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August 24, 2016 / 20 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘days’

Jews! Three Days to Get Out!

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

An article appeared recently in the newspaper, Israel HaYom, describing how a pro-Palestinian BDS group targeted Jewish students on a college campus in America, by posting signs in their dormitories telling Jews to vacate the premises, saying that was how the Israeli army treated the Palestinians. These signs have been taped to the door of dormitory rooms of Jewish students, giving the occupants three days to vacate, and warning that their belongings will be thrown into the street if they don’t abide by the order. This is the work of a BDS group called SJP – “Students for Palestinian Justice”. The signs appeared on many campuses across the United States, including the University of Florida and Berkley College.

Outrageous? Terrible? Scandalous? Not at all. I for one am glad. At least someone in the United States is telling young Jews that they don’t belong in America. Their rabbis don’t tell them. Their parents don’t tell them. The Hillel organization doesn’t tell them. The leaders of Jewish Federations and MAJOR JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS don’t tell them. At least the Jew haters are letting them know. Kol Hakod!

I’m glad. Though I am not convinced the Jews will get the message. A Jewish student from Berkley had this to say: “The connection which the SJP makes between our being Jews and their protest over the Palestinian plight in Israel smacks of anti-Semetism. A distinction must be made between their criticism of the situation in Israel and my being Jewish. I have nothing to do with what goes on in Israel. There is no justice in targeting me on my college campus just because I am Jewish.”

Notice what he says: “I have nothing to do with what goes on in Israel.” Notice how he cuts himself off from Israel. In his eyes, he is an American, not an Israeli. This in itself is the crisis of American Jewry and the reason for the ever-increasing assimilation. In truth, he is the true refugee from

“Palestine” whom the Romans expelled from the one and only Jewish Homeland – Israel. Because of our long exile and wanderings in foreign lands, this Jewish college student in America has forgotten his true identity. His parents, and rabbis, and teachers, and Jewish leaders, don’t tell him this truth because they too have forgotten. Rabbi Kook decries this tragedy of Jewish education in the Diaspora which fails to teach that the Land of Israel is an indivisible part of being Jewish, stating, “This orientation toward Eretz Yisrael is not worthy of bearing fruit. The concept of Judaism in the Diaspora will only find real strength through the depth of its connection to Eretz Yisrael.”

So if none of the Jewish educators and leaders are teaching young Jews the truth, it is a good thing that the boys from BDS are letting them know. More power to them!

Tzvi Fishman

A Soldier’s Mother: Days that Break Us

Monday, July 4th, 2016

I learned more than a decade ago, that there are days that fill you with strength, and there are days that break you. It’s over, you think to yourself. I just can’t go on. I can’t do this anymore. I can’t take it. Even the anger is not enough to sustain you; even the disgust at how blind others are is not enough to get you moving.

Ten more children have lost their father. When Sarah Techiya Litman’s father was murdered days before her wedding, she rallied not just for herself and her mother and siblings, but for all of Israel. Please come to my wedding, she begged Israel…and we did. So many thousands came that they had to shut off the wedding hall, letting in groups of people at a time as others left. The hall was filled, the outer grounds were filled. At one point, overwhelmed by the number of people waiting to share this evening with them, the bride and groom went outside to meet the people who had come to shower an orphan with love.

On Friday, Rabbi Miki Mark was murdered, his wife critically injured, and two of his children hurt in a terror attack not far from where they live. He leaves behind 10 children. Today, his children asked people to come to his funeral, to become better people, more loving. Rabbi Miki Mark was 48 years old…

Yesterday, Elie Wiesel died. He was 87. Both leave behind devastation and mourning. The death of Rabbi Mark leaves behind such sadness, a huge gap in a family, a community, a nation. The loss of Elie Wiesel leaves us with a void. Who will speak for the survivors now? How many are left? Are we ready to take on the challenge that Wiesel and others warned us was coming. Now it is on us to carry the torch of remembrance; to stand against a world that thrives on forgetting and dismissing the lessons of the past.

When someone who is well known passes away, people rush to post pictures of themselves with the person. It is a way of showing that they mourn, that they were touched by the person we have lost and they want to remind themselves and others of what once was.

