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November 27, 2014 / 5 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘board’

New Hampshire’s Jew Pond Officially Renamed

Monday, September 10th, 2012

A federal board changed the name of a pond in a small New Hampshire town from Jew Pond to Carleton Pond.

The name change by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names comes six months after Mont Vernon residents voted for a name change. The new name honors one of the town’s founding families.

Richard Masters, the town’s health officer, had called for the change two years ago, saying the name was disrespectful and offensive. Masters had learned of the official name of the recreational water hole while investigating an algae bloom on the pond.

The body of water had been known as Jew Pond since the 1920s, though there are no signs to that effect. The name, however, does appear on maps.

Dug near a hotel and golf complex, the manmade pond originally was called Spring Pond, but reportedly became known as Jew Pond after two Jewish businessmen bought the hotel and its grounds. They intended to make the pond bigger and call it Lake Serene, according to The Associated Press.

The pond is now located in Carleton Park on land donated by George Carleton.

New Hampshire’s Jew Pond Officially Renamed

Monday, September 10th, 2012

A federal board changed the name of a pond in a small New Hampshire town from Jew Pond to Carleton Pond.

The name change by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names comes six months after Mont Vernon residents voted for a name change. The new name honors one of the town’s founding families.

Richard Masters, the town’s health officer, had called for the change two years ago, saying the name was disrespectful and offensive. Masters had learned of the official name of the recreational water hole while investigating an algae bloom on the pond.

The body of water had been known as Jew Pond since the 1920s, though there are no signs to that effect. The name, however, does appear on maps.

Dug near a hotel and golf complex, the manmade pond originally was called Spring Pond, but reportedly became known as Jew Pond after two Jewish businessmen bought the hotel and its grounds. They intended to make the pond bigger and call it Lake Serene, according to The Associated Press.

The pond is now located in Carleton Park on land donated by George Carleton.

Ma’ariv Switches to Internet-Only on Weekdays

Monday, September 3rd, 2012

The Israeli daily Ma’ariv, which has been in existence since 1948, will cease its daily print edition, and will instead provide only internet news during the week.

The weekend Ma’ariv edition will be sold every Friday and on holidays, according to the newspaper’s editor. No exact date for the changes has been announced.

The board of Discount Investment Corporation, owned by Nochi Danker, who also owns Maariv, on Sunday agreed to put more than $3 million into the daily newspaper.

The board of Ma’ariv also ordered the liquidation of the newspaper’s at the printing house in Bat Yam, in a sale expected to take in some $50 million.

Learning As I Teach

Friday, August 31st, 2012

This was my first teaching job. I was standing in front of a classroom of eighteen delightful third graders. I had tutored and taught small groups of children over the years but this was my very own class. I could barely believe it. I was all of nineteen years old and I was so nervous. My stomach hurt and I hardly slept the night before the start of the school year. Eighteen pairs of sweet, adorable eyes followed my every move, every day.

I had spent the past two weeks decorating my classroom. Creating a bulletin board that would be exciting and interesting, yet clear and informative. It was bright and colorful but defined and organized. I wanted my students to understand my routines, yet be curious to find out more of what I had in store for them.

I prepared and worked hard on my lessons. I taught with enthusiasm and energy. I brought in visual aids and props galore. I acted out stories in an intense and dramatic way that surprised even me. I captured my students’ attention and piqued their interest in learning. I honed in on their skills and challenged them in new ways. I built their confidence and motivated them to want to learn more.

But like every new teacher, no matter how much I prepared I still had loads to learn. And my students taught me. I remember the first time I announced, “Everyone, please hand in your homework from yesterday,” and eighteen worksheet papers went flying in my direction. Many of them falling slowly to the floor and bedlam ensued. The next day, I instituted the “Homework Collection” system which worked wonders.

Well, there I was, deep into a Chumash lesson, sing-songing the pesukim and translating word for word, adding my creative hand motions that connected to each word and hanging up sentence strips on the bulletin board; when I learned yet another valuable lesson from my students.

Tami G. was a tall third grader. She was only nine years old but she reached my shoulders and maybe a bit higher. She was almost double the height of some of the children in my class. Tami was the type of girl who had an easygoing smile and was happy to go along with whatever the class was doing. Her notebooks, loose-leaf binder, papers, and pencil case were always shoved into her desk and something, inevitably, was always poking out in a haphazard way. She was still able to find whatever she needed and as long as she was okay with it, I didn’t mind either. Naturally, as the tallest in the class, Tami sat in the back of the room. She had an extra tall chair and desk. Her legs were almost always restlessly moving trying to find a comfortable spot. She was involved in the class lessons and always had great comments to share.

