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November 24, 2014 / 2 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Benjamin Netanyahu’

Great News: US Has Security Plan for the ‘West Bank’

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

One has to be sparing with exclamation points, but this one’s a lollapalooza.  A dilly!  A doozie.  A big honkin’ mess-a that Middle East Security Hotness.  You heard right folks:  the United States of America has a “West Bank security proposal” for Israel, and we’re sending a retired Army general to present it to Mr. Benjamin Netanyahu, himself.  !!!!!!!!!!

Why did no one think of this before?  Finally, someone has done something pragmatic and positive about the Israeli-Palestinian standoff, and just written up a proposal for the Israelis to chew on already.  The Obama administration has at last gotten things off top dead center with Iran, and it’s time to tackle those other intractable Middle East Security Problems, while the momentum is still red-hot.

The New York Times has done yeoman work in recent years pitching verbatim the information themes of the Obama administration, but interestingly, it comes off as a tad perfunctory in the story about the West Bank security proposal.  The tale seems to lack a little of that believer’s heart to it.  You might almost get the sense that there’s some editorial skepticism about the wisdom of this fresh Brainstorming for Peace initiative.

Almost.  Letting the Obama administration off the hook, as usual, for vagueness and strange diplomatic fire, NYT notes the following:

General Allen’s presentation appears to signify a more active American role, in which the United States is doing more than coaxing the Israelis and the Palestinians to negotiate and is presenting its own ideas.

What are the ideas about, exactly?  The NYT authors again:

Officials involved in the negotiations said security had been the prime focus lately, with most of the discussion revolving around the Jordan Valley. Israel has insisted that its own military continue to patrol there, rather than rely on an international force similar to those responsible for its tense borders with Lebanon and Syria. The Palestinians have said they cannot abide the presence of any Israeli soldiers in their future state.

Keep in mind, if George W. Bush’s officials were being so elliptical about a U.S.-drafted West Bank security proposal, NYT would be right in there concluding indignantly that American troops were about to be drop-kicked into the Jordan Valley to embroil a duped and overextended United States in Another Vietnam Quagmire (Marine Barracks Beirut Variety).  It would be barely possible to figure out what the Bush administration had actually said, so thick would be the underbrush of quotes from policy “critics” through which the reader would have to hack.

No such quotes enliven the current NYT piece.  The Obama administration gets the benefit of the doubt.  Maybe putting U.S. prestige and bona fides on the line with an unsolicited, and apparently very specific, security proposal to an ally isn’t a bad idea.  Maybe it’s not undiplomatic and prejudicial to announce it publicly before our briefer has even presented it to Israel’s prime minister.  Maybe it’s just, what, enthusiastic.  Maybe there’s nothing to be concerned about in the fact that the preemptive announcement is so vague.  Hey, we’re just talking – probably – a about U.S. proposal for administering military security in the Jordan Valley.  What could go wrong?

NYT lets this priceless, preemptive characterization go without comment:

State Department officials described the security briefing as an “ongoing process” and not a finished product on which the United States was demanding a yes-or-no vote from the Israeli side.

Sure, because announcing it in advance will put no onus on Israel to respond in a yes-or-no-type manner.  This formulation is like an addict pleading that he’s not using, he’s just snorting some coke.

Shiite Convert’s Attack on Nuclear Deal Spells Out America’s Future

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

Yuram Abdullah Weiler, an American from Denver, Co. who converted to Islam in 2003, has been a frequent contributor to the Tehran Times. He still lives in Denver, offering, as his paper puts it, “a dissenting voice from the ‘Belly of the Beast.’”

His Saturday column was titled “Pulling the Nuclear Knife Out of Iran’s Back,” and like many converts, Weiler manages to channel the most self-righteous, victimized voice of the Mullahs he so admires.

He opens with a quote from Malcolm X, a quote that turns victimization into poetry: “If you stick a knife nine inches into my back and pull it out three inches, that is not progress. Even if you pull it all the way out, that is not progress. Progress is healing the wound, and America hasn’t even begun to pull out the knife.”

I don’t know when Malcolm said this, if he did. I did find a much angrier quote, about the foot-long knife the White Man stuck in the Black Man’s back 400 years ago, and should the former jerk the knife out, should the latter feel grateful? That sounds more like Malcolm X. The quote in the Tehran Times—although I’ve seen it in recent posts online—reads too whiney for Malcolm X.