This picture is now being posted on Facebook. It is a picture with three main people – all gone. Ariel Sharon, who led this nation to victory and was the essence of power. He was the lion that turned into the lamb; a man who built and then destroyed what he had helped to create. He was a man who forgot the future in the present that overwhelmed him.

Elie Wiesel kept the past with him and used it as a torch to light his way into the future. He led generations with a simple message. Tolerance, acceptance, peace, respect. Be human and be humane. Don’t surrender to tyranny. Fight for life – your own, and the right of others as well.

And finally, Rabbi Michoel Mark, who lived the life these other men fought for – to be a father of Jewish children, to live where he wanted to live in this land. It is both tragic and ironic that Rabbi Mark was murdered on Friday and Elie Wiesel died on Saturday. If Jewish law is to be followed, both will be buried today.

In Israel, we are in mourning for children who have lost a father, for a community that has lost a leader. For the pain of a wife, fighting for her life. Unconscious, sedated, and unaware that her life is forever changed. For their broken children who have called on Israel to come to the funeral and for the hundreds who have.

A picture, frozen in time, of three men who led the world in different ways. Elie Wiesel, as a survivor who chose to live in the United States, but loved Israel and came here often; of Ariel Sharon, who fought for this land as a lion of Judea, and then lost his way and surrendered to feed the monster that has been fighting and attacking our innocents for generations; of Rav Miki Mark, who chose the path of faith to fight for this land, to build a yeshiva where young men came and learned and dedicated themselves to the future.

Thursday, they murdered a 13 year old child in her bed; Friday, they murdered a father of ten. Today, we bury Rav Mark in tears and in pain.

Tomorrow, we will stand up, in mourning and in pain, in anger and faith, we will stand up and do what we have to do. We will be strong…tomorrow. We will not let terror win…tomorrow. Today, for a brief time, we will surrender to our pain, to the pain of a mother who suddenly buries her oldest child, to a summer lost before it began, to the agony of ten orphans who bury their father today and pray that their mother will not leave them as well.

Today, we cry from the depths of our souls.

Tomorrow, we will show them that we are not beaten, that we will not surrender. Ariel Sharon’s way was proven wrong. From the places he gave them, they shot a rocket that hit a kindergarten in Sderot that thankfully was empty. This is the legacy of Ariel Sharon. Elie Wiesel’s path is to remember what they have done to us in the past and do all we can to stop them. And so, generations after the Holocaust, we are still dedicated to remembering, to living with what the Nazis did so that it will never happen again.

And with broken hearts, we dedicate ourselves to the memory of Rav Miki Mark – the path is long but for an eternal people, we do not fear the future. We will stand. We will fight. We will not be defeated. From the earth that was given to us, we will build.

Today, we cry…but we live. Today, tomorrow, and into the future. Moments before this picture was taken, Elie Wiesel affixed a mezuzah to the doorpost of the yeshiva in Otneil. Today, it stands, tall and proud and filled with people. Tomorrow…we will rededicate ourselves to build.

May God bless the memory of Elie Wiesel and of Rav Michoel Mark and bless their memories and may God avenge the blood of all those who were murdered in the sanctity of God’s name.

 

Paula Stern

Jews! Three Days to Get Out!

Sunday, June 26th, 2016

An article appeared this week in the newspaper, Israel HaYom, describing how a pro-Palestinian BDS group targeted Jewish students on a college campus in America, by posting signs in their dormitories telling Jews to vacate the premises, saying that was how the Israeli army treated the Palestinians. These signs have been taped to the door of dormitory rooms of Jewish students, giving the occupants three days to vacate, and warning that their belongings will be thrown into the street if they don’t abide by the order. This is the work of a BDS group called SJP – “Students for Palestinian Justice”. The signs appeared on many campuses across the United States, including the University of Florida and Berkley College.

Outrageous? Terrible? Scandalous? Not at all. I for one am glad. At least someone in the United States is telling young Jews that they don’t belong in America. Their rabbis don’t tell them. Their parents don’t tell them. The Hillel organization doesn’t tell them. The leaders of Jewish Federations and MAJOR JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS don’t tell them. At least the Jew haters are letting them know. Kol Hakod!

