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July 27, 2016 / 21 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Salafi’

Tel Sheva Arab Student Indicted on Terror Conspiracy After Return From Jordan

Monday, February 8th, 2016

A 20-year-old Tel Sheva student, working as a substitute teacher, has been indicted on charges of conspiring with Salafi jihadists from various Arab nations.

The indictment was submitted Monday following a joint investigation by Israel Police and the Shin Bet Israel Security Service.

The Tel Sheva suspect indicted Monday allegedly agreed to help “jihadist activists” infiltrate Israel, according to the Shin Bet. He is also accused of having joined the ‘Salafi Jihadist’ organization.

“Three weeks ago, on January 18, the suspect was arrested upon his return from Jordan and was transferred for interrogation. During the investigation it was found that after leaving for Jordan the suspect made contact with a jihad operative from Tunisia.” The suspect is accused of agreeing to help the operative infiltrate Israel and conspiring to carry out military operations in Israel.

“It was also found that during this period he agreed to join the Salafi Jihad organization,” the Shin Bet said in its statement.

“During the course of the investigation the suspect revealed his connections to the organization and after the evidence was established, the indictment was submitted by the Southern District prosecutor,” the statement continued. The police have requested an extension of the suspect’s remand until the proceedings have been completed.

The Shin Bet issued a warning last year that some Israeli Arab students traveling abroad have been returning with unpleasantly new knowledge acquired outside their classes.

Israeli Arab students are increasingly becoming radicalized while touring or studying abroad, according to the Shin Bet.

Operatives from Da’esh (ISIS) and other terror groups have been recruiting Israeli Arabs while they are attending foreign universities in countries such as Jordan and Saudi Arabia.

Tel Sheva is a Bedouin township in the northern Negev. However, not all those living in the town are Bedouin. Some of the residents have intermarried with Palestinian Authority Arabs and others.

Most of the Bedouin in the northern Negev are Sunni Muslims. Salafi Islam is associated with groups that lean toward the teachings of Al Qaeda. It was the Salafis who were challenging Hamas in a power struggle for control over Gaza, for instance, until Da’esh (ISIS) arrived in the region.

Hana Levi Julian

Downpour Sinks Another Terror Tunnel, Buries Gaza Diggers Alive

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016

While Israelis were welcoming the rain to feed the parched earth — even though it caused power outages and shut down operations throughout the country — Gaza’s water-logged sands became a muddy mass grave for cold, wet Hamas terror tunnel diggers.

Jews pray three times a day for rain to assure the Creator’s promise to give “rain for your land at the proper time, the early rain and the late rain.” Otherwise, God warns He “will close the heavens so that there will be no rain and the earth will not yield its produce…” (Deuteronomy 11:13-21)

It’s more than enough reason to pray, and pray they do. In return, Heaven sent a three-day howler this week that showered down everything with gale-force winds, from snow to sleet to hail to rain, from Metullah and the Golan Heights straight down south to the Negev, and Gaza.

Officials at Israel’s Water Authority were pleased to see that the water level in Lake Kinneret (Israel’s primary source of drinking water) rose three centimeters. Elsewhere around Israel green things began popping up as well.

But there was a holy disaster down south where the water-logged sands of Gaza sank under the weight of the downpour. A second terror tunnel being built in the area of Jabalya collapsed on the hapless diggers who were being forced to continue their labors despite the bad weather.

Numerous local sources confided in tweets on social media that the worsening weather had also caused flooding in nearly all the homes and caravans in the area.

Eight are reported dead so far, three others were dragged out, badly injured. Contact with the Hamas diggers was lost Tuesday night, according to Palestinian Authority media. Their bodies were dragged out from the mud and brought to Shifa Hospital in Gaza City, Walla! News reported.

But the official Gaza government is trying to keep the news of the deaths under wraps. Not even one new announcement of an al-Qassam “wedding” appears on the Hamas military wing’s Iz a-Din al-Qassam website — unlike the death of its lone digger on Saturday. On Sunday, Hamas proudly posted a notice about the death of Mohammed Ashour al-Naj’ar, 31, on the homepage of its military website. “Al Qassam Brigades wed Mukahid Mohammed al-Najjar, who ascended after the collapse of the tunnel for the resistance,” the group announced.

