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November 27, 2015 / 15 Kislev, 5776
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Posts Tagged ‘drugs’

Netanyahu Meth Metaphor Focuses Debate on Inspections as AIPAC and J Street Battle It Out

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

(JNi.media) As President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu were fighting for media attention over the Iran deal on Wednesday, one statement by Netanyahu seemed to cut through the verbiage. Criticizing the 24-day notice inspectors would have to give before entering to inspect Iran’s nuclear sites, Netanyahu told NBC’s Lester Holt:

“You don’t have inspections within 24 hours—you have 24 days before you can inspect any site that you find suspicious in Iran. 24 days. Can you imagine giving a drug dealer 24 days’ notice before you check the premises? That’s a lot of time to flush a lot of meth down the toilet.”

Besides revealing that he is probably a fan of the series “Breaking Bad,” Netanyahu also put his finger on the very essence of the deal’s faults, putting into simple words the deep mistrust many have felt regarding the efforts of the 5+1 negotiators to present it as comprising a reliable concession on the part of the Islamic Republic.

The image of Iranian scientists flushing down their yellowcake while IAEA cops are waiting outside could easily go as viral as the poster of an ACME style bomb Netanyahu presented in his UN speech last year. And the 3-week wait period before inspections will undoubtedly become a central talking point for critics of the deal, inside and outside Congress.

AIPAC, which on Wednesday finally took a stand urging the defeat of the deal, and risking its relationship with the White House for a long time to come, ran the quality of inspections as two of its top talking point:

“The proposed deal does not ensure “anytime, anywhere” short-notice inspections.

“The proposed deal would disconnect and store centrifuges in an easily reversible manner, but it requires no dismantling of centrifuges or any Iranian nuclear facility.”

In defending the White House’s position to its followers, J Street’s Iran Deal Facts, while warning against “powerful forces” that “have lined up in opposition; not just fighting against this deal, but against any realistic option with Iran short of all-out war,” also centers on the issue of reliable inspections.

On its website, the group announces:

“Opponents of this agreement say Iran will cheat their way to a nuclear weapon — Not without us knowing in time to stop them. That’s why this deal is so important: by subjecting Iran to the most intrusive inspections regime in history, it leaves nothing to trust.”

And, the J Street promise is:

“Inspections at all nuclear sites. 24/7/365 monitoring. Tracking every ounce of uranium. It all adds up to unprecedented assurance that Iran cannot cheat their way to a weapon undetected.”

How does that statement sit with the Netanyahu meth inspection metaphor? J Street does not answer directly, but links to three outside sources, all of which agree with Netanyahu that unannounced inspections are not included in the deal, explaining why that’s not a bad thing.

J Street links an article titled “Inspecting Iran anywhere, but not anytime,” by Mark Fitzpatrick, of the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

You should read the entire article, whose gist is that it’s unreasonable to expect that Iran would allow undeterred, continuous access to its facilities. “As much as one might aspire also to seeing ‘anytime, anywhere’ inspections in Iran, unconditional demands are unrealistic,” Fitzpatrick writes.

If you read the entire piece, which is an apologia for the White House and for Iran’s nuclear ambitions (“No sovereign country, especially one under the repeated threat of airstrikes, would willingly expose its defenses.”), you’ll get to the final paragraph, which would have made a great SNL sketch:

“Iran has suggested that the IAEA could be allowed to take environmental samples near the desired location, while not being permitted to actually go to the location. This may be Iran’s alternative to an IAEA request for base access. Sampling close enough to the facility in question may allow officials to determine whether any activity took place using nuclear materials.”

It’s like taking soil samples from under the meth makers’ caravan…

Egypt Security Forces Kill 2 Smugglers at Israel’s Southern Border

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Egyptian security forces opened fire Tuesday morning and killed two cross-border smugglers who apparently tried to bring “illegal goods” into Israel, security sources said.

According to Channel 10, which quoted an IDF source, bags of illegal drugs were found near the scene where smugglers crossing the border from Egypt were met by a second set of smugglers on the Israeli side.

It is not clear which smugglers were hit by the Egyptian gunfire, nor have the identities of any of the smugglers been made clear.

IDF soldiers reportedly fired warning shots after hearing the gunfire near the border town of Nitzana, and are investigating reports of smugglers being wounded in the shootout with Egyptian security personnel.

IDF soldiers have also recovered the bodies of the two dead smugglers. An investigation into the incident is underway.

Despite numerous efforts to plug the holes in the Israel’s long Sinai border with Egypt, incidents like this are not uncommon.

Of more concern to the security establishments in both nations are the efforts of regional terrorist proxies for Iran and now Daesh (Islamic State in Iraq and Syria) to move weapons, ammunition, money and operatives themselves) across the border as well.

Former DC Mayor Marion Barry, Dead at 78

Sunday, November 23rd, 2014


Former Washington DC mayor Marion Barry, age 78, is dead.

The former mayor of the American capital city collapsed outside his home shortly after midnight Saturday night and was rushed to United Medical Center. He had been at Howard University Hospital earlier in the day.

The former mayor was in his third term after years of being investigated by federal agents when he was finally caught in 1990 by the FBI in the act of lighting a crack pipe one night in a downtown Washington hotel room.

He was subsequently arrested but a deadlocked jury found him guilty on only a single count of drug possession, and sentenced to six months in federal prison.

Barry returned to serve on the DC city council in 1992 and two years later again became mayor for a fourth and final term, after which he returned for repeated terms on the city council.