There’s too much victim’s tears in the first quote, which Weler chose as the opener for his attack on everyone: America, the West, the “Zionist entity,” anyone who won’t serve up what is Iran’s inalienable right: to trade however much it wants to, while preparing as many nukes as it wishes.

To read Weiler, which I recommend, is to realize he actually believes it’s Iran that’s been duped here. The knife in its back? Why, it’s the original sanctions placed on it. And now the only proper thing the west can do is to restore things to the way they’re supposed to be and walk away.

In Weiler’s world, which is consistent with the Ayatollahs’, only the Russians seem to get it right:

No sooner had the ink dried on the Geneva plan when Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry began to express diverging views on whether or not the agreement recognized Iran’s inalienable right to enrich uranium. “This deal means that we agree with the need to recognize Iran’s right for peaceful nuclear energy, including the right for enrichment,” Lavrov affirmed. Iran’s top nuclear negotiator, Deputy Foreign Minister Seyyed Abbas Araqchi, concurred that the agreement indeed recognizes Iran’s right to enrich uranium, and in fact states explicitly, “This comprehensive solution would involve a mutually defined enrichment program with practical limits and transparency measures to ensure the peaceful nature of the program.”

However, Kerry insisted, “The first step, let me be clear, does not say that Iran has a right to enrich uranium.” Siding with Lavrov and Araqchi, Article IV of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty clearly states, “Nothing in this Treaty shall be interpreted as affecting the inalienable right of all the Parties to the Treaty to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes without discrimination …,” which would include the enrichment of uranium.

And the Jews? Don’t ask, it’s embarrassing how much noise they’re making, with their bizarre desire to stay alive:

Predictably, the Zionist entity’s Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, went into a convulsive fit over the Iran-U.S. deal, and, warning of disastrous consequences, fomented in furious tones that the agreement was “a historic mistake,” and has “not made the world a safer place.” However, even Netanyahu was forced to admit that the agreement actually did recognize Iran’s right to enrich uranium, as he himself bemoaned, “Now, for the first time, the international community has formally consented that Iran continue its enrichment of uranium.”

In other words, Weiler is not contradicting the stress-ridden warnings of the Israeli PM, he’s confirming them and is delighted in the achievement of his new home country.

White House: Israel’s All-or-Nothing Proposal on Iran Means War

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Israel’s proposal that Iran totally dismantle its nuclear capacity in exchange for sanctions relief would likely lead to war, a top White House official said.

The official, in a conference call Wednesday with think tanks and advocacy groups sympathetic to the Obama administration’s Iran strategy, outlined the proposal that the major powers will put to Iran at a third round of negotiations in Geneva beginning Thursday.

JTA obtained a recording of the call on condition that it not name the participants or fully quote them.

A think tank participant on the call said Israel’s posture — demanding a total halt to enrichment and the dismantling of all of Iran’s centrifuges — was a path to war.

Agreeing that such reasoning was “sound,” the White House official said that given a choice between “total capitulation” and advancing toward a nuclear weapon, Iran would choose the weapon.

That posture would “close the door on diplomacy” and would “essentially lead to war,” the official said.

The official sounded notes of frustration with Israel’s pushback against the U.S. proposal for a “first step” deal that would exchange some sanctions relief for some rollback of Iran’s nuclear program, saying it would provide Israel with a six-month window to influence the shape of a final deal.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, backed by a number of U.S. lawmakers, wants Iran to totally dismantle its nuclear program and abide by United Nations Security Council resolutions and suspend all its uranium enrichment.

The proposed deal outlined by the official would suspend uranium enrichment for six months at 20 percent, implying that Iran would be able to continue enrichment at 3.5 percent to 5 percent; “address” Iran’s existing stockpiles of 20 percent- and 5 percent-enriched uranium; suspend the development of a heavy water reactor that could produce plutonium; and end the installation and construction of new centrifuges.

The official emphasized that the construction — not just the installation — of new centrifuges would be halted, countering arguments by opponents of an interim deal who say it would buy Iran time to advance its weapons program.

All of this would be verified by intrusive inspections, the official said.

In exchange, the Western powers would release a “fraction” of $100 billion in Iranian frozen funds and end “ancillary” sanctions — the official did not identify them — but keep in place sanctions on Iran’s energy and banking sectors.