After Tuesday’s cave-in a spokesperson for the Gaza Ministry of Health entirely denied the deaths, saying no bodies were brought to the hospital after the collapse.

Likewise, a security source linked to Hamas told foreign journalists the eight diggers were still missing, according to a report published Wednesday in Lebanon’s Daily Star. “The resistance tunnel collapsed last night due to the weather and flooding,” the source said. “There were 11 resistance men inside. Three of them escaped in the first hour after the accident, but the security operation… continues to search for the eight others.”

It’s important for Hamas to keep its “fighters” building those tunnels. Iran has sent tens of millions of dollars to help rebuild its underground terror tunnel network. This way Hamas and its ally, the Palestinian Islamic Jihad can wage another proxy war against Israel on behalf of Tehran.

 

Who loves you, baby?

Hana Levi Julian

Shin Bet Sting Nabs Israeli Arabs Joining Al Qaeda, ISIS

Friday, January 30th, 2015

A growing number of Arab Israelis are disappearing from their homes and jobs to run off to Syria to “fight in the jihad,” joining up with Al Qaeda and ISIS-linked terror groups.

Then they are sent back to start cells of their own under the direction of Al Qaeda’s local Syrian branch, Jabhat al Nusra, or pledge their allegiance to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria — ISIS — itself.

Most get caught — like those who were indicted this month in district courts in the north and south of Israel.

One Israeli Arab who decided to go to Syria and join the Al Qaeda-linked Jabhat al Nusra terror organization didn’t really manage to get very far.

According to court papers filed in an indictment Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015 Amin Ahmed Salah Snobar, age 24, was arrested this month as soon as he arrived at Ben Gurion International Airport (Jan. 2) on a flight from Turkey.

Most wannabe terror recruits have been entering Syria via the border with Turkey. Israeli Arabs are no exception. It is impossible to penetrate Israel’s border with Lebanon or Syria without permission from either side and since both are still technically at war with the Jewish State, that isn’t happening unless there is an outstanding diplomatic purpose. Joining a global jihad organization doesn’t fall under that category.

Snobar, a resident of the northern village of Kfar Yassif, told interrogators from the Israel Security Agency (ISA/Shin Bet) that he left Israel on July 7, 2014 to join up with the radical Islamist rebels fighting Syrian government forces. Upon his arrival in Syria, he first spent time at a base run by the Ansar al-Sham rebel group, then he moved over to the Al Qaeda-linked Jabhat al Nusra, according to court documents. Snobar allegedly went through military training with both groups, learning about weapons and how to make bombs. He was put through a rigorous physical fitness program and then sent out on special missions.

“During his time in Syria … he was in touch with a number of elements who suggested to him, on a number of occasions, that it would be preferable for him to return to Israel and carry out attacks in Israel, or fight against it from within,” Thursday’s court papers stated.

According to the charge sheet submitted by northern district prosecutors at the Haifa District Court, Snobar received training in combat and underground warfare. He also was instructed on how to work in cells, how to arrive at destinations and how to operate firearms. He allegedly carried out armed patrols of Jabhat al-Nusra terrorist bases and underwent a training course in the use of heavy machine guns. He also allegedly learned how to load, aim and fire an RPG (rocket-propelled grenade) and handled a sniper rifle on multiple occasions.

The Shin Bet said that six months after arriving in Syria Snobar “decided to return to his family, retracing his path to Turkey and from there boarding a flight to Israel. Upon his return to Israel he was arrested at Ben Gurion International Airport and taken for Shin Bet questioning.”

Jabhat al Nusra was outlawed by the State of Israel, the ISA reminded in its communique to media. From June 2013 the group became the official Al Qaeda branch in Syria. Part of its charter calls for attacks on Israel.

“The phenomenon of Arab Israelis traveling to Syria is extremely grave and dangerous, as the Syrian arena is rife with active elements hostile to the State of Israel, with a focus on the global jihad operatives,” said the statement by the Shin Bet. “Arab Israelis who travel to this arena undergo military training and are exposed to extreme jihadist ideology. There is a concern that they will be exploited by terrorist elements to carry out military activity against Israel and gather information on targets in Israel.”

