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June 1, 2016 / 24 Iyar, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘days’

Last Days Pesach

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Vol. LXVII No. 18                                                             5776
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
April 29, 2016 – 21 Nissan 5776
7:32 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 8:36 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 9:04 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Last Days Pesach (see below)
Weekly Haftara: Last Days Pesach (see below)
Daf Yomi: Kidushin 49
Mishna Yomit: Pe’ah 1:4-5
Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 196:20 – 197:2
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Ma’aseh Ha’Korbanos chap. 13-15
Earliest time for tallis and tefillin: 5:02 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunrise: 5:56 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:25 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 7:50 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sefiras HaOmer: 6

 

Friday morning, Shvi’i shel Pesach: Shacharis for Shalosh Regalim including ancillary tefillos, half hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We then remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first we call five aliyos and read in Parashas Beshalach (Shmos 13:17-15:26) from “Vayehi Beshalach” until “ki Ani Hashem rof’echa.” We place both scrolls on the Bimah and the Reader recites half kaddish. We then call the Maftir to read in the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:19-25) from “Vehikravtem” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara (II Samuel 22:1-51) from “Vayedaber Dovid” until “u’lzar’o ad olam. The chazzan then recites half- Kaddish. Musaf as the day before, the Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh with insertion of Vehikravtem, and before the conclusion of the chazzan’s repetition the Kohanim duchan. Following the repetition the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel, Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu and Shir shelYom. The mourners proceed with Kaddish recitals.

Mincha: as the day before, Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, half kaddish, the usual Festival Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh and the chazzan’s repetition followed by Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Kaddish Yasom, the Mourner’s Kaddish. As we have made an Eruv Tavshillin we commence with all Sabbath preparations. As we say Yizkor on Acharon Shel Pesach, it is customary to light Yizkor memorial candles for the departed at this time.

Friday eve, Acharon Shel Pesach: We must take care to light Shabbos candles not later than the times listed for each locality – as opposed to Yom Tov (7:32 p.m. E.D.T. N.Y.C.). Negligence in this regard can lead to an Issur de’Oraisa – a Biblical violation. The blessing is “…l’hadlik ner shel Shabbos v’shel Yom Tov.”

Kabbalas Shabbos: We do not say Lechu Neranena but greet Shabbos with an abridged liturgy. Nusach Ashkenaz begins with Mizmor Shir, Nusach Sefarad includes a longer text beginning at Mizmor LeDavid, followed by the first, second and last two stanzas of Lechah Dodi, then Mizmor Shir. Maariv of Festivals follows with inclusion of all Shabbos references – Sefira is counted after it is definitely dark. Kiddush of Shalosh Regalim with inclusion of Shabbos references. We wash for the Shabbos Seuda. Birkas Hamazon includes Retzeh and Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Shabbos: Shacharis of Festivals follows with inclusion of all Shabbos references, half Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We read Shir HaShirim, preferably from a Klaf (a scroll) – but we do not make a beracha over this reading – followed by Kaddish Yasom. We remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first Sefer we call seven Aliyos and we read in Parashas Re’eh (Devarim 14:22-16:17) from “Aser teaser” until “asher nasan lach.” For Maftir we read from the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:19-25) from “Vehikravtem” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara in Isaiah (10:32-12:6) from “Od hayom b’nov” until “k’dosh Yisrael.” We follow with Yekum Purkan, following which we place the Sifrei Torah on the Bimah, we send all the children (those who have parents) out of the shul and we begin to recite the Yizkor prayer. In most synagogues there is a custom to make a Yizkor appeal prior to the recitation of Yizkor due to the text of the prayer, which clearly states, “Ba’avur she’eten tzedaka – because I am donating to charity” (see Ta’amei HaMinhagim, Hilchos Pesach 587). We then say Av HaRachamim (due to the solemn mood we do not chant Kah Keili), Ashrei. We chant Yehalellu as we return the scrolls to the Aron HaKodesh.

Musaf for Festivals – Shalosh Regalim with mention of Shabbos. We include Shabbos in chazzan’s repetition of the Shemoneh Esreh as well, and we conclude with Kaddish Tiskabbel, Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu, Shir shel Yom and their respective Kaddish recitals. Kiddush of Shabbos and Yom Tov, we wash for Shabbos Seuda, Birkas HaMazon includes Retzeh and Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Mincha for Festival with mention of Shabbos: Ashrei, Uva LeTziyyon, chazzan recites half Kaddish – we remove the Torah from the Ark (Vayehi Binso’a) we call up three Aliyos and read Parashas Acharei Mos until “v’chipeir ba’ado u’v’ad beiso.” We return the Sefer to the Ark and the chazzan recites half- Kaddish, all say the Shemoneh Esreh of festivals with mention of Shabbos. Following the chazzan’s repetition (we do not say Tzidkas’cha) he concludes with Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and finally Kaddish Yasom – Mourner’s with Kaddish. (As it is Shabbos we wash for the Seuda Shelishis; in Birkas HaMazon we include Retzeh and Ya’aleh VeYavo.)