The official said the administration was confident that a proposal by a group of Republican senators to attach an amendment adding intensified Iran sanctions to a must-pass defense-funding act would likely not reach the floor of the Democrat-led Senate.

The senators, led by Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.), agree with Netanyahu’s assessment that intensified sanctions at this stage would extract from Iran an agreement to suspend enrichment and dismantle centrifuges.

The White House official said that intensified sanctions would likely not only drive Iran away from the talks but would collapse the international sanctions regime in place by alienating a number of countries now abiding by it.

Netanyahu Urges Kerry to Reject Deal with Iran

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu urged the United States to reject a deal which, according to reports, would ease sanctions on Iran if it limits uranium enrichment to 3.5 percent purity.

Netanyahu said Israel “utterly rejects” the deal and is not obliged to abide by it.

“Israel is not obliged by this agreement and will do everything it needs to defend itself, to defend the security of its people,” he said prior to a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Kerry announced last minute that he would fly to Geneva from Israel, where he is attempting to salvage Israel-Palestinian talks, in a bid to “narrow the difference in negotiations” between the major powers and Iran.

The deal would mean that Iran would stop enriching uranium to the 20 percent level that is close to weapons-grade and turn its existing stockpile of this material into harmless oxide but continue to enrich to 3.5 percent purity needed for nuclear power stations, according to a report Thursday in The Telegraph.

An agreement on what is being called a first-step deal is expected by Friday, when the current round of negotiations in Geneva between the major powers and Iran is scheduled to end.

Under the reported Western proposal, Iran would receive limited sanctions relief in exchange for an agreement to curtail nuclear enrichment activities.

Netanyahu said in a statement Friday that he told Kerry during a meeting in Israel that day that “no deal is better than a bad one” ahead of Kerry’s departure from Israeli to Geneva, Switzerland, where the United States, Britain, France, China and Russia and Germany are negotiating with Iran.

“The deal being discussed in Geneva is a bad one, a very bad deal,” Netanyahu said. Under the deal “Iran is not required to dismantle even a single centrifuge, yet the international community is easing sanctions for the first time in many years. Iran is getting everything it wanted at this stage but is giving nothing in return at a time when it is under heavy pressure,” Netanyahu added.

“I call on Secretary Kerry not to rush and sign but wait and re-evaluate to get a better deal,” Netanyahu also said.

An unnamed U.S. Senate aide, citing briefings from the White House, the State Department and sources in Geneva, told the Telegraph that in addition to the 3.5-percent limit, Iran would agree to limit the number of centrifuges being used for this purpose.

Iran would also agree not to use its more advanced IR-2 centrifuges, which can enrich uranium between three and five times faster than the older model, but would be under no requirement to remove or disable any other centrifuges.

Additionally, under the deal Iran would agree for a six-month freeze in some activities at its plutonium reactor at Arak, which could provide another route to a nuclear weapons-capability. Iran may, however, continue working on the facility.

Obama, Netanyahu Speak on Iran, Peace Talks

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

President Obama spoke with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu about Iran and the Israeli-Palestinian talks.

President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu spoke by phone today as part of their regular consultations,” said the statement. “The two leaders discussed recent developments related to Iran, Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, and other regional issues. The two leaders agreed to continue their close coordination on a range of security issues.”

Netanyahu on Sunday had mocked a proposal that would allow Iran to retain a capacity for low-level uranium enrichment as part of a deal to end sanctions that have crippled that country.

He did not say this was an American proposal, but he placed his derision of the proposal in the context of his talks last week with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Kerry, Netanyahu to Meet in Rome

Saturday, October 19th, 2013

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will meet in Rome with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to discuss talks with the Palestinians and Iran.

Kerry will meet Oct. 23 with Netanyahu to “discuss ongoing final status negotiations with the Palestinians, along with Iran, Syria, and other issues of mutual concern,” the State Department said Thursday.

Kerry is urging Israelis and the Palestinians to advance to core issues in their talks, including borders, Jerusalem and the status of the descendants of Palestinian refugees.

Netanyahu will be in Rome for his first meeting with Pope Francis, who has expressed an interest in visiting the Holy Land.

Netanyahu at the General Assembly

Sunday, October 13th, 2013

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai gives his analysis and then presents Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to the United Nations General Assembly.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/tv/radio/netanyahu-at-the-general-assembly/2013/10/13/

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