The phenomenon is certainly “grave and dangerous” but it is also becoming more and more common, creating a rising risk for those who employ Israeli Arabs as well as those who employ Palestinian Authority Arabs with legitimate working permits.

Less than two weeks ago, seven Israeli Arabs were indicted in the Haifa District Court – including an attorney from Nazareth who worked as a public defender – for allegedly attempting to set up a cell for the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in Israel. An eighth suspect with the group was indicted separately due to geographic considerations.

The seven suspects were identified as: Attorney Adnan Aladin, 40; Hasam Marisat, 30, a former security prisoner from Deir Hana; Karim Abu Tzala, 22; Ala’a Abu Tzala, 27; Halad Abu Tzahalh, 30; Sarif Khaled Abu Tzala, 29; and Muhammad Abu Tzala, 27, the latter training to become a pharmacist at the time of his arrest, according to the Shin Bet.

The eighth suspect, Omer Koush, was indicted separately on December 18 and arraigned December 29, 2014 in the Be’er Sheva District Court by the Southern District Attorney’s Office. Koush, a resident of a Bedouin village in the south, had recently finished medical studies in Jordan and was recruiting fighters for ISIS, the Shin Bet said.

The other seven were picked up in a joint Shin Bet-Israel Police operation in November and December of last year, although information on the case was held under a gag order until the indictment was filed this month. All seven confessed to having worked together since June 2014 to form a “Salafi Jihadist” group and had pledged allegiance to ISIS. They were part of a terror attack plot that targeted the Druze community in Israel as well as security personnel and others, the Shin Bet said.

A well-known radical Islamist Salafi cleric in northern Israel with whom they met on multiple occasions had called on the group to recruit more men to the cause, according to the Shin Bet. They learned how to make firebombs and also purchased sheep in order to practice slaughtering and to build up their tolerance for “slaughtering infidels in Syria,” according to the indictment.

Aladin referred to himself as the “commander of ISIS in Palestine,” the Shin Bet said, inciting the other members of the group to participate in terror attacks against Jews and to prepare them for their jihad. He was fired from his job with the Public Defender’s Office in July 2014 after uploading a Facebook post praising an alleged Islamic hadith on killing Jews.

The other six suspects, who are residents of Sakhnin, face charges of attempted contact with a foreign agent, membership and activity in a banned organization (ISIS was outlawed in September 2014 by Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon) and aiding a terrorist organization. All had planned eventually to fight in Syria.

Rachel Levy

What Egypt’s President Sisi Really Thinks

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

{Originally posted at Middle East Forum website}

Former air marshal Husni Mubarak, now 86, had ruled Egypt for thirty years when his military colleagues forced him from office in 2011. Three years and many upheavals later, those same colleagues replaced his successor with retired field marshal Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, 59. The country, in short, made a grand round-trip, going from military ruler to military ruler, simply dropping down a generation.

This return raises basic questions: After all the hubbub, how much has actually changed? Does Sisi differ from Mubarak, for example, in such crucial matters as attitudes toward democracy and Islam, or is he but a younger clone?

Sisi remains something of a mystery. He plays his cards close to the vest; one observer who watched his presidential inaugural speech on television on June 8 described it as “loaded with platitudes and very long.”[1] He left few traces as he zoomed through the ranks in three years, going from director of Military Intelligence and Reconnaissance to become the youngest member of the ruling military council and, then, rapidly ascending to chief of staff, defense minister, and president.

Sisi makes two main arguments: Democracy is good for the Middle East; and for it to succeed, many conditions must first be achieved.

Fortunately, a document exists that reveals Sisi’s views from well before his presidency: An essay dated March 2006, when he attended the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. His 5,000-word English-language term paper, “Democracy in the Middle East,”[2] has minimal intrinsic value but holds enormous interest by providing the candid views of an obscure brigadier general soon and unexpectedly to be elected pharaoh of Egypt.