Maariv: Yom Tov [and Shabbos] concludes at 8:36 p.m., N.Y.C. E.D.T. [or for those who wait 72 minutes, 9:04 pm., N.Y.C. E.D.T.], the usual weekday Maariv Tefilla, with the inclusion of Ata Chonantanu,Vi’Yehi Noam v’Ata Kadosh, followed by Sefiras HaOmer. [After Alenu, or for some before, we say V’yiten Lecha.] We make Havdala at home. (Some are accustomed to recite Havdala in shul as well.)

Sunday morning: Isru Chag – Shacharis as usual, but we do not say Tachanun until the end of Nissan.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. –Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Facebook Bans Aussie User 3 Days for Slamming Anti-Semitism

Sunday, April 17th, 2016

An Australian gym named “IDF Training” was temporarily banned from Facebook after the owner “shared” an anti-Semitic post that had been sent to him, and added the hashtag #saynotoracism.

The anti-Semitic post called gym owner Avi Yemini a “pig f**ker” and added “Australia is against israel (sic).”

Apparently someone with whom the post was “shared” did not appreciate the comment, but instead of aiming his disgust at the anti-Semitic goon who wrote it, the anonymous user reported Yemini for posting offensive material.

Facebook suspended Yemini’s account for three days for violation of terms of service.

“I’ve spoken to Facebook explaining that it was in fact his vile message that was in breach of their terms, and that I couldn’t believe that not only are they siding with the racist user, they are penalizing an advocate for understanding and tolerance,” he said.

Yemini is an IDF veteran who served in the Golani Brigade. He now encourages his Melbourne gym members to join the IDF as he teaches “krav maga” – the hand-to-hand combat skills he learned as a recruit. “This is AUTHENTIC Krav Maga,” he writes on his Facebook page. “We train for the worst possible situations, safely and realistically. Don’t be fooled by fakes.”

Hana Levi Julian

Testing And Prophecy

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

How did our ancestors distinguish a true prophet from a false one?

Unlike kings or priests, prophets did not derive authority from formal office. Their authority lay in their personality, their ability to give voice to the word of God, their self-evident inspiration. But precisely because a prophet has privileged access to the word others cannot hear, the visions others cannot see, the real possibility existed of false prophets – like those of Baal in the days of King Ahab.

What was there to prevent a fraudulent, or even a sincere but mistaken, figure, able to perform signs and wonders and move the people by the power of his words, from taking the nation in a wrong direction, misleading others and perhaps even himself?

Moses addresses this concern in our sedra:

“You may say to yourselves, ‘How can we know when a message has not been spoken by the Lord?’ If what a prophet proclaims in the name of the Lord does not take place or come true, that is a message the Lord has not spoken. That prophet has spoken presumptuously. Do not be afraid of him.”

On the face of it, the test is simple: if what the prophet predicts comes to pass, he is a true prophet; if not, not. Clearly, though, it was not that simple.

The classic case is the Book of Jonah. Jonah is commanded by God to warn the people of Nineveh that their wickedness is about to bring disaster on them. Jonah attempts to flee, but fails – the famous story of the sea, the storm, and the “great fish.” Eventually he goes to Nineveh and utters the words God has commanded him to say – “Forty more days and Nineveh will be destroyed” – the people repent and the city is spared. Jonah, however, is deeply dissatisfied:

But Jonah was greatly displeased and became angry. He prayed to the Lord, “O Lord, is this not what I said when I was still at home? That is why I was so quick to flee to Tarshish. I knew that you are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abounding in love, a God who relents from sending calamity. Now, O Lord, take away my life, for it is better for me to die than to live” (Jonah 4:1-3).

Jonah’s complaint can be understood in two ways. First, he was distressed that God had forgiven the people. They were, after all, wicked. They deserved to be punished. Why then did a mere change of heart release them from the punishment that was their due?

Second, he had been made to look a fool. He had told them that in 40 days the city would be destroyed. It was not. God’s mercy made nonsense of his prediction.

Jonah is wrong to be displeased: that much is clear. God says, in the rhetorical question with which the book concludes: “Should I not be concerned about that great city?” Should I not be merciful? Should I not forgive?

But what then becomes of the criterion Moses lays down for distinguishing between a true and false prophet: “If what a prophet proclaims in the name of the Lord does not take place or come true, that is a message the Lord has not spoken”? Jonah had proclaimed that the city would be destroyed in 40 days. It wasn’t; yet the proclamation was true. He really did speak the word of God. How can this be so?

