on our side,” said Home Front Command chief for the Metropolitan Tel Aviv District Colonel Amir Ulu, who described the challenges facing hundreds of rescue workers at the collapsed building where three have died—the third victim discovered Tuesday morning—and 23 injured so far. On Monday night the rescuers lost contact with two victims who until then could be heard from under the layers of dirt and destruction. “The more time passes, the more problematic it becomes to find living victims, although in the past we’ve rescued collapse victims after 30 hours,” Ulu said.

Rescue worker with dog at the site of the building collapse September 5, 2016 in Ramat Hakhayal, Tel Aviv.

Rescue worker with dog at the site of the building collapse September 5, 2016 in Ramat Hakhayal, Tel Aviv.

As dark was setting at the collapsed, 4-story parking garage under construction in Ramat HaKhayal in north Tel Aviv, the rescue teams mapped the construction site, but the dimensions and sheer mass of the detritus and debris posed a significant difficulty. “It can take us hours to reach each one of the mapped areas,” Yonatan Raz, Ulu’s deputy, told Walla. “But the command’s decision is that we’re not leaving. We have the capacity to remain here for 48 hours, with the hope of finding trapped victims who are still alive.”

The rescuers believe there are four more people under the collapsed structure. Overnight the site was flooded with high voltage lights and shifts were changed frequently, to maintain the workers’ alertness. The rescuers are fearing additional collapses in two spots, which they continue to monitor. “The structure has stopped moving, which is good news,” Ulu said Tuesday morning.

Ulu related that only a week ago, commanders from the Home Front Corp, Police and MDA underwent a course intended to regulate communications between them in the event of a major disaster, “And here we are, applying what we’ve learned, unfortunately,” Ulu concluded.

David Israel

Bomb Blast Outside Brussels Police Building

Monday, August 29th, 2016

A bomb exploded outside the Brussels Institute of Criminology early Monday, RTL reported. There were no casualties. A car rammed through the building’s barriers at around 3 AM and one or more attackers exploded a bomb near the laboratories which caught fire.

David Israel

The Parsha Experiement – Va’etchanan: Building an Intimate Relationship with God

Thursday, August 18th, 2016
In this week’s parsha, Moses speaks, a lot – but it all seems so boring, and disconnected. The Torah is a book – and every sentence of that book fits together, like pieces in a puzzle. But how does that work, in this parsha? What is this parsha actually about?


This video is from Immanuel Shalev.
Link to last week:

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Immanuel Shalev

Shiloh Musings: Building With Jews and “LEGO”

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

It’s not quite Lego, but a lot of neighbors who are expanding their homes are not using bricks and cement at all. In Hebrew it’s known as בניה קלה bniyah kallah, easy or light construction. Except for a “shelter” made of poured cement, which is now required, it seems that buildings, or added rooms are specially coated styrofoam and plastic.

A new boys high school is opening in Shiloh in a few weeks, and it, too, is to be constructed from this stuff, as you can see. It’s mind-boggling how quickly even a large building can be constructed. This is amazing. In a few weeks it will be bustling with kids and staff. I can’t wait to go back in a few days to see the progress. Last week we just saw the large flat cement foundation “floor,” and now there are walls and doorways. Soon windows, roof and finishing, so you’d never know what’s underneath.

This new method can also be used in two or three storied homes. As you can see, it’s based on metal supports.  It’s so funny seeing these coated styrofoam sheets piled up on the side of the road. I guess that next week they will be in the shape of a building like this one:

And some people are also saving on roof tiling, as you can see here. This addition has a red painted roof. Besides being quicker and easier to construct, the tiles won’t fall off, because there aren’t any. A classic tiled room, as on the original house is very time-consuming and expensive to do. You also need highly skilled workers.

The skills and strength needed for this sort of building method versus the classic brick and cement is very different. Nowadays fewer construction is being done by Arabs in Shiloh. Also, when hiring Arabs, one needs an armed guard.

Once the construction is finished, it won’t look any different from a “regular” old-fashioned brick house, because the outside gets coated with a cement stucco finish. I recently spoke to the owner of this one to the right and bottom. He said that over the metal roof, which is specially insulated, they will have tiles. So, it’s going to be very hard to distinguish it from a brick building.

No doubt these new construction methods won’t last as long as our double-walled brick house, and I wonder about the flammability of them, too. No doubt that they will need all sorts of smoke detectors in each room. That’s what there is in Rami Levy and Yafiz, which are also constructed in this quick method.

I know that synthetic and wood construction, both rather flammable, is the norm in other parts of the world, but until now, most Israeli homes were safer -though more expensive per meter to build. If this helps people make affordable homes… who am I to complain?

Batya Medad

Israeli ‘Law and Order Bill’ Approved by Cabinet

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

The Israeli government approved on Sunday a new law described by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a bill to “increase and strengthen enforcement in the field of planning and construction.”

Dubbed by some as the “law and order bill,” the law is also being called the “one state, one law” bill, a measure Netanyahu says is intended to equalized enforcement of the laws across all populations.

“Our government is investing considerable resources in developing the Arab sector – economic development, education, transportation, housing solutions and other issues,” the prime minister said in opening remarks to the weekly cabinet meeting.

“Alongside all of these, we are working to create a reality of one state with one law; law and order for everyone, without exception. This is desirable and the time has come for it to be so in the State of Israel.”

One of the issues that may be addressed by this bill is the rage invariably provoked when police enforce demolition of illegal structures that are built by Arabs.

Illegal structures built by Jews are also demolished, and those demolitions provoke equal rancor but generally are completed with far less violence and danger to the engineers and/or security forces involved in the operation. Moreover, there are far fewer illegal structures built by Jews, and fewer Jewish squatters. The difference in the numbers and the response to enforcement of the laws is one of the driving forces behind the creation of the law.

A new division was also created in the Israel Police earlier this year with an eye towards law enforcement in the Arab sector.

This past April, Israel Police Chief Roni Alsheikh appointed the department’s first Muslim deputy commissioner-year-old Gemal Hakrush, the highest-ranking Muslim ever to serve in the force.

Hakrush heads a new Israel Police division to deal with law enforcement in the Arab sector, which comprises 20 percent of the nation’s population and where customs and culture codes are different, with Israeli police held in deep suspicion. In some areas, they are simply outright feared or hated, with Israeli Arab police officers considered “traitors.”

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israeli-law-and-order-bill-approved-by-cabinet/2016/07/24/

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