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February 28, 2015 / 9 Adar , 5775
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These ‘Cynical Elections,’ and the Moses-Amalek Face-Off
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Savyoney Arnona from Africa Israel Residences

Situated in the south of Jerusalem, the project benefits from one of the city’s most prestigious and desirable locales, nestled in a particularly attractive area between the Talpiot neighborhood and the green groves of Kibbutz Ramat Rachel.



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Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

Rebbetzin Jungreis’s Viewpoint

14 posts
Judaism
Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis
 

Posted on: July 31st, 2013

JudaismRebbetzin's Viewpoint

Let us understand once and for all that G-d is not a puppeteer and we are not puppets.

Staum-072613
 

Posted on: July 26th, 2013

JudaismParsha

Rabbi Yitzchak Zilber zt’l was a legendary leader of Russian Jewry for over three decades. He remained resolutely firm in his faith and practiced Torah and mitzvos throughout his arduous years behind the Iron Curtain, even in the brutality of a Russian Labor Camp. His autobiography, To Remain a Jew[1] is his incredible account of how he remained faithful to G-d even under the most trying circumstances. The following is just one anecdote recorded in the book:

Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom
 

Posted on: July 26th, 2013

JudaismWeekly Luach

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Daf-Yomi-logo
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismHalacha & Hashkafa

The Case Of The Stumbling Block (Pesachim 37b-38a)

QuestionsandAnswers-logo
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: The famous Iggeret of Rav Sherira Gaon references Yerushalmi Kilaim 9:3 and Kesubos 12:3 and states that Rabbi Judah the Prince descended from Hillel who, in turn, descended from the tribe of Binyamin – not Yehudah. The Iggeret also discusses how the Mishnah was written and how Rabbi Judah worked on it. Had Menachem read this Iggeret by Rav Sherira Gaon – who, incidentally, was a direct descendant of King David – I don’t think he would have asked his question. Yehuda T. (Via E-Mail)

3
The Prince of Wales with Lord Sacks, Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth.
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismColumnsRabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

One of the more unusual aspects of being a chief rabbi is that one comes to know people one otherwise might not.

Business-Halacha-logo
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismHalacha & Hashkafa

Rabbi Dayan walked into class and greeted his students. "Good morning! We're nearing the very end of Bava Kama," he announced. "Today we begin the final topic, b'ezras Hashem."

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismRebbetzin's Viewpoint

It is wise not to react to everything you see or hear.

Taste-of-Lomdus-logo
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismParsha

In this week’s parshah we derive the mitzvah of birchas hamazon from the pasuk of “v’achalta v’savata u’veirachta” (Devarim 8:10). This mitzvah is to recite three berachos mi’de’oraisa and one mi’de’rabbanan after one eats bread made from the five grains (wheat, spelt, oats, rye, and barley).

Lessons-logo
 

Posted on: July 25th, 2013

JudaismColumnsLessons In Emunah

It took a few months, but I finally summoned up what little koach I had to go to the Lubavitcher Rebbe, zt”l, for “Sunday Dollars.” I wanted to take my new baby to the Rebbe. Although he was about three months old at the time, I had not been strong enough until now to attempt a trip to 770 Eastern Parkway.

Alan Veingrad
 

Posted on: July 19th, 2013

InDepthInterviews and Profiles

In 1992 the Dallas Cowboys won Super Bowl XXVII. Among the members of the team was a young Jewish man named Alan Veingrad. Alan, now Shlomo, became frum several years later and found a much more significant calling: as an in-demand speaker he captivates Jewish and non-Jewish audiences around the world with lessons from his football days and from his teshuva journey.

Niehaus-071913
 

Posted on: July 18th, 2013

JudaismParsha

Ah, Shabbos Nachamu! Finally the three weeks of mourning have finished, and the seven-week period of comforting, of nechama, has begun. We breathe a sigh of relief and life goes back to normal. But wait a minute – it doesn’t seem like anything has changed!

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks
 

Posted on: July 18th, 2013

JudaismColumnsRabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

The biblical covenant has the same literary structure as ancient near eastern political treaties.

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Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis
 

Posted on: July 18th, 2013

JudaismRebbetzin's Viewpoint

Examine your life and recite Psalm 100 – the Psalm of Thanksgiving. Yes, you have many things to be grateful for and rejoice in.

1
 

Posted on: July 18th, 2013

JudaismHalacha & Hashkafa

We popularly refer to the eight-day period, from the fifteenth through the twenty second of Nissan, as the festival of Pesach. The Torah, however, calls this period Chag HaMatzot, during which time we eat matzot and abstain from eating chametz.

Taste-of-Lomdus-logo
 

Posted on: July 18th, 2013

JudaismParsha

In this week’s parshah and in Parshas Re’eh the Torah commands us not to add to the mitzvos or lessen them (bal tosif and bal tigra). For example, the Gemara in Sanhedrin 88b says that one may not have five parshios in his tefillin or five different species together with his lulav. The Ramban in Parshas Re’eh says that the pasuk in this week’s parshah is the main prohibition and the pasuk in Re’eh is referring to the korbanos.

Daf-Yomi-logo
 

Posted on: July 17th, 2013

JudaismHalacha & Hashkafa

Chametz On Shabbos Erev Pesach (Pesachim 32a)

1
QuestionsandAnswers-logo
 

Posted on: July 17th, 2013

JudaismAsk the Rabbi

Question: I have numerous questions about Kiddush Levanah. First, why is this prayer called Kiddush Levanah? Shouldn’t it be called Chiddush Levanah considering that the prayer concerns the renewal – not the sanctification – of the moon? Second, why do we greet each other with the words Shalom Aleichem at Kiddush Levanah and why do we repeat the greeting three times? Is it because we have not seen a new moon for a whole month? Third, why does Kiddush Levanah – and other prayers – contain verses (aside from the Shalom Aleichem greeting) that we are supposed to say three times? Please elaborate on this mitzvah. Ira Warshansky (Via E-Mail)

Business-Halacha-logo
 

Posted on: July 17th, 2013

JudaismHalacha & Hashkafa

Tiferes Torah Synagogue needed a new Sefer Torah and embarked on a Sefer Torah campaign among its members.

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