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January 16, 2017 / 18 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘baby’

Build, Baby, Build

Wednesday, December 28th, 2016

There’s really only one suitable Zionist response to last week’s UN Security Council resolution on the settlements: massive settlement construction. That’s the appropriate response for more than one reason, but I’ll focus here on the most obvious one: The resolution proves conclusively that Israel gets no credit for showing restraint on this issue, so there’s no earthly reason why it should continue suffering the costs of restraint.

As I’ve written repeatedly in the past, data from Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics shows that there has been less settlement construction under Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu than under any of his predecessors. Nor is this a matter of partisan dispute: The left-wing daily Haaretz, a virulent opponent of both Netanyahu and the settlements, used the same data to reach the same conclusion last year.

Moreover, fully three-quarters of the growth in the settlements’ population under Netanyahu has been in the major blocs, which every serious international peace proposal for decades has concluded will remain Israeli under any Israeli-Palestinian deal. Again, this isn’t a matter of partisan dispute; that three-quarters figure comes from Shaul Arieli, a veteran peace activist who is also a virulent opponent of Netanyahu and the settlements.

Finally, almost all the growth in the settler population under Netanyahu has stemmed from natural increase – i.e. women having babies – rather than people actually moving to the settlements. The Haaretz report put the proportion at 74 percent; Arieli’s study, which is more recent, put it at almost 90 percent. Either way, the bottom line is that the only way Israel could have prevented this growth was by passing legislation requiring the forced sterilization of every woman in the settlements. Even the UN hasn’t demanded that yet.

For Netanyahu, this restraint has come at a real price. First, it caused him political damage, because it infuriated his voter base. The result, as I’ve noted before, is that by last month, he was facing an open revolt in his own party over the issue.

Second, it caused Israel strategic damage, because it kept the country from strengthening its hold over areas that most Israeli governments have considered essential for security under any future agreement. To take just one example, all Israeli premiers have deemed the E1 corridor, which links Jerusalem with the Ma’aleh Adumim settlement bloc, critical for Israel’s security – even Yitzhak Rabin, the patron saint of the peace process. Moreover, E1 in no way prevents the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state, and has actually been assigned to Israel by every serious international peace plan ever proposed. Yet for years, Israel has refrained from building there out of deference to international public opinion, even as illegal Palestinian construction has mushroomed in this formerly empty area. The result is that it now has no “facts on the ground” to act as a counterweight to Palestinian claims. And since Palestinian claims always enjoy the international community’s automatic support, facts on the ground, in the form of large numbers of Israelis whom it’s

simply too difficult to evacuate, are Israel’s best guarantee of retaining areas it deems essential to its security.

Third, settlement restraint has caused major financial damage by exacerbating Israel’s massive housing crisis. As of last year, the price of an average apartment had soared to 146 average monthly salaries, more than double the ratio in most other countries, and up from just 43 in 2008; rents have risen correspondingly. In short, housing in Israel has simply become unaffordable for most people, and that’s a major threat to Israel’s future: People will neither remain in nor move to a country where they can’t even afford to put a roof over their head. Yet substantial building in the settlement blocs and eastern Jerusalem – where Netanyahu has also imposed an undeclared freeze in deference to the international community – could have alleviated the shortage responsible for this massive price rise. The settlement blocs are all within commuting distance of the center of the country, which is where the jobs are, and thus where people want to live; inside the Green Line, in contrast, there are few empty areas left in the country’s narrow waist. And in Jerusalem, the housing shortage is the main reason why the capital loses some 18,000 Jews every year.

Netanyahu was willing to absorb all this damage in the belief that international leaders, regardless of what they said publicly, would know the truth about the brakes he has put on settlement construction and support him when it mattered. But to most of the world, the facts have never mattered where Israel is concerned, and it turns out the same is true of the post-truth Obama Administration: Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes justified America’s support for the resolution (and support is the right word, because in this case, abstaining was no different than voting yes) with the spurious claim that the vote was motivated by an “acceleration of settlement activity” under Netanyahu.

It’s hard to say what impact the resolution will actually have, but there are at least two possible negative consequences. First, its declaration that the settlements are “a flagrant violation under international law” could spur the International Criminal Court, which is already considering a case against Israel over the settlements, to go ahead with it, by assuring prosecutor Fatou Bensouda that such action would enjoy widespread international support. Second, its demand that all states “distinguish, in their relevant dealings, between the territory of the State of Israel and the territories occupied since 1967” provides a tailwind for international boycotts and sanctions against Israel and Israeli companies, since Israel itself considers some of those territories – for example, the Western Wall – to be sovereign Israeli territory.

So if Israel is going to be accused of “accelerated settlement activity” and slapped with potentially serious consequences no matter how much restraint it shows, there’s no justification whatsoever for it to incur the very real costs of this restraint. Hence there’s only one sensible response to this resolution: Build, baby, build.