I’m glad. Though I am not convinced the Jews will get the message. A Jewish student from Berkley had this to say: “The connection which the SJP makes between our being Jews and their protest over the Palestinian plight in Israel smacks of anti-Semetism. A distinction must be made between their criticism of the situation in Israel and my being Jewish. I have nothing to do with what goes on in Israel. There is no justice in targeting me on my college campus just because I am Jewish.”

Notice what he says: “I have nothing to do with what goes on in Israel.” Notice how he cuts himself off from Israel. In his eyes, he is an American, not an Israeli. This in itself is the crisis of American Jewry and the reason for the ever-increasing assimilation. In truth, he is the true refugee from “Palestine” whom the Romans expelled from the one and only Jewish Homeland – Israel.

Because of our long exile and wanderings in foreign lands, this Jewish college student in America has forgotten his true identity. His parents, and rabbis, and teachers, and Jewish leaders, don’t tell him this truth because they too have forgotten. Rabbi Kook decries this tragedy of Jewish education in the Diaspora which fails to teach that the Land of Israel is an indivisible part of being Jewish, stating, “This orientation toward Eretz Yisrael is not worthy of bearing fruit. The concept of Judaism in the Diaspora will only find real strength through the depth of its connection to Eretz Yisrael.”

So if none of the Jewish educators and leaders are teaching young Jews the truth, it is a good thing that the boys from BDS are letting them know. More power to them!

Tzvi Fishman

Shiloh Musings: A Six Days War IDF Soldier Tells his Story

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Yesterday, in honor of Yom Yerushalayim, Jerusalem Day, the Shiloh Golden Agers/Senior Citizen program invited one of the neighbors to tell his story as a an IDF soldier during the 1967 Six Days War. Yes, if you’ve done the math, you know that age-wise he’s also a senior citizen, but a very busy one who doesn’t go the the activities. Most of the regulars are actually immigrants, and yesterday’s crowd was mostly English speakers, so the coordinator was happy when I surprised everyone and walked in, since I do lots of translating for them when I can. Of course, no surprise to you, my translations are full of “commentary.”

Our neighbor grew up on Tirat Tzvi, a religious kibbutz in the north of Israel.

Kibbutz Tirat Zvi was established on 21st of Tammuz, 5697, (June 30, 1937) as a “Tower and Stockade” settlement intended to mark the southern limit of Jewish settlement in the Bet Shean Valley.
Its first decade was marked by ceaseless struggle for existence against extremely difficult climatic conditions, swamps, malaria, tense day-to-day relations with local Arabs, and periodic organized enemy assault.
On the 6th of Adar 56, 5708, (February 16th, 1948), the one hundred primitively armed members of Tirat Zvi repelled a coordinated attack by over six hundred regular Iraqi troops.

He knew very well of the frequent Syrian shelling/sniping on the Jewish communities in his area coming from the Syrian held Golan Heights.

After a summary of the pre-Six Day War threats from the Egyptians and Syrians, and the cooperation of the United Nations, which readily removed its “peacekeeping forces” from the area to facilitate the Arab attack on Israel, we heard our neighbor’s story.

Instead of the usual call-up codes on the radio, which at that time was the entertainment and news source for Israelis, the IDF conducted an unprecedented “quiet call up” of reservists, going literally house to house to gather troops and take them to various bases for pre-war preparation. You should know that at that time, very few Israelis had telephones. Our neighbor was called on Shabbat, Friday night after dinner, and taken to his base. On the way they picked up other soldiers.

At the base they got their equipment and then went to another location where they began to train for an assault on the Golan Heights; each unit was assigned a different section.

All the while, Egypt, Syria and Iraq, well supplied by the USSR, continued with their threats of war, while Jordan remained silent. The Israeli Government kept hoping that Jordan would desist in joining the expected attack on Israel.

Early in the morning June 5, 1967, while unknown to my neighbor and his unit, Israel had launched an attack on the airfields of Syria, Egypt, Jordan and what could be reached in Iraq. What my neighbor and his fellow soldiers saw was something else. Suddenly two unmarked and unfamiliar planes flew over them. Within seconds Israeli planes reached them and began an air battle, yes, just like in the movies. One of the unmarked planes went down, and then the second one. Afterwards they found out that those were Iraqi planes and that was pretty much Iraq’s participation in the war to annihilate and destroy the State of Israel.