While one cannot discount careerism in a term paper, Sisi’s generally assertive and opinionated tone—as well as his negative comments about the United States and the Mubarak regime—suggest that he expressed himself freely.

In the paper, Sisi makes two main arguments: Democracy is good for the Middle East; and for it to succeed, many conditions must first be achieved. Sisi discusses other topics as well, which offer valuable insights into his thinking.

Democracy Is Good for the Middle East

Sisi endorses democracy for practical, rather than philosophical, reasons: It just works better than a dictatorship. “Many in the Middle East feel that current and previous autocratic governments have not produced the expected progress.”[3] Democracy has other benefits, as well: It reduces unhappiness with government and narrows the vast gap between ruler and ruled, both of which he sees contributing to the region’s backwardness. In all, democracy can ac- complish much for the region and those who promote it “do have an opportunity now in the Middle East.”

In parallel, Sisi accepts the free market because it works better than socialism: “[M]any Middle East countries attempted to sustain government-controlled markets instead of free markets and as a result no incentive developed to drive the economy.”

It is reasonable, even predictable that Gen. Sisi would view democracy and free markets in terms of their efficacy. But without a genuine commitment to these systems, will President Sisi carry through with them, even at the expense of his own power and the profits from the socialized military industries run by his former colleagues?[4] His 2006 paper implies only a superficial devotion to democracy; and some of his actions since assuming power (such as returning to appointed rather than elected university deans and chairmen[5]) do not auger well for democracy.

Conditions for Democracy to Succeed in the Middle East

Sisi lays down three requirements for democracy to succeed in the Middle East:

Daniel Pipes

Ya’alon Says Hamas Uninterested in Further Escalation

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon told residents of southern Israeli communities living near the border with Gaza that Hamas terrorists do not want a war with Israel.

“Hamas is not interested in further escalation and is relaying these messages through Egypt,” Ya’alon told residents with whom he met on Monday.

“The rocket fire is unacceptable,” he continued. “Hamas operates most of the year against the sources that launch these attacks [against Israel] and enforces the understandings reached after Operation Pillar of Defense.”

For some time, Gaza’s Hamas rulers have been engaged in a quiet power struggle of their own for control over the region. Al Qaeda-linked Salafi Muslim terrorist groups have been growing in popularity among more radical members of Hamas and have begun to openly challenge the organization for control over Gaza.

Nevertheless, Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu warned over the weekend after a massive barrage of rocket attacks launched at southern Israel that if Hamas could not the rocket fire, Israel would be forced to do so.

Hana Levi Julian

Islam and its Infidels

Monday, May 20th, 2013

What motives lay behind last month’s Boston Marathon bombing and the would-be attack on a VIA Rail Canada train?

Leftists and establishmentarians variously offer imprecise and tired replies – such as “violent extremism” or anger at Western imperialism – unworthy of serious discussion. Conservatives, in contrast, engage in a lively and serious debate among themselves: some say Islam the religion provides motive, others say it’s a modern extremist variant of the religion, known as radical Islam or Islamism.

As a participant in the latter debate, here’s my argument for focusing on Islamism.

Those focusing on Islam itself as the problem (such as ex-Muslims like Wafa Sultan and Ayaan Hirsi Ali) point to the consistency from Muhammad’s life and the contents of the Koran and Hadith to current Muslim practice. Agreeing with Geert Wilders’ film Fitna, they point to striking continuities between Koranic verses and jihad actions. They quote Islamic scriptures to establish the centrality of Muslim supremacism, jihad and misogyny, concluding that a moderate form of Islam is impossible. They point to Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan‘s deriding the very idea of a moderate Islam. Their killer question is, “Was Muhammad a Muslim or an Islamist?” They contend that we who blame Islamism do so out of political correctness or cowardliness.

To which, we reply: Yes, certain continuities do exist; and Islamists definitely follow the Koran and Hadith literally. Moderate Muslims exist but lack Islamists’ near-hegemonic power. Erdoğan’s denial of moderate Islam points to a curious overlap between Islamism and the anti-Islam viewpoint. Muhammad was a plain Muslim, not an Islamist, for the latter concept dates back only to the 1920s. And no, we are not cowardly but offer our true analysis.

