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September 1, 2014 / 6 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘baby’

IDF Helicopter Transports Woman in Labor to Hospital

Saturday, December 14th, 2013

Over Shabbat, a woman from Yitzhar began having contractions.

Unable to get to the hospital because of the snow on the road, an IDF helicopter was called in.

The helicopter landed in Yitzhar and transported the woman to Beilinson Hospital in Petach Tikva.

No news yet if it was a boy or a girl.

14 Pound Baby Born in Haifa

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

A 13-pound-7-ounce (6.245 kilograms) baby born at the Rambam Health Care Campus in Haifa this week surprised his mother and doctors, who were not able to find proper baby pajamas in his size after he was delivered by C-section in the 38th week of pregnancy.

The doctors calculated that the baby born is the approximate size and weight of a six-month old infant. Guinness recently reported that a baby weighing 13.49 pounds (6.12 kilograms) was born in Germany this July and in August, a baby weighing 13.66 pounds (6.2 kilograms) was born in Spain.

“This is the second largest baby that was born in the 35 years that I’ve worked at Rambam,” said Prof. Shraga Blazer, the director of the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. “Twenty years ago, I delivered a baby that weighed 6.3 kilograms (about 13.9 pounds). But even when I worked in the U.S., I did not see such a thing.”

Mother and baby are being monitored at the hospital.

American Culture: How to Reconcile the Brutal and the Effete?

Monday, August 26th, 2013

Originally published at Rubin Reports.

I’m deeply confused about American culture. Let me cite two incidents as examples and then talk about some attitudes I hear about from my son’s reports on visits with friends. Perhaps readers can explain this contradiction between the effete and the brutal.

Arriving in the United States, I go to the nearby Trader Joe’s food store. It is of course very PC. At the checkout counter, the clerk asks, “Have you returned anything?” I did a double-take. Is this a bid for higher taxes? A taunt to the 1 percent who shop there?

No, he explains that they have some kind of program about bringing back bags. “The people in Bethesda,” he smugly asserts, “are the smartest!”

By coincidence, I had just heard some article saying that using returned bags is potentially dangerous since there can be some food remnants that rot and may breed bacteria. (I certainly don’t know what is true scientifically.) Unable to resist, and out of curiosity, I said, “Maybe they are not the smartest,” and explained my concern.

Instantly, he changed his attitude, snarled and said, “They’re the smartest!” No contradiction would be tolerated. Anyway, he started it. But given all the waste involved in a supermarket business–let’s start with the packaging–the small but highly right-thinking-people gesture of reused bags strikes me as a laughable symbol. Not to mention the fact that Trader Joe’s isn’t giving out food to the poor or opening stores to take big losses in what Michelle Obama calls, “food deserts.”

Is this salvation on the cheap, like those in wealthy California coastal cities that take away the farmers’ water to save some obscure fish and then congratulate themselves on their enlightenment?

About the same time, I sit in a sandwich place and a song comes on the radio. My jaw drops. A female singer repeats the lyric, “I said drive, bitch,” apparently it’s a car-jacking? She just keeps going over and over again in a very aggressive tone. At the end, the sound effect indicates that the female driver has been shot and fell down dead.

I sat there speechless. I simply couldn’t believe what I was hearing. If there is a “war on women” isn’t it actually waged most vigorously in certain sectors of popular music? The same could be said of the music of the much honored Jay-Z or many others.

Now perhaps this is a silly taking of two extreme phenomena, and I’ll accept that verdict if that’s what you think. But it symbolizes perhaps a bigger thing. On one hand, American culture today (should I say popular culture?) is one of watch your language, goody-goody, we are just so virtuous. There is rap music and the message given to children in Politically Correct lessons.

On the other hand, though, on film, television, literature, music, and public discourse it is intolerant and at times proudly brutal. Is that a valid observation? And if so how is this tension reconciled?

During a visit to the United States, conversations among young teenage boys, who in school were subjected to intense indoctrination, run like this:

–They make fun of alleged gays among them, flinging the charge as insulting but then quickly adding, not that there’s anything wrong with that.

–They show very vile disrespect toward girls of their age. It doesn’t seem that there is any change over the decades, but there certainly isn’t a reduction of “sexist” attitudes. They discuss them far more openly. The concept of gentleman or even restrained behavior is gone, perhaps in conjunction with the musical examples. Attitudes that would once have been derided as “low-class” by the elite have now become common place. So how is there then an elite setting a good example?

–They use far more racial epithets and negative stereotypes of others than my generation, though it is covered by frequent accusations that this or that is racist. Dubbing of something as racism is used as a weapon, a description of something one doesn’t like.