Contrary to facts on the ground, Egypt and Syria continued to broadcast optimistic and inaccurate news that they were marching on Tel Aviv and Haifa. They urged King Hussein of Jordan to join in or they would take over the areas his country had been occupying since 1949, the so called West Bank, Judea, Samaria and the Jordan Valley.

In the meantime, my neighbor’s unit had been told to change plans and went to the mountains looking over Shechem, Grizim and Eval. In the dark of the night, they literally found the Jordanian tank corps with their “pants down,” sound asleep in pajamas. When the Jordanians realized that the IDF had found them they fled, leaving their brand new American fully equipped tanks* for Israel to adopt.

When they got to Shechem, they sent an Arabic speaking IDF soldier to find the mayor and offer him a deal. The mayor agreed and entered the police compound, where the Jordanian legion was lodged, equipped with a white flag for surrender. After a short while, the Jordanian flag was lowered and white one raised.

At some point during all of this, suddenly my neighbor realized that he was part of the liberating of our Holy Land, the City of Shechem in which our Forefathers had lived and Joseph is buried. 

Then, to collect all of the weapons the Arabs had, they were told that they had 48 hours to bring weapons to the square without any repercussions, punishment. If any weapons were to be found in homes after that the punishment would be fierce. It worked, and the IDF got a lot of weapons from the arabs.

At one point, someone arrived with a newspaper heralding the liberation of Jerusalem the Kotel (western wall) and Har HaBayit (the Temple Mount.) Until then, my neighbor hadn’t a clue as to what was going on in the rest of the country.

His unit was finally sent to secure a section of the Golan Heights, but not the section they had been prepared for. And remember that the entire war took only Six Days.

The 1967 Six Day War was a miracle of Biblical proportions. Of this I have absolutely no doubt!!

*The Americans had refused to sell tanks to Israel, but obviously had no problems equipping the Jordanians. Also the USSR had been equipping the Egyptians and Syrians. Israel had inferior weaponry, since the best suppliers boycotted our country. 

Batya Medad

Six Days of Miracles – Setting the Record Straight [video]

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

“Who has ever heard of a full-scale regional war beginning on a Monday and ending by Saturday the same week?” asks the book “The Six-Day War Scroll,” published by the Mizrachi World Movement. It was a war where one tiny country of 2.5 million defended itself resoundingly against five neighboring countries with a combined military might of twice the number of soldiers, three times the number of tanks and four times the number of aircraft.

For three nail-biting weeks Israel was facing existential danger where many were imagining a return of the Holocaust, and then, one morning, the country and the nation experienced what could only be described as supernatural redemption, repelling the enemies and returning to ancient Biblical lands, including the holiest site, the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem.

“Six Days of Miracles” is an uplifting historic short highlighting the miraculous events of the Six Day War and emphasizing the Divine hand orchestrating these remarkable events from behind the scenes, based on the book. The Mizrachi World Movement has partnered with the author of the Hebrew edition Dr. Hagi Ben-Artzi and the Sifriyat Beit El publishing house in bringing this new Hebrew/English edition to the English-speaking world.

The film opens with a thought-provoking quote by Albert Einstein: “There are only two ways to live your life: one is as though nothing is a miracle, the other is as though everything is a miracle.” For most Jews, every passing year reveals even more intensely the divine miracles that began with the 1967 war, and are still with us.

JNi.Media

Tefillah: A Meeting With Hashem -Sefirah Days Are Chol HaMoed!

Friday, May 13th, 2016

Just two weeks have passed since we put away our Pesach dishes, but it seems like ages ago. But that is a great mistake! Did you know that Pesach doesn’t end until Shavuos? The Ramban tells us at the end of Emor (23:36) – this week’s sedra here in Eretz Yisroel, next week’s for those of you in chutz la’aretz) –

“These days of counting are similar to the days of Chol HaMoed that are in between the first and last day of Sukkos . . .”

Knowing this should make us jump for joy! All those weeks of preparation did not end after eight days –

they continue all the way until Shavuos!

