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April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Shiloh’

Arabs Destroy 2.5 Acres of Vineyard in Samaria, Locals Say

Monday, February 18th, 2013

Some 3,000 vines, situated near Shiloh in Samaria, were destroyed over the past few days, it was discovered this morning.

The vineyards are visited every few days during this season, so the precise time of the destruction is unclear.

The damage is estimated at 200,000 NIS.

Footprints leading to the Arab village of Kutzrah were discovered by IDF trackers during their initial investigation. About a year ago, a 1/4 of an acre was destroyed in the same vineyard.

“This morning we discovered the difficult scene of some 3,000 destroyed vines,” Itamar Weiss, a worker at the vineyards, told Tazpit News Agency. “This is the fourth time this vineyard has been targeted in the past years.”

Israeli Police said an investigation has been launched to discover the culprits.

Weiss said that residents “expect these crimes to be treated with the same force that crimes throughput the rest of Israel are treated and investigated.”

This incident is one of many attacks apparently executed by Arabs against Jewish agriculture and farming in Judea and Samaria.

In the beginning of November 2012, Tazpit News Agency reported that a herd of some 400 goats was stolen from Avraham Hertzlich, a farmer from the Benyamin area.

An olive grove near Shiloh, owned by Erez Ben Sa’adon, was vandalized at around the same time. Many of the trees were uprooted or cut down, and the irrigation system was damaged.

About a month ago, 70 heads of sheep were stolen from a pen in Sussia.

Adar Prayers in Shiloh

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

As is my longtime custom, I went to שילה הקדומה Shiloh HaKeduma, Tel Shiloh to pray on Rosh Chodesh Adar.  Considering the problems Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu is having constructing/negotiating his latest coalition, maybe he should go to Tel Shiloh, site of the Mishkan, Tabernacle to pray, too. 

Biblical Chana prayed in Shiloh for a son who would be the national and spiritual leader of the Jewish People to establish monarchy.  So, considering the state of our nation today, Shiloh is the perfect location for prayers.

The Jewish Month of Adar is known as a time of change, reversals, bad to good, winter to spring.

Yes, I was amazed at how richly the trees were in bloom and how beautifully the wildflowers had begun to cover the ground.  Last month, Rosh Chodesh Shvat, we saw green and brown, but now we also see red, pink and white.

Shiloh has been the location for prayer since Joshua made it the capital of the Jewish Nation after the Exodus from Egypt.  The Mishkan, Tabernacle, which had been a mobile synagogue during the forty years we wandered the desert, was set up in Shiloh and stayed there for 369 years.

That location, a large flat area to the north is now being excavated by archaeologists.

Wherever you look you can see signs of ancient building and construction.  Stones don’t naturally look like these.

 

Next Rosh Chodesh is Nissan.  Women are invited to join us for Women’s Rosh Chodesh Prayers.

Women’s Prayers at Tel Shiloh
Rosh Chodesh Nissan
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
1 Nissan 5773 8:30am
Tour of Tel & Dvar Torah, Short Torah Lesson
Please come and invite family, friends and neighbors.
And don’t forget that the Tel Shiloh, aka Shiloh HaKedumah is open for visitors six days a week. For information call 02-994-4019.
New and old observation towers, plus ancient ruins at Tel Shiloh

Visit Shiloh Musings.

IDF Clash with Border Police for Shooting at Jews

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

On Tuesday afternoon, clashes resumed in the village of Esh Kodesh, after Israeli Border Police permitted nearby Arabs to plow the land between the settlements of Esh Kodesh and Achiah, Hakol Hayehudi reported.

Named after the Piaseczna Rebbe, the renowned spiritual leader of many Chassidim in Auschwitz, Esh Kodesh is a 22-family village overlooking the Jordan Valley (2400 ft above sea level), some 25 miles north-east of Jerusalem. Its neighbor Achiah is another 22-family village.

The Esh Kodesh residents have argued that it shouldn’t take dozens of Arabs to plow one field – one tractor could do the job quite proficiently. Also, seeing as it is well past the plowing and sowing season, they view the “plowing” as nothing more than sheer provocation on the part of their Arab neighbors, and a clear threat to the security of their village.

Residents of the community along with many supporters, who have endured severe clashes with the police earlier in the day, returned en masse to the disputed area and tried to prevent the plowing with their bodies. As usual, the Jewish locals were treated brutally by the border cops, who fired tear gas and stun grenades directly into the group of Jewish civilians, which included women, children and babies.

A group of IDF reservists who had been ordered to the area to secure the plowing Arabs, ended up defending the Jewish civilians from the cops.

“A Druze Border Police officer named Yusuf commanded the event and totally freaked out,” said a resident of Esh Kodesh to Hakol Hayehudi. “He fired tear gas canisters into a group of women and children and used severe violence. At some point a large group of reserve soldiers arrived and once they saw what was happening, they started shouting at the Border Police: ‘Are you crazy? Are you screwed in the brain?’ and demanded that they stop firing on children.”

