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July 29, 2016 / 23 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

What If They Commissioned an Anti-Settlements Exhibition and the Pictures Came Out Pastoral and Innocent?

Sunday, July 17th, 2016

Ragnar Kjartansson is a widely exhibited Icelandic performance artist. In a 2002 work called Death and the Children, he dressed up in a dark suit and carried a scythe, leading young children through a cemetery, answering their questions. In a 2006 live performance titled Sorrow Conquers Happiness, he wore a tuxedo and played the role of a 1940s nightclub crooner with an orchestra, singing, “Sorrow conquers happiness” over and over as the music swelled. In 2011, Kjartansson won the inaugural Malcolm Award at Performa 11, the visual art performance biennial, for his 12-hour work Bliss, which was performed without a break at the Abrons Arts Center on the Lower East Side of Manhattan with repeated performances of the finale of Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro,” the moment when the count gets down on one knee and asks his wife for forgiveness, which she grants in an aria. Icelandic tenor Kristjan Johannson played the count.

For his exhibition titled Architecture and Morality, at the Center for Contemporary Art in Tel Aviv this season, Kjartansson, according to a press release, was going to “create a new, ambitious body of paintings within the specific context of Israel. He will spend two weeks painting the urban landscapes in the West Bank ‘En plein air’ (a fancy French term the press release misspelled and which means ‘outdoors’) akin to his performative painting practice over the past few years.”

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

So Ragnar Kjartansson took his canvas and stand and paints and brushes and went en plein air to various Jewish settlements in Judea and Samaria, and what he brought back was, well, not so bad. He painted what he saw (a paraphrase on the New Yorker’s surrealist Gahan Wilson’s book of horror cartoons), and apparently he saw none of the blood curdling evil normally associated with the term “settlements” on the corner of south Tel Aviv’s Tsadok Hacohen and Kalisher Streets, which is where the CCA is located.

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Or, as Galia Yahav put it in Ha’aretz this weekend, “The houses are rendered separately, one per painting. All of them are drawn from the front and fill the canvas in the same way and from the same distance. The style is blatantly amateurish and naïve, as though from a hobby group, deliberately bland, with obedient brushstrokes and a filling of blank spaces, turgid coloration and pedantically mimetic attention to detail.”

But, most upsetting, from Yahav’s point of view, “the result is a small, suburban neighborhood of villas, completely artificial, in which little Israeli flags attached to parked cars wave in the breeze and larger ones flop from the windows of houses. Without addresses or names of specific settlements, this artistic tactic poses with feigned innocence in the likeness of a 19th-century pilgrimage, in which the Holy Land is portrayed through misty eyes.”

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

In other words, this cutting-edge performance artist, who was going to do to the settlements what Edvard Munch did the screaming, came away from those colonialist, apartheid-dispensing satanic neighborhoods with a fairly bland set of impressions, which is what one could expect from suburban bedroom communities anywhere.

“Perhaps the idea was to depict a generic quality of life rife with sated insensitivity – architecture as amorality,” Yahav tried to dig up some evil from under those middle class shaggy rugs. “Or perhaps it’s the realization of violent fantasy through painting: the occupied territories without Palestinians, a heaven on earth.”

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Ragnar Kjartansson settlements exhibition / Source: CCA Facebook

Curator Chen Tamir wrote that Kjartansson’s settlements paintings “tell a story about the banality of everyday life amid complex political turmoil.” Maybe. But it ain’t in those paintings. Indeed, Tamir conceded that the entire Kjartansson exhibition “is a bold statement on art’s futility in the face of social and political strife.”

Or maybe, just maybe, the Icelandic artist discovered and then made a point leftwing art critics can’t afford to admit: that things in those Jewish settlements and in all of Judea and Samaria, just aren’t nearly as bad as they are in many other, more troubled places, such as London, Paris, Brussels, Nice and Istanbul.

JNi.Media

Doomed EgyptAir Plane Debris Lands on Netanya Beach

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Parts of the downed EgyptAir Flight MS804 that crashed on May 19 washed up on the beach Thursday morning in Netanya.

The government informed officials in Cairo, according to the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO). It is expected the sections of the doomed aircraft will be returned to Egypt by the end of the week.

All 66 passengers and crew aboard the flight en route to Cairo from Paris were killed when the aircraft crashed in the Mediterranean Sea near a Greek island. Human remains were recovered over the past weeks by deep-sea ocean diver teams and brought to Alexandria.