As I said, there I was, in the midst of my captivating and well cultivated lesson when Tami moved her feet a bit in the wrong direction bumping her desk. Her whole desk knocked over and fell forward toward her. She caught the desk before it crashed to the floor but everything inside of it came tumbling out. Everything. And of course, her pencil case wasn’t zipped – so there was a nice mess on the floor and whole lot of noise. All eyes turned toward Tami. The room was silent.

There went my lesson.

Tami with her half-smile, hand raised, called out, “Clean Up in Aisle 4!”

And I burst out laughing.

Tami’s smile stretched further and happily joined mine, laughing. My class was pleasantly surprised to see their teacher laughing and started giggling, then laughing along with me.

That’s when I learned my favorite lesson of all. I realized that it is wonderful to find little moments of good, healthy, wholesome laughter. It puts a whole different spin in the classroom atmosphere and sprinkles the air with such a special happiness. It is a marvelous way to show that we enjoy learning and life.

Over the past number of years teaching, I learned so many lessons from my students but this one I treasure most. And I have found incredible, exciting opportunities to smile and laugh together with my students and it brightens the whole classroom.

Clint Doing the RNC (with Video)

Friday, August 31st, 2012

Lynne Lechter is on the board of the Republican Jewish Coalition’s National Women’s Committee.  She is at the Republican National Convention as a guest of the RJC.  She is one of our good friend Lori Lowenthal Marcus’s sources on what Jewish Republicans have been up to in muggy Tampa. She’s been telling Lori this and that, until, last night, it all came to a giant crescendo with the appearance of the Man. Clint Eastwood.

Lynne wrote:

“It was unexpected. He was hard to hear from where we were, but he did get a lot of applause and chants – make my day. He got a lot of laughs from the empty chair routine and saying Mutt cant do that to himself as if Obama said it, got huge laughter. I think his early comment was about what I am doing here aren’t all Hollywood types liberal. And then saying there are a lot of conservatives in Hollywood. Being conservative they are more quiet about it.”

The note “Sent from my iPhone” explains some of the condensed nature of the text, but we get the gist of it. And we added the video, so you’ll see what she’s talking about. Clint is the man. Which is why they should have made the theme of “For a Fistful of Dollars” the campaign song.

I would totally vote Republican if Clint was running. Are you kidding me? But he’d have to drop the cigar stub. Federal buildings are a no-smoking zone.

Oh, yes, totally forgot – Some guy named Mitt Romney did the acceptance speech thing last night, too. Apparently he’s running for this or that federal post. I think Clint even recommended him…

Tel Aviv Cop Shoots and Kills Palestinian Car Thief

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

A 33 year old resident of the Disputed Territories staying illegally in Israel was shot and killed Wednesday night in northern Tel Aviv by an off-duty police officer.

From initial reports it appears that the man was engaging in auto theft at the time and threatened the police officer with a knife prior to being shot. He was shot in the neck, and ran a few yards before dropping dead. The exact circumstances of the incident are currently being investigated by Machash—Dept of Policemen Investigation, the police internal affairs unit of the Justice Ministry.

The incident began at about 1:30 AM, when the MDA (Israel’s EMT) received a call about a 33 year old man who had been shot during a police chase in a parking lot on Yaakov Mark Street in the Hadar Yosef neighborhood of Tel Aviv. The MDA crew tried to revive the man, but in the end, he was declared dead.

The officer that shot him, a local resident assigned to the northern Tel Aviv district, testified that he noticed suspicious activity in the parking lot adjacent to his house and began to chase after two suspects who were fleeing the scene. A struggle ensued between the police officer and one of the suspects, during which he shot the suspect. According to the officer, the second suspect got away.

A large number of police units arrived at the scene, among them Tel Aviv police chief Aharon Aksel, and the commander of the Yarkon region, Brigadier General Yoram Ochayon. A portable criminal identification laboratory was also brought to the scene.

“We are referring to a police officer that was passing by and noticed two suspects breaking into and stealing cars,” explained Ochayon. “A chase ensued involving a struggle during which the suspect was shot. The case has been given over to Internal Affairs. I can only comment that the police officer is considered an excellent officer who carried out his duty as required. Unfortunately, the incident culminated with the suspect’s death. This was an incident where the suspects broke into a house, took the keys and were in the process of stealing the car. I support all my officers, but we will wait for the results of the investigation.”