According to the residents, the police officers themselves then started to debate their own conduct. “The soldiers shouted at them: ‘We are one nation,’ and ‘Look who you’re shooting at,’ and more talk like that, and they became confused and started arguing among themselves.”

One resident related that the debate between the soldiers and the border cops grew louder and turned into mutual cursing. “At some point, the Border Police just became too annoyed at the soldiers and told them: Let’s see you get by here by yourselves, climbed into their jeeps and drove off,” he said.

The Arabs, who had only managed to plow a few meters, saw that they were deserted by their security guards and began to flee. “Once they no longer had the backing of this Druze officer, the Arabs simply turned around and drove quickly away,” said one resident.

In earlier incidents, four Jews were arrested in clashes in the area. An Esh Kodesh resident was arrested by border policemen in the most brutal and violent manner, and later a resident of Givat Gulat Zion was arrested after being asked to present an ID card by police detectives who positioned road barriers separating the settlements of Gush Shilo. Two boys were also arrested, one because the cops claimed he was wanted for questioning, and the other after he refused to show his ID card. Both were released after a few hours, according to the Honenu legal aid society.

During the clashes Jews shattered the windows of a car owned by an Arab who was driving on the country road connecting the villages of Kotzra and Jalud. The driver was sprayed with pepper gas and sustained injuries from stones thrown at him. He was evacuated for medical treatment. The Arabs of Jalud also complained that some Jews had cut down a number of olive trees near their village.

The IDF informed the Jewish residents that the Arab plowing of the fields near their community will continue despite their protests. The residents, for their part, are preparing additional days of clashes and call upon all those who care about the village’s security to come to the area and help prevent the plowing.

Jewish ‘Valentine’s Day’ Finds Ancient Roots in Biblical Shiloh

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Over 3,000 years ago, an ancient Jewish holiday was celebrated by the maidens of Israel. Dressed in white, the daughters of Israel would dance in the vineyards where men would choose them as their wives on the Fifteenth of Av, known as Tu B’Av.  Soon-to-be brides would dance in the community of Shiloh in Samaria, the temporary capital of Israel before the first Temple was built in Jerusalem.

The holiday celebrates many happy events that happened during this time in the course of Jewish history, some which were associated with the Temple in Jerusalem.

“Tu B’Av , however, has a much deeper significance than just an Israeli Valentine’s Day,”  according to Tamar Asraf, the spokeswoman of the Binyamin Council.

“In the very beginning, this ancient holiday was more of a local custom than a national one,” Asraf told Tazpit News Agency.  “The holiday gained national significance when members of the Benjamin tribe, who were forbidden to marry outside the tribe following the Pilegesh B’Givah incident and the Civil War that ensued, were once again allowed to marry into the the nation on the fifteenth of Av during the period of Judges.”

“This is a holiday that signifies not only love, but marriage and the continuation of the Jewish home during times of crisis and challenge in the history of our people,” said Asraf.

The Mishnah explains that “there were no holidays so joyous for the Jewish People as the Fifteenth of Av and Yom HaKippurim, for on those days, daughters of Jerusalem would go out dressed in borrowed white clothing…so as not to embarrass those who didn’t have.” Tu B’Av was instituted in the Second Temple period to mark the beginning of the grape harvest which ended on Yom Kippur.

Following the establishment of the modern state of Israel, Tu B’Av was revived as a national holiday celebrated across the country. In the modern day community of Shiloh, located in the Binyamin region, about 30 minutes north of Jerusalem, Tu B’Av’s historical and traditional elements play a central role in celebrations.

For the past four years, the Regional Council and Binyamin Tourism have hosted an annual Tu B’Av “Dancing in the Vineyards Festival” which features Jewish dance and music for women. Live concerts, dance workshops and of course the traditional dancing in the vineyards of Shiloh are some of the main features of the evening set near the remnants of the biblical Shiloh city.

Avital Horesh, the festival’s artistic director said that organizers, who spent months preparing for the event, expect over 1,000 women from all over Israel to attend. “Last year we had 1,000 religious women attend from all sectors in Israel, both religious, non-religious. This year we expect even more—close to 1,500.”

There will be a number of different dance workshops available including hip hop, Oriental dance, and African dance. A concert will be held after featuring well known Israeli singers from religious and non-religious backgrounds.

“The underlying idea of the festival is to bring women together from all parts of Israeli society to celebrate an ancient tradition that brought our nation closer together thousands of years ago. It’s sharing an age-old national message of reconnecting to our roots and traditions–accessible to anyone no matter their religious background,” concludes Asraf.

Israel Approves 695 New Housing Units in Sister Settlements Shilo and Shvut Rachel

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Israel gave preliminary approval on Wednesday to a plan to build 695 new homes in two neighboring settlements deep inside Judea and Samaria, drawing instantaneous rebuke from the United Nations and the Palestinians, and possibly threatening Israel’s relations with the U.S. a few weeks before Prime Minister Netanyahu’s scheduled visit to the White House.