But how are they similar to Chol HaMoed and what should we be focusing on during these special days?

 

49 Days of Self-Growth

Last time we saw that one of the primary purposes of the ten plagues was to awaken Klal Yisroel’s faith in Hashem so that they could act upon it. Indeed, they reached the level of being able to slaughter the Egyptian god without any fear, and leap into the raging Red Sea upon Hashem’s command. But that was not sufficient.

During Yetzias Mitzrayim they were raised to a level higher than what they were really worthy of. But once the light of that special day stopped shining, they would have fallen down to where they had been before if they had not taken immediate action. They began counting toward the day they would receive the Torah and 49 days of preparation commenced. The result was that they became truly worthy of receiving the Torah.

It is clear that intense self-perfection in many areas was necessary to merit the great revelation of Hashem’s glory on Har Sinai. But it is also possible to suggest that one of the things they focused on was living with the reality that Hashem was their Master. Thus, they internalized the clear lessons in emunah they had been shown, and returned to the level where they had been when they left Mitzrayim – through their own efforts.

This was not merely a historical event. The Ramchal in Derech Hashem tells us that during every important event in Klal Yisrael‘s history there was a spiritual light and it shines each year, on a smaller scale, when that time of the year comes around again. To gain the most from that light, we must prepare ourselves to tap into it.

 

Tapping The Light

The Maharal tells us that there is an integral difference between the meal offering sacrificed in the Bais HaMikdash on Pesach and the one that was brought on Shavuos. On Pesach we offered the omer from barley, which is animal food, but on Shavuos, the shtei halechem, the two loaves of bread, were from wheat, which is human food. This teaches us that in order for us to retain the level we reached on Pesach we must throw away our animalistic character traits. Only then can we hope to reach great spiritual heights.

One of the ways in which we act similar to an animal is in forgetting to think about the source from which all things come. Does an animal think about where its food comes from? It sees food in the feeding trough or grass in the meadow and doesn’t give two hoots who put it there. During the days of sefiras haomer we must rise to the level of being a human who understands the source of his food: the Master of the Universe.

One of the reasons Hashem wanted Klal Yisrael to offer this korban was for this reason. After all the effort the farmer invested in his field throughout the winter, there was a danger that when he reached the harvest he would pat himself on the back and think he accomplished it all. Thus, the Torah forbids him to harvest or consume his crop until after he has sacrificed the Korban Omer to Hashem. (Nowadays, when we unfortunately do not sacrifice the Omer, the new crop becomes permitted once the day when it used to be offered has passed.) This instills in him, and the rest of Klal Yisroel, the reality that Hashem is the One taking care of him.

Rabbi Eliezer M. Niehaus

Last Days Pesach

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Vol. LXVII No. 18                                                             5776
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
April 29, 2016 – 21 Nissan 5776
7:32 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 8:36 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 9:04 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Last Days Pesach (see below)
Weekly Haftara: Last Days Pesach (see below)
Daf Yomi: Kidushin 49
Mishna Yomit: Pe’ah 1:4-5
Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 196:20 – 197:2
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Ma’aseh Ha’Korbanos chap. 13-15
Earliest time for tallis and tefillin: 5:02 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunrise: 5:56 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:25 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 7:50 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sefiras HaOmer: 6

 

Friday morning, Shvi’i shel Pesach: Shacharis for Shalosh Regalim including ancillary tefillos, half hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We then remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first we call five aliyos and read in Parashas Beshalach (Shmos 13:17-15:26) from “Vayehi Beshalach” until “ki Ani Hashem rof’echa.” We place both scrolls on the Bimah and the Reader recites half kaddish. We then call the Maftir to read in the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:19-25) from “Vehikravtem” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara (II Samuel 22:1-51) from “Vayedaber Dovid” until “u’lzar’o ad olam. The chazzan then recites half- Kaddish. Musaf as the day before, the Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh with insertion of Vehikravtem, and before the conclusion of the chazzan’s repetition the Kohanim duchan. Following the repetition the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel, Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu and Shir shelYom. The mourners proceed with Kaddish recitals.