A man living close to the scene related, “We heard screams and went outside. I took my dogs and heard someone scream ‘God.’ Then I heard a single shot. When I got close, I heard the police officer shout, ‘I shot him.’ The police officer was holding the suspect with one hand and calling MDA with his other hand.”

Last month, a parole board freed Shachar Mizrahi, a police officer sentenced to 30 months in prison after being found guilty of killing Mahmoud Ganaim, a car thief. Mizrahi was freed a month earlier than the date set by the Prison Authority parole board because of an unexpected overload in the prison system.

Incitement Underscores Palestinian Unwillingness To Make Peace

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

When Barack Obama entered the White House, he promised to make Israeli/Palestinian peacemaking his priority from “day one.” And, indeed, in his own way he did. He pressured Israel into freezing Jewish construction in the West Bank for ten months in a bid to entice the Palestinians to negotiate.

Yet Mahmoud Abbas’s Palestinian Authority refused negotiations except for a few days near the end of the 10-month period and has not negotiated substantively since.

On its face, this is puzzling. If Abbas and the PA were eager for statehood alongside Israel – as they claim in their official speeches in international forums – nothing would be easier than to agree to negotiations that would lead in that direction, under an American president who has been strongly pushing for this.

But they don’t.

The reason? Lacking a state is less intolerable for the Palestinian movement than accepting the right of Jews to have a state of their own. And indeed, Palestinians turned down statehood on the four occasions detailed plans were proposed to create one – 1937, 1947, 2000 and 2008.

The common denominator to these rejections was that these plans all encompassed a Jewish state living alongside it. The leitmotif of Palestinian politics has been the rejection of precisely this proposition.

There are mountains of evidence to establish this proposition, but let’s confine ourselves to merely a recent six-week period.

Demonization of Jews: The PA TV children’s program “The Best Home” that aired on April 22 and again on May 8 featured a child reciting a poem which included the following words: “Our enemy, Zion, is Satan with a tail.”

Terrorists glorified: On April 16, the PA publicly mourned the anniversary of the death of PLO arch-terrorist Khalil Al-Wazir (Abu Jihad). The PA held six sporting events in his honor and broadcast TV programs celebrating him and his career of terror attacks. WAFA, the official PA news agency, glorified his killing of Israelis and enumerated in detail and with approbation his attacks on Israeli civilian targets in an article that also appeared in the official PA daily Al-Hayat Al-Jadida.

An old Wazir speech was exhumed from the archives and rebroadcast, a section of which included the following, “On one street, for example, we will hold 500 people [hostage]…at any moment, he can blow up everyone; blow up their building, or the whole thing, no matter how many people are there.… We want to turn the Tel Aviv day black. We want to turn the Tel Aviv day into destruction, Allah willing.”

On May 31, ninety-one Palestinian terrorists, including many suicide bombers whose corpses were recently handed over by Israel to the PA as a goodwill gesture, were given a military funeral for heroes by the PA. Mahmoud Abbas, Prime Minister Salam Fayyad and other PA dignitaries were in attendance. All the returned terrorists were categorized as shahids (martyrs), thus conferring on them the status of national and religious heroes.

The secretary general of Abbas’s office, Tayeb Abd Al-Rahim, declared, “We ask Allah to gather you in the uppermost heaven, along with the prophets, the righteous,” while the Mufti of the PA, Muhammad Hussein, said, “By Allah’s will, we still have elite groups of martyrs like these among us.… The souls of the noble martyrs envelop us, and their souls tell us to follow in their path.”

Compromise repudiated: The day before Israel Independence Day, PA TV broadcast a political statement that included the following: ” Let all religions know that I do not make truces, let every person know that I do not compromise.… Let Jaffa [an Israeli city] know that I will return to it.” Clearly, such is the political program and message the PA wishes to transmit to its people.

Muslim supremacism: On May 11, PA TV featured a children’s program in which a young Palestinian girl was asked to recite a poem that includes insults to Christians and Jews (“They are remnants of the [Christian] crusaders and Khaibar [Jews]“; are “inferior and smaller, more cowardly and despised” and the “enemies of destiny”).

These salient themes in the Palestinian public square inform us that Palestinian incitement is a symptom of rejection of Jewish sovereignty, not the absence of peace. In these circumstances, peacemaking is not so much premature as it is foredoomed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/incitement-underscores-palestinian-unwillingness-to-make-peace/2012/08/22/

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