Israeli defense officials played down the decision, suggesting construction won’t start for years.

The U.N.’s Mideast envoy, Robert Serry, called the Israeli announcement “deplorable” and said it “moves us further away from the goal of a two-state solution.”

Yariv Oppenheimer, director of Peace Now, which tracks and publicizes settlement construction, called it the biggest settlement construction plan since Netanyahu took office three years ago.

If you put it that way, it actually sounds quite modest…

Palestinian spokesman Ghassan Khatib said Wednesday’s announcement “shows how Israel has no respect for the international community or international laws, while at the same time it sheds a light on the lack of effective actions by international community toward Israeli settlement policy.”

In January, 1978, a modern community was established on deserted land adjacent to the ancient biblical site, now called Tel Shilo, when a group affiliated with Gush Emunim arrived at the location to assert revenant rights. In 1979, the Israeli government officially authorized Shiloh’s status as a recognized village, administrated by the Mateh Binyamin Regional Council.

Shvut Rachel is named after Rachela Druk, a resident of Shiloh and mother of 7, and bus-driver Isaak Rofe, who were killed by terrorist fire in November, 1991. That same night a group of people settled at the place of the murder, today’s Rechelim. A little later, on the night of the two victims’ funerals, a group of students from the Shiloh Yeshiva founded Shvut Rachel in the name of the victims. Since then, Shvut Rachel has been growing and is of now teeming with life.

Tel Shiloh Declared a National Heritage Site

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

The Israeli Government has approved ten projects promoting sites of historical significance, including an archeological site in Tel Shiloh, in the Binyamin region of Samaria.

These promotional projects will allocate millions of Shekels to the rehabilitation and development of the sites. All the sites are of historic and Jewish significance.

Shiloh housed the Mishkan – the Tabernacle – during the period of the Judges, and essentially served as Israel’s capital in the 13th century BCE. It was destroyed some time before the establishment of the First Israelite commonwealth. Archeological findings at the site indicate that the area was inhabited in later periods as well, including during the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine periods. A visitor’s center was established there a few years ago, to facilitate study of the Tabernacle. Tens of thousands of people visit the site every year.

To date, there have been only minor excavations at the site, with no comprehensive and thorough uncovering of the entire ancient city. This new promotional project will enable the completion of archeological diggings. An educational center will also be established to focus on the biblical events that occurred here thousands of years ago.

The National Heritage Site program was initiated two years ago, and is intended to preserve, rehabilitate and reconstruct sites of historical Jewish and Zionist importance. Thirty sites, including Tel Arad, the Herodium, and Beit Ha’Aztmaut in Tel Aviv, will receive this special dispensation, ensuring that their national and educational value are properly presented to the public, while cultivating the national identity of the state and preserving a unique history for generations to come.

Tamar Asraf, Binyamin and Shiloh’s spokeswoman, told Tazpit: “We are very happy that the government has come to this decision. We think it is a worthy and proper development, as Shiloh was the capital city of the first commonwealth. The site has earned its place in this distinguished list as a result of its significance”.

Cyber Attacks UPDATE: Shiloh Community Website Hacked; Azerbaijani Websites Targeted

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

Hackers defaced the official website of the community of Shiloh, one day after the the anti-Israel hacker “ox0mar” downed the websites of  the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange and El Al.

The hackers left a message in Hebrew, writing: “Dear Managers. This is not a joke nor a dream. This is the true reality. From Kurdistan or Iraq. Blessings from all of the Kurdish hackers.” Shiloh is Jewish town in Samaria, north of Jerusalem.

Azerbaijan, an ally of Israel, also fell victim to anti-Israel hacking Monday when official government and judicial websites were hacked and with anti-Israel propaganda replacing original content.

“You are servants of the Jews,” said a message on Azerbaijan’s governing party’s homepage, and warned President Ilham Aliyev that he would meet the same demise as the former leaders of Egypt and Libya.

 

Vandals Graffiti Mosque, Torch 3 Cars Near Ariel

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Three cars were burned and the words “price tag Gal Arye Yosef” were spray-painted on a mosque wall late Tuesday night. Gal Yosef is an outpost located near Shiloh that has been repeatedly dismantled by the IDF, and was most recently demolished on Monday. During the evacuation and demolition that took place last December, a Torah scroll in one of the homes was desecrated.

Defense Minister Ehud Barak reacted strongly, calling the perpetrators “criminals,” and blaming them for trying to “harm the delicate fabric of life between Israelis and Palestinians in the West Bank.”

David Haivri, director of the Shomron Liaison Office, stressed that the “Shomron Regional Council condemns any violence or vandalism against the IDF and Muslim holy places,” and noted that of the suspects that have been charged for such acts in the past, none resided in the Shomron region.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/vandals-graffiti-mosque-torch-3-cars-near-ariel/2012/01/11/

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