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December 9, 2016 / 9 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Stone’

Israeli Arab Stone Throwers Damage Buses on Highway to Jerusalem

Monday, October 17th, 2016

For the second time in recent days, stone throwing Israeli Arabs on Monday night inflicted damages on a bus going through the Ginaton Junction, where Route 40 and Highway 443 to Jerusalem meet

Another bus windshield was smashed in a stone throwing attack on a bus Monday night, near the Haredi City of Beitar Ilit. The driver was evacuated to Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem.

David Israel

Israeli Arrested After Firing Gun at Stone Throwers

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

A resident of Alon Moreh came under rock attack around noon on Sunday as he was driving between Itamar and Alon Moreh, according to a report on Rotter.net.

The Israeli man fired his licensed personal handgun at the attackers, but didn’t hit them.

The police arrested the man and brought him in for questioning.

Jewish Press News Briefs

The Foundation Stone: Parshat Shoftim: Seeking Justice

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

{Originally posted to Rabbi Weinberg’s website, The Foundation Stone}

A woman, suffering serious financial hardship due to the dishonesty of outwardly observant friends who are supported by the community, declares her rejection of Torah beliefs.

A man who rightfully prides himself on his honesty leaves a hearing before a Rabbinical Court wondering where was justice.

A six-year-old girl, after overhearing her parents speak of the injustice of the UN sponsored Schabas Commission is terrified that we live in a world without justice.

 

“Righteousness, righteousness, shall you pursue (Deuteronomy 16:20),” teaches us that righteousness in a specific case is insufficient. We must seek to create an environment in which people expect justice.

 

Whether speaking to us of a king, a prophet, the desire for vengeance, war, or even an unsolved murder, the Torah insists that we create an environment in which that woman would feel confident that her community would provide justice.

 

We are obligated to insist on rabbinical courts that provide us with the security of justice so that man will never leave a religious court convinced he would have done better in a secular court.

 

We are told that our society must be so clearly just that a child will not shiver whenever she hears of the UN or the NY Times.

 

The Torah clearly holds community leaders responsible. The High Priest is held responsible when someone accidentally kills someone else (Numbers 35:28). City elders are responsible for the unsolved murder of a stranger (Deuteronomy 21:6). “But you shall remove the innocent blood from your midst when you do what is upright in the eyes of God (21:9).” What shall we do when we lose our sense of what is just and upright in the eyes of God?

 

“Restore our judges as in earliest times, and our counselors as at first; remove from us sorrow and groan; and speedily reign over us, You, God, alone, with kindness and compassion. Blessed are You, God, the King, Who loves righteousness and justice (Daily Prayer).” Rabbeinu Yonah understands this almost as a challenge of God: How can You expect us to follow Your ways if you abandon us to a world without justice (Berachot 19b on Rif)!

 

Our obligation is to create a strong sense of justice in our homes, schools and communities. “Righteousness, righteousness, shall you pursue,” in all we do, in every conversation, in every interaction with a child or stranger, with every word we speak to or of another. If we succeed in developing a strong sense of justice in our homes and communities, perhaps our prayer for God to restore justice will be justly heard and accepted.

 

Rabbi Simcha Weinberg

The Foundation Stone: A Sense Of Place

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

{Originally posted to Rabbi Weinberg’s website, The Foundation Stone}

A sense of place, especially God’s place, is frequently too far, inaccessible, and unreachable. The man, who lost his job and money, loses his place in his community, if not his home. A sick child stuck in a hospital away from her family loses her sense of place. The desperate mother who enters a synagogue for the first time in years to pray for that sick child will often feel out of place. A young man, leaving the safe walls of Yeshiva to work “out in the world,” will struggle to find his place.

A child, with whom parents are angry or who overhears parents arguing, a student in trouble at school, a couple experiencing tension, all feel out of place. Israeli families that live close to Gaza and are too terrified to return home, have lost their place. European Jews, experiencing the open anti-semitism on the streets, have lost their sense of place, as have we, post Tisha b’Av, when we mourned the historical destructions of Jerusalem. And yet, now, as we begin the approach to Rosh Hashana, hear God calling us home. What are those who have lost their home to do?

We can, of course, find our place in the abstract and ethereal. Yet, we are warned, “Beware for yourself lest you bring up your elevation offerings in any place that you see (Deuteronomy 12:13).” The Ha’amak Davar explains that one who seeks to elevate his relationship with God will strive to do so wherever he is, but must do so only in a place that is set aside for such elevation, such as the Temple, synagogue, or study hall. What are we to do when we cannot go to the Temple, and when we feel out of place in a synagogue or study hall?

This week’s portion, Re’ei, speaks of our need for a sense of place, how difficult it often is to find, and how we must protect others’ sense of place. It also guides us in how to manage the experience of ‘no place.’ It addresses the sanctity of the Land of Israel, private altars, and the proper place to eat sanctified foods, a place for the blood of slaughtered animals, the wayward city, and the Pilgrimage Festivals. We are taught to be sensitive to the poor person’s loss of place, and forbidden from eating a fish that carries its home, its place: shellfish.