–They see themselves as part of some downtrodden class even though they are financially well-off. For example, they talk about rich white people but when pointed out that they live in big houses, they say the houses are bigger in some other neighborhoods.

Peres Sends ‘Mazal Tov” to Kate and William

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

President Peres sent a special message of congratulations on Tuesday in honor of the birth of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge’s new baby.

He also sent a special gift of a baby suit with an embroidered message on it – “From Israel with Love”

“From Jerusalem, Israel, I want to express our happiness and prayers for the young prince,” President Peres wrote. “Never in my life did I see the people of the world so united in happiness. It was a demonstration of where royalty helps democracy and where the people have shown what a true democracy is. The streets were full and smiles were on everybody’s face.

“I am happy to see the whole world so happy with the birth of this young boy. I am 90 years old, so I saw his father when he was a young boy and now I hope we shall see this newly born prince, doing his job in the most democratic and royal manner. The world became richer with this event.

God bless the Queen, From Jerusalem, Mazal Tov!”

Kate Gave Birth in a Jewish-Funded Hospital Wing

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

When the duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton was rushed to the Lindo Wing at St. Mary’s Hospital early Monday, anxious to avoid hundreds of paparazzi camping outside, she almost certainly missed the little plaque at the entrance.

The memorial pays tribute to the anonymous donor “who was not unmindful of his neighbors’ needs” and who paid for the wing in 1937.

In fact he wasn’t so anonymous: the wing is named after him. Frank Charles Lindo was a wealthy Jew, descended on his mother Adeline’s side from the Heilbut family, and on his father Charles’s side, it appears, from one of London’s most famous Sephardi families. While it is not clear exactly how he is related, the Lindo name is particularly associated with the silver Lindo Lamp, the earliest known English menorah, which was commissioned in 1709 on the marriage of Elias Lindo to Rachel Lopes Ferreira.

Born in 1872, Frank Lindo married Violet Portman, a member of a British aristocratic family and a member of the board of management at St Mary’s. When Lindo died in 1938, he had donated £111,500 to the hospital, including £5,000 on the morning of the opening of the Lindo Wing so that it could open free of debt. While nowadays considered state-of-the-art, at the time it was meant for  ”patients of moderate means” who could not afford private care but were too well off to be treated in a charity hospital for the “deserving poor.”

In his will, Lindo left his house at Aldeburgh to the hospital as a convalescent home for the nursing staff, with an endowment fund of £25,000 for its maintenance.

“His gifts, sympathy and understanding made possible the erection and equipment of this building for the relief of sickness and suffering,” says the memorial plaque, “and will remain for all time a monument of his outstanding generosity.”

Surely he would have shepped much nachas from the royal baby born in the birthing suite he funded.

Rock-Throwing Terrorists Injure ‘Latma’ Star

Monday, July 1st, 2013

On Sunday night, rock-throwing terrorists in the Shomron smashed the window of a family car with grapefruit sized rocks, injuring one of the passengers.

Ronit Avrahamof Shapira, one of two “newscasters” in Caroline Glick’s satirical YouTube production “Latma,” wrote on her Facebook page that her husband Laizy, the director of the popular Israeli TV series “Srugim”, was driving the family car when he spotted rocks on the road and warned his wife to protect herself and their children from an imminent rock attack.

The rocks then hit the window, shattering the glass and injuring Ronit in the hands and face as she provided cover for their children. The rocks just missed their heads, but her blood from the shards of glass dripped onto her baby.

Ronit wrote, “In the newscasts tomorrow, people will once again wag their fingers about the ‘terrible terrorism’ in which walls are sprayed with ‘price tag’ slogans, and ignore – once again – an attempted murder, one of many that take place on our roads every day, because who cares?”

“Our partners in peace want us to die. That is what they want. One cannot make peace with murderers. The murderers have blood on their hands and I have blood on my forehead. Shalom.”

Rabbi Uzi Meshulam (60)

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Rabbi Uzi Meshulam (60) died on Friday afternoon.

Meshulam was an activist who claimed that thousands of Yemenite babies were taken away from their families by the Israeli government when they were brought to Israel between 1948 and 1954 .

Meshulam’s activism escalated until it resulted in a standoff between Israeli police and Meshulam’s followers in 1994, which left one person dead, and 11 people arrested.

But the end result was that the government established the Cohen Committee in 1995 to uncover where the missing Yemenite children went.

The committee provided explanations for many of the disappearances, though a few cases remained unexplained, and are still open. The committee said there was no government conspiracy.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/rabbi-uzi-meshulam-60/2013/06/21/

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