And that analysis goes like this:

Islam is the fourteen-century-old faith of a billion-plus believers that includes everyone from quietist Sufis to violent jihadis. Muslims achieved remarkable military, economic, and cultural success between roughly 600 and 1200 c.e. Being a Muslim then meant belonging to a winning team, a fact that broadly inspired Muslims to associate their faith with mundane success. Those memories of medieval glory remain not just alive but central to believers’ confidence in Islam and in themselves as Muslims.

Major dissonance began around 1800, when Muslims unexpectedly lost wars, markets, and cultural leadership to Western Europeans. It continues today, as Muslims bunch toward the bottom of nearly every index of achievement. This shift has caused massive confusion and anger. What went wrong, why did God seemingly abandon His faithful? The unbearable divergence between premodern accomplishment and modern failure brought about trauma.

Muslims have responded to this crisis in three main ways. Secularists want Muslims to ditch the Shari’a (Islamic law) and emulate the West. Apologists also emulate the West but pretend that in doing so they are following the Shari’a. Islamists reject the West in favor of a retrograde and full application of the Shari’a.

Islamists loathe the West because of its being tantamount to Christendom, the historic archenemy, and its vast influence over Muslims. Islamism inspires a drive to reject, defeat, and subjugate Western civilization. Despite this urge, Islamists absorb Western influences, including the concept of ideology. Indeed, Islamism represents the transformation of Islamic faith into a political ideology. Islamism accurately indicates an Islamic-flavored version of radical utopianism, an -ism like other -isms, comparable to fascism and communism. Aping those two movements, for example, Islamism relies heavily on conspiracy theories to interpret the world, on the state to advance its ambitions, and on brutal means to attain its goals.

Supported by 10-15 percent of Muslims,* Islamism draws on devoted and skilled cadres who have an impact far beyond their limited numbers. It poses the threat to civilized life in Iran, Egypt, and not just on the streets of Boston but also in Western schools, parliaments, and courtrooms.

Our killer question is “How do you propose to defeat Islamism?” Those who make all Islam their enemy not only succumb to a simplistic and essentialist illusion but they lack any mechanism to defeat it. We who focus on Islamism see World War II and the Cold War as models for subduing the third totalitarianism. We understand that radical Islam is the problem and moderate Islam is the solution. We work with anti-Islamist Muslims to vanquish a common scourge. We will triumph over this new variant of barbarism so that a modern form of Islam can emerge.

Daniel Pipes

Gaza Arabs Celebrate Boston Marathon Attack with Dance, Candies

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

Shortly after the bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon, the Arabs of Gaza danced in the streets, handing out candies to passersby, Israel News Agency reported.

Mohammad al-Chalabi, head of a Jordanian Salafi group, said on Tuesday that he was “happy to see the horror in America’ after the explosions in Boston,” the Daily Mail reported. “American blood isn’t more precious than Muslim blood,” al-Chalabi added. “Let the Americans feel the pain we endured by their armies occupying Iraq and Afghanistan and killing our people there,”

According to the Christian Science Monitor, Somalia’s Al Shabaab mocked the blast victims on its official Twitter feed, and used the attack as an opportunity to criticize U.S. policy. “The #BostonBombings are just a tiny fraction of what US soldiers inflict upon millions of innocent Muslims across the globe on a daily basis,” read one tweet.

Pundit Juan Cole noted that Monday bombings and other mass violence also killed dozens of civilians in Syria and Iraq. The world is stitched together, he wrote, by the common human experiences of sorrow and grief that follow such tragedies.

Al Jazeera’s Khaled A Beydoun, under the headline “Boston explosions: ‘Please don’t be Arabs or Muslims,'” wrote:

The knots in my stomach tightened with preliminary reports from the New York Post that Boston Police had seized a “Saudi National”. In a media nanosecond, “Muslims” was trending on Twitter, additional news providers corroborated the reports, and the hatemongering ensued.

Yori Yanover

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/gaza-arabs-celebrate-boston-marathon-attack-with-dance-candies/2013/04/17/

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