Our experience of distance from the proper place is described in the laws of the Second Tithe that must be eaten in Jerusalem. “If the road will be too long for you, so that you cannot carry it [Second Tithe], because the place that God, Your Lord, will choose to place His name there is far from you, for God, your Lord, will have blessed you, then you may exchange it for money, wrap up the money in your hand, and go to the place that God, your Lord, will choose (14:24-25).”

There is a step in our service of God that encourages us to wrap up all the moments, insights and experiences that lack a proper place, so that, when found, we can bring them to the right place.

I recently read a quote from J.G. Ballard, “One of the things I took from my wartime experiences was that reality was a stage set. The comfortable day-to-day life, school, the home where one lives and all the rest of it, could be dismantled overnight.” I realized that when moving from one city to another, changing jobs, or while in extended stays in hospitals in Argentina and Germany, I have always sought to find my place in things that could not be dismantled. I find my place when I wrap myself in Tallit and Tefillin and pray, when sitting at a Shabbat table, and, most of all, when I study Torah. I then wrap up those experiences by incorporating them into my regular prayers, studies, and service. I hold on to those places inside of me, waiting for the opportunity to bring them to that place that God will choose for me. I carry those places inside of me, much as Noah grabbed a vine from the Garden of Eden to carry on the Ark and replant in the new world so that the Garden would remain a real place.

When Rosh Hashana begins to call out with the Elul Shofar blasts, its invitation to come home, I hear it in all those internal places I have managed to wrap up. As long as those places inside resonate to the call, I know that I will one day reach that place that will never be dismantled.

Chodesh Tov and Shabbat Shalom

 

Rabbi Simcha Weinberg

Woman Wounded in Arab Stone Throwing Attack [video]

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

A 30-year-old woman suffered wounds to her face after Arabs threw a large stone through her car’s windshield as she was driving along Highway 60. The attack happened just before 10:30 AM.

The attack happened near the Okfim junction, close to El Aroub and Kiryat Arba. This is the same area where Asher Palmer and his 2-year-old son were murdered by Arabs in a rock throwing attack on September 23, 2011.

One of the medics who treated the woman was Ofer Ohana. Ohana was on his way to court to provide testimony for the soldier in Hebron who killed the downed terrorist. Ohana was the medic on site after the Hebron terror attack.

The woman has been transported to Sharei Tzedek hospital. She’s listed in lightly wounded condition with injuries to her face.

Jewish Press News Briefs

One Injured when Arabs Stone Worshipers at Kotel, Netanyahu Capitulates on Temple Mount [video]

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

On Tuesday morning, Arab rioters on the Temple Mount who presumably found no more Jews or police to attack up there, began throwing stones down at the Jews who were engaged in their morning prayer before the Western Wall. One woman, age 73, was injured lightly and was rushed to Hadassah Ein Karem hospital. (Update: The woman was released from the hospital late Tuesday afternoon).

Once again this week Israel has taught the Arab rioters on the Temple Mount that crime pays, and violent crime pays double. Following two days of violent riots on the sacred grounds, during which Arab youths threw stones and fireworks at security forces, police on Tuesday morning banned the entrance of Jewish and all other non-Muslim visitors, which is what the violent mob was demanding in the first place.

The announcement about the banning of Jews came before the Arabs started throwing rocks down on Jewish worshipers by the Kotel.

The Arabs argued that there had been a status quo according to which on the final ten days of the month of Ramadan no non-Muslim was allowed to set foot on the ground where a scene from dream of the prophet Mohammad took place back in the seventh century (he never actually set foot there).

For two days straight, Arab rioters barricaded themselves inside the Al Aqsa mosque, where they stored stones and fireworks, determined to interrupt the peaceful routine of Jewish visits to the Temple Mount. As soon as the first visitors had entered, Muslim youths, some of them masked, burst out of the mosque, screaming stuff about the supremacy of Allah (He is, apparently, very big) and throwing stones at the frightened visitors and at police. Police and Border Guard pushed back the attackers, and enabled the continued visits.

Israel Police issued a communiqué Monday saying that any attempt to violate the order anywhere in Jerusalem, including in the Old City and on the Temple Mount would be handled “resolutely and firmly,” in order to maintain the status quo allowing members of all religions to be on the Temple Mount. “Jerusalem Police will use all the tools at its disposal to arrest the rioters and to prosecute them to the full extent of the law.”

Nekhtike Tug, goes the Yiddish adage, meaning, roughly, go find the stuff you lost yesterday, or, basically, it wasn’t happening. Because overnight Monday, according to an Israel Radio report, there were talks between the Netanyahu government and the Jordanians, whose Waqf association is the de facto ruler of the sacred compound, and a decision was made to bow to the will of the thugs one more time.

Let it be a lesson to them.

David Israel

Child Injured in Stone Throwing

Sunday, June 19th, 2016

A child was lightly injured on Saturday night after their car was hit by stones near the entrance to Sha’ar Binyamin, north of Jerusalem.

There was some confusion when emergency responders couldn’t find the vehicle near Sha’ar Binyamin.

It turns out, the father drove them directly to the emergency room at Hadassah-Mount Scopus after the attack. The boy was injured from the fragments of glass.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/child-injured-in-stone-throwing/2016/06/19/

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