Evelyn Gordon

Noah and Noam Most Popular Israeli Jewish Names, for Arabs: Mariam and… Mohammed

Monday, December 28th, 2015

(JNi.media) The most common name in Israel in 2014 was Mohammed, as 2,650 Muslim boys born in 2014 were given that name, according to a new release from the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics. The second most popular name was Noam, given to about 2,000 children, of whom about 1,600 were Jewish boys and about 400 girls. The third most common name in 2014 was Yoseph, given to about 1,350 Jewish newborn boys and 600 tiny Muslim boys. In fourth place came the name Ariel, given to both Jewish boys and girls, about 1,300 and 500, respectively. Other popular unisex names were Uri and Daniel.

Here are more name-related stats for 2014, courtesy of the CBS:

If the most popular name among for Jewish boys was Noam, given to 1,600 newborn males, the most common name for newly born Jewish girls was Noah, with 1478 given it, making Noah the most common name for Jewish women in 15 years.

The Mohammed or Ahmed choice was made for one in five Muslim boys, 2600 and 968, respectively.

Among Muslim girls the most common name was Mariam — 419.

In 2012 only 36 Jewish boys were named Ovadia. In 2013, the year Rabbi Ovadia Yosef passed away, 117 boys were given the name, and in 2014 209.

Eitan (Ethan) climbed from tenth to seventh place among Jewish boys—the increase taking place during Operation Tzuk Eitan (a.k.a. Operation Protective Edge).

Adele continues to be popular, and there has been an increas in the number of girls given this name.

Finally — the name Romy is on the rise, to No. 15 after being ranked 29th the year before.

Have a sweet new calendar year, and don’t forget to check on little Mohammed and little Noah before you turn off the lights.

JNi.Media

Power Couple

Friday, June 26th, 2015

While the talk of the town yesterday was the religious woman, Lt. R. from Jerusalem, who graduated in yesterday’s class of new fighter pilots, she was far from the only religious personality in yesterday’s elite group.

25-year-old Lt. B. made a fateful decision to leave his Hesder yeshiva a few years ago, and try his hand at becoming a fighter pilot too, after getting permission from his Rosh Yeshiva.

But Lt. B. had another boss he had to confer with first… his wife.

Mrs. Lt. H. isn’t just his wife, but also an officer/engineer in a classified intelligence unit. She agreed, but on one condition… they have a baby.

Two years ago, and one year into the Lt. B.’s 3 year pilot course, their baby girl was born.

Lt. B. graduated yesterday as a combat navigator.

Did we mention… they’re also settlers living in the Shomron.

Video of the Day

Convicted Terrorists Still Have Drivers’ Licenses, But . . .

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

A terrorist who has murdered Jews with a bulldozer, for instance, can still be holding his driver’s license and be able to get right back into the cab of a vehicle when he gets out of prison. Yes.

But if the Legal Forum for Israel has its way, this situation may not continue much longer.

The organization has appealed to Transportation and Road Safety Minister Yisrael Katz to revoke the drivers’ licenses of those who are convicted of terror activities.

Forum attorney Yossi Fuchs wrote to Katz that Abdul Rahman al-Shaloudi, the terrorist who murdered a three month old baby in a terror attack in Jerusalem Wednesday night and wounded numerous others, was a recidivist.

He called on Katz to submit an amendment to the current motor vehicle law, blocking convicting terrorists from holding a valid driver’s license once released from prison.

Shaloudi had been convicted of terrorism before, and had been released from prison just 10 months prior to carrying out his deadly attack.

“The prison term was no real warning to him, and he instead decided to use his drivers’ license as a license to murder Jews, as was seen in last night’s attack,” Fuchs wrote.

The attorney proposed an amendment that would require revocation of a driver’s license for a period of one year or more – until the terrorist finishes serving his or her sentence – and until such time as the Israel Security Agency (Shin Bet) deems the driver no longer a security risk.

The revocation should be made in cases of terror activities that include rock attacks, not necessarily related to the use of a motor vehicle, Fuchs said.

The terrorist who prompted the proposed amendment is dead. He died of his wounds in the hospital after being shot by a police officer while trying to flee the scene of his motor vehicle attack on a crowd of bystanders waiting for the Jerusalem Light Rail.

His victim, tiny American citizen Chaya Zisel Braun, was laid to rest late the same night in Jerusalem’s ancient soil.

Hana Levi Julian

No More Lies, Sec. Kerry, There Is No ‘Existential Threat to Israel’

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

Is Secretary of State, John Kerry correct, or incorrect, when exhorting “the demographic time bomb” to scare Israel into a retreat from geography (Judea and Samaria), in order to, supposedly, secure demography?  According to Kerry, “There is an existential threat to Israel…. I am referring to the demographic dynamic that makes it impossible for Israel to preserve its future as a democratic, Jewish state without resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in a two-state solution.”