Investigators have not ruled out terrorism, or anything else, due to the suddenness of the fire and smoke that raced through the bathroom and avionics area while the aircraft was cruising at an altitude of 38,000 feetin clear skies.

Data reflected the black box cockpit recordings indicates the pilots aboard the aircraft knew the fire had started and were trying to put it out when the plane went down.

Hana Levi Julian

Doomed EgyptAir Pilots Knew Fire Started, Tried to Put It Out

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

Pilots aboard the doomed EgyptAir Flight MS804 that crashed on May 19 near a Greek island in the Mediterranean Sea were aware of the fire that was racing through a bathroom and into the avionics area, and tried to put it out, according to U.S.-based ABC News and other international news agencies.

Speaking on condition of anonymity because an official statement is yet to be released, Egyptian investigators said Tuesday that recordings from the recovered “black box” cockpit voice recorder were consistent with previous data recovered from the wreckage of the plane.

Investigators have not ruled out terrorism — or anything — due to the suddenness of the fire and its magnitude, which flared while the aircraft was at 38,000 feet in clear skies.

Radar showed the plane suddenly turned 90 degrees left and then a full 360 degrees to the right before dropping to 15,000 feet. At 10,000 feet it disappeared from the radar. No distress call was ever made.

All 66 passengers and crew aboard the flight en route to Cairo from Paris were killed in the crash. Human remains were recovered by deep-sea ocean diver teams.

Hana Levi Julian

ISIS Car Bombing Kills 100+ in Baghdad, Third Attack in a Week

Sunday, July 3rd, 2016

For the third time in seven days, Da’esh (ISIS) terrorists murdered innocent civilians Sunday in a deadly suicide bombing at a shopping mall in a Shi’ite neighborhood in Baghdad, in another bid for world attention.

At least 115 people were killed, including 50 children, and nearly 200 more were injured when a car bomb exploded Saturday night, ripping through the multi-level shopping mall where stores and a gym were located.

According to Fox News, families were at a cafe Saturday night in the mall to share the Iftar meal (breaking the daily Ramadan fast) while watching this weekend’s Euro 2016 soccer tournament when the bomb exploded.

A second bomb blew up an outdoor market in southeastern Baghdad, leaving five dead and 16 injured.

Ironically, most of the victims wounded and killed by ISIS during the holiest month in the Islamic calendar were themselves Muslims.

Last Friday night in Bangladesh, at least 20 hostages and two police officers were brutally hacked to death in the Holey Artisan Bakery in Dhaka’s diplomatic district. The victims included three U.S. college students as well as Italians, Japanese, Bangladeshis, and one person from India.

Six terrorists came in at 8:45 pm with bags loaded with weaponry that included grenades and rifles, yelling Allahu Akbar! (the Islamic war cry, God is Great!). They were hunting foreigners, they told the restaurant staff, explaining locals were being contaminated with the foreign taste for alcohol and immodest clothing. More than 20 others were injured.

The Bangladesh government insists Da’esh was not involved in the attack, saying it was a local terrorist group; but ISIS has already taken responsibility for the slaughter.

Last Tuesday (June 28) three Da’esh terrorists also attacked Europe’s third-largest airport, the Ataturk International Airport in Istanbul, killing 44 people and wounding more than 140 others. One American suffered minor injuries, according to a U.S. official. But once again, most of the victims were Muslims.

Two of the three attackers were identified as Rakim Bulgarov and Vadim Osmanov, according to the official Turkish Anadolu news agency, quoting a source in the state prosecutor’s office who insisted on anonymity. The terrorists were reportedly from Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Russia. They infiltrated into Turkey via the Syrian border about a month prior, after arriving in Raqqa, the so-called “capital” of the self-declared caliphate of the terrorist group.

The team was allegedly directed by Ahmed Chatayev, according to U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, who told CNN the terrorist, known as “Ahmed One-Arm” is from the North Caucasus region in Russia. Chatayev is allegedly a top lieutenant for the minister of war for ISIS operations, CNN reported. The third attacker was not identified.

It was the eighth suicide bombing in Turkey in a nation which places a high premium on its tourism industry, a country which plays host to 39.4 million tourists each year.

The bombers entered the airport, opened fire and then detonated explosives vests — a slaughter strategy similar to that used by the ISIS terrorists during the attacks at the Paris Bataclan concert hall last November, and Belgium’s Zaventem International Airport in Brussels this past March.