Mincha: as the day before, Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, half kaddish, the usual Festival Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh and the chazzan’s repetition followed by Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Kaddish Yasom, the Mourner’s Kaddish. As we have made an Eruv Tavshillin we commence with all Sabbath preparations. As we say Yizkor on Acharon Shel Pesach, it is customary to light Yizkor memorial candles for the departed at this time.

Friday eve, Acharon Shel Pesach: We must take care to light Shabbos candles not later than the times listed for each locality – as opposed to Yom Tov (7:32 p.m. E.D.T. N.Y.C.). Negligence in this regard can lead to an Issur de’Oraisa – a Biblical violation. The blessing is “…l’hadlik ner shel Shabbos v’shel Yom Tov.”

Kabbalas Shabbos: We do not say Lechu Neranena but greet Shabbos with an abridged liturgy. Nusach Ashkenaz begins with Mizmor Shir, Nusach Sefarad includes a longer text beginning at Mizmor LeDavid, followed by the first, second and last two stanzas of Lechah Dodi, then Mizmor Shir. Maariv of Festivals follows with inclusion of all Shabbos references – Sefira is counted after it is definitely dark. Kiddush of Shalosh Regalim with inclusion of Shabbos references. We wash for the Shabbos Seuda. Birkas Hamazon includes Retzeh and Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Shabbos: Shacharis of Festivals follows with inclusion of all Shabbos references, half Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We read Shir HaShirim, preferably from a Klaf (a scroll) – but we do not make a beracha over this reading – followed by Kaddish Yasom. We remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first Sefer we call seven Aliyos and we read in Parashas Re’eh (Devarim 14:22-16:17) from “Aser teaser” until “asher nasan lach.” For Maftir we read from the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:19-25) from “Vehikravtem” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara in Isaiah (10:32-12:6) from “Od hayom b’nov” until “k’dosh Yisrael.” We follow with Yekum Purkan, following which we place the Sifrei Torah on the Bimah, we send all the children (those who have parents) out of the shul and we begin to recite the Yizkor prayer. In most synagogues there is a custom to make a Yizkor appeal prior to the recitation of Yizkor due to the text of the prayer, which clearly states, “Ba’avur she’eten tzedaka – because I am donating to charity” (see Ta’amei HaMinhagim, Hilchos Pesach 587). We then say Av HaRachamim (due to the solemn mood we do not chant Kah Keili), Ashrei. We chant Yehalellu as we return the scrolls to the Aron HaKodesh.

Musaf for Festivals – Shalosh Regalim with mention of Shabbos. We include Shabbos in chazzan’s repetition of the Shemoneh Esreh as well, and we conclude with Kaddish Tiskabbel, Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu, Shir shel Yom and their respective Kaddish recitals. Kiddush of Shabbos and Yom Tov, we wash for Shabbos Seuda, Birkas HaMazon includes Retzeh and Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Mincha for Festival with mention of Shabbos: Ashrei, Uva LeTziyyon, chazzan recites half Kaddish – we remove the Torah from the Ark (Vayehi Binso’a) we call up three Aliyos and read Parashas Acharei Mos until “v’chipeir ba’ado u’v’ad beiso.” We return the Sefer to the Ark and the chazzan recites half- Kaddish, all say the Shemoneh Esreh of festivals with mention of Shabbos. Following the chazzan’s repetition (we do not say Tzidkas’cha) he concludes with Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and finally Kaddish Yasom – Mourner’s with Kaddish. (As it is Shabbos we wash for the Seuda Shelishis; in Birkas HaMazon we include Retzeh and Ya’aleh VeYavo.)

Maariv: Yom Tov [and Shabbos] concludes at 8:36 p.m., N.Y.C. E.D.T. [or for those who wait 72 minutes, 9:04 pm., N.Y.C. E.D.T.], the usual weekday Maariv Tefilla, with the inclusion of Ata Chonantanu,Vi’Yehi Noam v’Ata Kadosh, followed by Sefiras HaOmer. [After Alenu, or for some before, we say V’yiten Lecha.] We make Havdala at home. (Some are accustomed to recite Havdala in shul as well.)

Sunday morning: Isru Chag – Shacharis as usual, but we do not say Tachanun until the end of Nissan.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. –Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/weekly-luach/last-days-pesach-3/2016/04/27/

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