Are Jews doomed to become a minority in the combined area of Judea, Samaria and the pre-1967 Israel?

According to the 2013 CIA World Factbook,  Judea and Samaria Arabs  experienced a dramatic decline in fertility rate (the average number of births per woman): from five births in 2000 to 2.91 in 2013.  On the other hand, in 2014, Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics documents a 3.04 Jewish fertility rate and 3.42 when both Jewish spouses are Israeli-born.

“A new Palestinian generation opts for fewer children is the title of an article by Rasha Abou Jalal, a Gaza journalist:  While Islam calls for believers to bear many children and prohibits the use of birth control, new Palestinian generations are defying tradition and leaning toward limiting the number of children they have…. The new generation takes into consideration various economic and cultural factors before deciding to have children.  The idea of limiting childbearing has, therefore, garnered more supporters than before…. The more Palestinians become aware and rational, the less they will procreate, as they pursue a level of education and knowledge that suits them and increases their chances of having a better life….

The Westernization of Muslim demographic trends, from Iran (1.8 births per woman), through Saudi Arabia (2.3), Syria and Egypt (2.9) and North Africa (1.8) has also characterized Muslim women in Judea, Samaria, Gaza and pre-1967 Israel. The unprecedented decline in Muslim fertility has been driven by modernity: accelerated women’s rights, urbanization, education, career mentality and family planning (72% of 15-49 year old married Palestinian women prefer to avoid pregnancy).  Thus, contemporary young Muslim women are reluctant to get married at the age of fifteen and start reproducing at the age of sixteen.  They tend to postpone marriage until after the age of 20 and prefer limited reproduction.

On the other hand, in 2014, the Israeli Jewish fertility rate (three births per woman and trending upwards) is higher than in any Arab country, other than Yemen, Iraq and Jordan.  Jewish demography has been enhanced by a high level of optimism, patriotism, communal responsibility and attachment to roots among religious and secular, hawks and doves, conservative and liberal Israelis, bolstered by economic progress. While the annual number of Arab births – west of the Jordan River – has stabilized since 1995, the annual number of Jewish births has surged from 80,000 in 1995 to about 132,000 in 2013 – a 65% increase!  This dramatic leap occurred despite declining fertility among ultra-orthodox Jews, but due to the substantial rise of secular Jewish fertility.  In 1995 there were 2.3 Jewish births per one Arab birth in Israel; in 2014 – 3.3 births.  In 1995, the number of Jewish births constituted 69% of total Israeli births; in 2014 – 77% and rising.

In 2014, there is a robust 66% Jewish majority in the combined area of Judea, Samaria and pre-1967 Israel – compared with a 9% and 39% in 1900 and 1947 – benefitting from a tailwind of fertility and net-immigration.  This contrasts with declining Arab fertility and annual Arab net-emigration (in 2014, 20,000 from Judea and Samaria).  In 2014, Israel’s Jewish population has reached 6.5 million people, next to 1.7 million Israeli Arabs and 1.7 million Judean and Samarian Arabs – one million less than the number claimed by the Palestinian Authority.  The misrepresentation was conceived in the late 1990s, in response to the arrival of one million Soviet Jews to Israel.  It consists of overseas residents, overseas births, by double-counting Jerusalem Arabs as Israeli Arabs (by Israel) and West Bankers (by the Palestinian Authority), etc..

Yoram Ettinger

IDF Helicopter Transports Woman in Labor to Hospital

Saturday, December 14th, 2013

Over Shabbat, a woman from Yitzhar began having contractions.

Unable to get to the hospital because of the snow on the road, an IDF helicopter was called in.

The helicopter landed in Yitzhar and transported the woman to Beilinson Hospital in Petach Tikva.

No news yet if it was a boy or a girl.

Jewish Press News Briefs

14 Pound Baby Born in Haifa

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

A 13-pound-7-ounce (6.245 kilograms) baby born at the Rambam Health Care Campus in Haifa this week surprised his mother and doctors, who were not able to find proper baby pajamas in his size after he was delivered by C-section in the 38th week of pregnancy.

The doctors calculated that the baby born is the approximate size and weight of a six-month old infant. Guinness recently reported that a baby weighing 13.49 pounds (6.12 kilograms) was born in Germany this July and in August, a baby weighing 13.66 pounds (6.2 kilograms) was born in Spain.

“This is the second largest baby that was born in the 35 years that I’ve worked at Rambam,” said Prof. Shraga Blazer, the director of the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. “Twenty years ago, I delivered a baby that weighed 6.3 kilograms (about 13.9 pounds). But even when I worked in the U.S., I did not see such a thing.”

Mother and baby are being monitored at the hospital.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/14-pound-baby-born-in-haifa/2013/09/12/

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