Hana Levi Julian

El AL Flight to Paris Nearly Departs Without Air Marshals

Monday, June 27th, 2016

An El Al flight to Paris from Tel Aviv was forced to return to the terminal after it began making its way to the runway, according to a Channel 2 report.

According to the report, the flight’s security guards never got onto the airplane. When the staff realized the undercover guards weren’t there, the plane returned to the terminal to pick them

The plane took off an hour late, which is nothing too serious compared to the other delays El Al flights have been suffering over the past week.

At least they didn’t forget the pilot.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Hundreds of Jewish Leaders in First-Ever Jewish Agency Board of Governors Meetings in Paris

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

Hundreds of Jewish leaders from around the world will gather in Paris next week as the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel convenes in that city for the first time ever, in an unprecedented expression of solidarity with the French Jewish community.

French Minister of State for Relations with Parliament Jean-Marie Le Guen, Israeli Minister of Aliyah and Immigrant Absorption Sofa Landver, and Israeli Minister of Construction and Housing Yoav Gallant will address the gathering, as will Chairman of the Executive of the Jewish Agency for Israel Natan Sharansky, President of the CRIF (the umbrella of French Jewish communal organizations) Roger Cukierman, President of the Consistoire (the organization responsible for French Jewish religious affairs) Joël Mergui, and other leaders of the local Jewish community.

During the course of the three-day event (next Sunday through Tuesday), the Jewish Agency Board of Governors will join the Paris Jewish community at a special event at the Great Synagogue of Paris (La Victoire) bidding farewell to community members who will be making Aliyah this summer. Participants will also interact with French Jewish youth, receive a security briefing from the Jewish communal security service (SPCJ), and learn about the most pressing issues facing the community.

The event will end with the European finals of the 2016 International Bible Competition for Adults, hosted jointly by The Jewish Agency, the Government of Israel, and the World Zionist Organization.

Sharansky said in a statement: “This gathering of hundreds of Jewish leaders from around the world is the single greatest expression of the Jewish people’s solidarity with French Jewry. The Jewish Agency will continue to assist any French Jew who wishes to make his or her home in Israel while simultaneously doing everything in our power to ensure that Jewish life in France grows even stronger and more secure.”

France is home to the second-largest Jewish community in the world outside Israel, and Aliyah from France has topped the charts in recent years, with some 33,000 French Jews immigrating to Israel over the past decade, including 7,800 just last year. The Jewish Agency for Israel has increased significantly its presence in France, in order to handle the influx of French Jewish immigrants and has expanded specialized opportunities for French Jewish young people to experience life in Israel through the Masa Israel Journey and Onward Israel.

Among the unique Jewish Agency programs offered to the French Jewish community are Bac Bleu Blanc, a weeklong Israel experience program for French Jewish teens; Zayit, a Jewish identity curriculum taught in French Jewish schools; and a range of informational seminars and Aliyah opportunity fairs custom-designed for specific demographic groups within French Jewry. The Jewish Agency also helps French Jewish communal institutions provide for their security through the organization’s Emergency Assistance Fund for Jewish Communities, established in the wake of the Toulouse terror attack in 2012.

JNi.Media

Tamar Yonah Show – Tel Aviv, Orlando, Paris: Who’s Next for Islamic Terror? [audio]

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

A spate of terror attacks this last week spanning from Tel Aviv, to Orlando, to Paris… Where will it hit next? Tamar speaks with IQ Al Rassooli from Al-Rassooli.com, an Arab from Iraq who is an expert in the Koran, who talks about the Terrorist mindset.

Also, Sweden’s Saskia Pantell comes on to talk about the dangers Swedes face with the immigration of Muslims. With a population of just under 10 million people, and an immigrant population of a little over a million, this makes at least one out of ten Swedes from a mostly Islamic culture. Can Sweden survive such a high number of foreigners? Can Jewish Swedes feel safe when they only make up to 15,000-20,000 of its population?

Also, there’s been another attack in France, with a Parisian police officer brutally stabbed outside his home, and his wife’s throat slashed – by an Islamic attacker. When will this all stop, and what does the leadership of the West need to do to protect their citizens? Tamar expounds.

Tamar Yonah Show 14Jun – PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/multimedia/israel-news-talk-radio/tamar-yonah-show/tamar-yonah-show-tel-aviv-orlando-paris-whos-next-for-islamic-terror-audio/2016/06/16/

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