Holy Crisis Intervention From Beyond the Grave

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

A dynamic young man who left this world much earlier than anyone ever expected, still managed to reach from beyond the grave this week to help a fellow Jew.

David Antar, 26, was the youngest son in a Brooklyn-based Syrian Jewish family and least likely to be sick; but he passed away nearly a year ago. Heartbroken family and friends told the story of his life in the few words they could place on the stone cover for his grave.

“Humanitarian. He helped hundreds of people in their time of need… He lived a very short life spent in the service of others.”

There is a tradition among Jews to visit the resting place of departed loved ones during the ten “days of repentance” between Rosh HaShanah (Jewish New Year) and Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement).

In a Sephardic cemetery in Staten Island, New York, Eliot and Shlomit Belilos were visiting the graves of family members on Thursday when they suddenly remembered their friend David had also come to the cemetery this year.

Walking over to pay their respects, they spotted a group of nine men close to Antar’s grave who looked like they were searching for something, Shlomit Belilos related in an interview with JewishPress.com .

“Can we help you?” she asked the group.

“We need a tenth man,” one of the group replied, “and we’re running out of time. We need to say Kaddish (the Jewish prayer for the dead) for a relative here but it is getting late.”

The requirements for reciting Kaddish are specific, and unique. A quorum of ten Jewish males age 13 and up is required. Kaddish cannot be recited without these specific conditions having been met. In the loss of a parent, for the first 11 months the prayer is recited by the bereaved child three times a day, every day, supported by the quorum of ten. In other circumstances the requirements change.

Eliot Belilos had appeared just in time, and more to the point, he was sadly eligible, having lost his father just a couple of years ago. Being familiar with the need for recitation of the Kaddish, he quickly joined the group and Kaddish was recited.

Those in the quorum merited a ‘credit’ for having helped out a fellow Jew and the bereaved merited a credit for having met his obligation to recite Kaddish as he was supposed to. Belilos scored an extra credit for being the tenth man to complete the minyan (quorum).

Coincidence? Yes, of course. But David Antar always had a knack for being in the right place at the right time when something needed to get done fast. Now.

Antar was a drug counselor, a case manager and a crisis intervention specialist. He founded and ran an agency, “C.R.I. Out” in Los Angeles, California, that helped place drug addicts in treatment programs.

He knew what worked and what didn’t, first-hand, because he had already been there — like most really good drug counselors — trying to bury old business he’d spent a lifetime trying to forget. He knew the struggle from “working the program one day at a time,” every day.

On October 28, 2013, Antar didn’t work the program. No one knows why. It cost him his life, but not his soul. That part of him still burns brightly.

On September 3, 2014, somehow David Antar reached out and made sure Kaddish was said for a fellow Jew.

May the memories of all departed loved ones be for a blessing this Yom Kippur Sabbath.

Bullet-Filled Doll Halts Traffic at Ben Gurion Airport

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Ben Gurion Airport officials foiled an attempt to smuggle drugs and bullets on a plane to Uzbekistan around noon Monday.

Flights were delayed until officials were certain there was no more contraband on the flight that was scheduled to take off at 14:00.

Inspectors discovered a cartridge of bullets in a toy in a suitcase carried by a 36-year-old man from central Israel. Surprised at the evidence, he ran away and shortly after was apprehended. He told investigators that a woman asked him to take the paclage because he already had several pieces of luggage.

The man later identified the woman, a citizen of Uzbekistan, and a further examination of her luggage revealed toy dolls stuffed with bullets and drugs.

Official checked out the entire plane to make sure there were no other drugs and ammunition on boards.

Hamas Terrorists were on Psychoactive Drugs

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

An IDF officer reported that a number of Hamas terrorists in Gaza were hyped up on psychoactive drugs, according to a report on Rotter.net.

Soldiers noticed that some of the Hamas terrorists they captured in Gaza were acting very “weird”.

Examinations indicated that they had been given drugs to make them “not afraid” to fight the IDF.

The report claims that a side effect of the drug is that it made it easier for the IDF to interrogate them.

In the beginning of Operation Protective Edge, it was reported a number of times that Hamas terrorists ran away as soon as the IDF approached.

The Hamas leadership may have given their fighters the drugs to stop that rational behavior.

Israel Police Report 9% Rise in Calls for Help

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

It’s going to be another long, hot summer for security personnel if the latest statistics are accurate.

Israel Police report they received more than nine million ‘100′ calls (Israel’s ‘911′) from Tel Aviv in 2013 — a nine percent rise over the previous year.

Annual police data showed the heaviest rate of calls came in the summer months, in June, July and August.

Of the 9,208,890 calls received by the national Israel Police dispatcher, 40,868 took place at one o’clock in the morning, an hour when many bars close. Only 3,731 crimes were reported between 5 am and 6 am – in that grey hour before dawn.

In 2012, 359,503 complaints went on to be processed by police and nearly one third of those — 89,580 — were for disturbing the peace.

Figures show that 40 percent of the calls originated from the southern and central regional districts. But 18 percent came solely from the city of Tel Aviv; not far behind, 14 percent originated in Jerusalem.

Car theft accounted for 55 percent of nearly 20,000 calls to police.

In addition, police reported that some 2,553 kilograms of hashish were seized during the year as well as 1,171 kilos of marijuana and 47,316 tablets of methamphetamine.

In 2012, there were 19, 352 arrests for drug use, 4,448 arrests for drug trafficking and 2,972 arrests for possession of drugs “not for personal use.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israel-police-report-9-rise-in-calls-for-help/2014/05/14/

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