The answer is given in the book of Jeremiah. Jeremiah had been prophesying national disaster. The people had drifted from their religious vocation, and the result would be defeat and exile. It was a difficult and demoralizing message for people to hear. A false prophet arose, Hananiah son of Azzur, preaching the opposite. Babylon, Israel’s enemy, would soon be defeated. Within two years the crisis would be over. Jeremiah knew that it was not so, and that Hananiah was telling the people what they wanted to hear, not what they needed to hear. He addressed the assembled people:

He said, “Amen! May the Lord do so! May the Lord fulfill the words you have prophesied by bringing the articles of the Lord’s house and all the exiles back to this place from Babylon. Nevertheless, listen to what I have to say in your hearing and in the hearing of all the people: From early times the prophets who preceded you and me have prophesied war, disaster, and plague against many countries and great kingdoms. But the prophet who prophesies peace will be recognized as one truly sent by the Lord only if his prediction comes true.”

Jeremiah makes a fundamental distinction between good news and bad. It is easy to prophesy disaster. If the prophecy comes true, then you have spoken the truth. If it does not, then you can say: God relented and forgave. A negative prophecy cannot be refuted – but a positive one can. If the good foreseen comes to pass, then the prophecy is true. If it does not, then you cannot say, “God changed His mind” because God does not retract from a promise He has made of good, or peace, or return.

It is therefore only when the prophet offers a positive vision that he can be tested. That is why Jonah was wrong to believe he had failed when his negative prophecy – the destruction of Nineveh – failed to come true. This is how Maimonides puts it:

“As to calamities predicted by a prophet, if, for example, he foretells the death of a certain individual or declares that in particular year there will be famine or war and so forth, the non-fulfillment of his forecast does not disprove his prophetic character. We are not to say, ‘See, he spoke and his prediction has not come to pass.’ For God is long-suffering and abounding in kindness and repents of evil. It may also be that those who were threatened repented and were therefore forgiven, as happened to the men of Nineveh. Possibly too, the execution of the sentence is only deferred, as in the case of Hezekiah.

“But if the prophet, in the name of God, assures good fortune, declaring that a particular event would come to pass, and the benefit promised has not been realized, he is unquestionably a false prophet, for no blessing decreed by the Almighty, even if promised conditionally, is ever revoked … Hence we learn that only when he predicts good fortune can the prophet be tested (Yesodei ha-Torah 10:4).

Fundamental conclusions follow from this. A prophet is not an oracle: a prophecy is not a prediction. Precisely because Judaism believes in free will, the human future can never be unfailingly predicted. People are capable of change. God forgives. As we say in our prayers on the High Holy Days: “Prayer, penitence, and charity avert the evil decree.”

There is no decree that cannot be revoked. A prophet does not foretell. He warns. A prophet does not speak to predict future catastrophe but rather to avert it. If a prediction comes true it has succeeded. If a prophecy comes true it has failed.

The second consequence is no less far-reaching. The real test of prophecy is not bad news but good. Calamity, catastrophe, disaster prove nothing. Anyone can foretell these things without risking his reputation or authority. It is only by the realization of a positive vision that prophecy is put to the test.

So it was with Israel’s prophets. They were realists, not optimists. They warned of the dangers that lay ahead. But they were also, without exception, agents of hope. They could see beyond the catastrophe to the consolation. That is the test of a true prophet.

Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

Third Time this Ramadan – Tomb of the Patriarchs Desecrated by Muslims

Sunday, August 4th, 2013

For the third time this month of Ramadan, Muslims visiting the Tomb of Patriarchs in Hebron have desecrated Jewish religious objects at the site, tearing the Mezuzahs off the doorposts and stealing them. They took advantage of the special visiting privileges the Muslims receive from the IDF during the month of Ramadan, during which, on Fridays and a few special days, the Tomb of Patriarchs is open only to Muslims.

Local police announced they have arrested two Palestinians in connection with the vandalism, but are still searching for the thieves. The act was recorded by surveillance cameras. A member of the Waqf was nearby during the act of vandalism.

In response to the repeated attacks, the site management has decided to limit the access of Palestinians. Muslims aged 18 – 35 will not be permitted in on the special days allocated to Muslims only. Further actions are being considered to prevent these attacks in the future.

Following the previous attack, Member of Knesset Orit Struk, a resident of Hebron, told Tazpit News Agency: “The Arabs used the opportunity they had on Friday to desecrate the Mezuzot. We cannot be silent about this incident. During the 700 years of Muslim occupation, the Tomb of the Patriarchs was completely closed to Jews. Today, when the State of Israel is considerate of Muslim holidays and permits them full use of the site – they exploit it to harm Jewish symbols. I expect the Muslim leaders in Hebron and Israel to apologize to the Jewish People and condemn this heinous episode.”

Aryeh Savir, Tazpit News Agency

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/third-time-this-ramadan-tomb-of-the-patriarchs-desecrated-by-muslims/2013/08/04/

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