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August 31, 2015 / 16 Elul, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Honenu’

Israeli Police Illegal Arrest and Interrogation Fail to Pin Firebombing on 13- and 12-Year-Old Jewish Boys (Video)

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Those of us who live in democratic societies have grown to see the limits placed on our naturally exuberant police forces as essential components of our civil freedoms. We know a person may not be interrogated without his or her attorney being present. We know a person must be arraigned and charged with a crime, or be set free. We know a minor may not be interrogated without his or her parent present.

Not in the wild-west territory of Judea and Samaria, where police is more likely to be brutal than not, especially to Jewish “settlers” (Hebrew for Pariah) and definitely not regarding Jewish boys of bar mitzvah age and younger.

Every week, it seems, we are treated to new evidence of Israel’s security forces in the “territories” appearing to merge with the Arab regime police forces all around us, employing brute force, intimidation, illegal incarceration and the occasional physical torture, because, frankly, they’ve run out of other ways to solve crimes.

A case in point is the recent testimony of two young teens, one 12, the other 13, who testified on video which was published by HaKol HaYehudi (The Jewish Voice).

At the end of last week, three young teens from Bat Ayin were released after spending six days in prison on suspicion of firebombing an Arab taxi, injuring six Arabs.

All three children withstood extremely difficult conditions and especially long interrogations, accompanied with threats and sophisticated tactics, utilizing relentless psychological pressure.

13-year-old M. told HaKol HaYehudi about the investigation methods employed by the Police Central Unit (Yamar) and the General Security Service (Shabak).

M. and his friends were on their way to Jerusalem Sunday morning, last week.

“At the Gush intersection (a hitchhiking post), a car stopped to give us a ride to Jerusalem. Two of us got in; the third boy wanted to get in too, but the driver said that he would only agree to take two. The driver and his wife started talking to us about ‘Price Tag’ (the clandestine retaliation movement against the left-wing and Arabs) and whether it was a good thing or not,” M. related.

“The driver turned on the radio and it was someone talking about ‘Price Tags’  and that we have to burn down mosques during the day, with the Arabs still inside, and that he tried to join the Price Tag movement and they wouldn’t agree with him. It seemed very strange, but we didn’t understand what was going on,“ M. described.

“When the radio piece was over, the driver started asking us who threw the firebomb, and that of course we knew who it is.” M. answered that he and his friend had no idea who did it.

The two children still didn’t realize that the innocent “hitch” was a actually a police trap.

“We reached Kiryat Moshe and asked to get out, but the driver said that he would pull over for us at a stop further down the road. When we got to that stop, the driver said that it’s illegal to stop at the bus stop and there’s an increased fine for it, so he would stop after the next turn. He stopped after the turn and two detectives immediately jumped on us and told us that we were under arrest for suspicion of conspiracy to commit a crime.”

After several days under arrest, M. was led near the interrogation room when he suddenly heard loud shouts.

“I saw the driver of the car that we hitchhiked in, handcuffed inside the interrogation room, with a detective shouting at him, ‘what did you talk about with them during the ride?  We already know everything about you!’ and stuff like that. I heard him tell the detective that he knows me only because he picked me up one day at the Gush intersection and that he has no connection to us.”

“After that, I was put into a holding cell and suddenly they put him in too. He started shouting at me: ‘What did you do? I am a married man and I don’t want to get involved in problems.’”

The investigating police officer then started to shout at M. that he and his friends must tell the detectives what they did in order to get the man released to his family.

“I didn’t really pay attention to him, so they took him out and I didn’t see him again,” said M.

Remaining Bat Ayin Boys Released

Friday, August 31st, 2012

The remaining two Bat Ayin children, ages 12 and 13, accused of firebombing an Arab taxi were released from police custody on Friday morning without charges. They will remain under house arrest for one additional week.

The third child, age 12, who was released without any additional conditions a few days ago reported that the police treated them very poorly. They were hardly given any food their first day in jail and the interrogations lasted for hours during which they were screamed and yelled at.

Honenu, the Israeli legal rights organization reports that police denied the minors their basic civil rights on a number of occasions, including being denied access to their lawyer and the presence of an additional adult during interrogation, as required by law when minors are involved.

Initially the police denied the children access to a lawyer, until the Honenu lawyer brought his request to court, and the police were forced to comply with the law.

 

 

So Far, One Bat Ayin Minor Released in Firebomb Investigation

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

So far, one of the Bat Ayin minors, ages 12-13, arrested in suspicion of throwing the firebomb on the Arab taxi has been released.

The Legal Rights organization Honenu reports that the police have not allowed the two other children, still being detained, to talk with lawyers.

They furthermore claim that the police are not following proper procedure in investigating the case including the investigation of their alibis. And to add to that, one of the victims has stated publicly that their attacker was an adult in his twenties, while a second victim made it very clear that it could not have been 12-13 year old children that threw the firebomb.

Jerusalem Protest Detainees Released

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

The four detainees from Wednesday’s protest in front of the Knesset in Jerusalem have been unconditionally released at the police station, Honenu reports.

Following a Knesset vote on the “Regulation Law” intended to prevent the evacuation of the Ulpana Neighborhood in Beit El, Ulpana residents and others supporting the law broke up in angry protest.

During the protest MK Michael Ben-Ari of the National Union party reported to Honenu that his parliamentary aide, right-wing activist Itamar Ben-Gvir, had been detained (not arrested, as previously reported) for objecting to the use of mounted police, whom he said endangered the lives of the protesters.

Two minors, one suspected of cursing a policeman and the other of pushing a policeman, were also detained. An additional adult was detained on suspicion of disturbing a policeman in the line of duty.

After several hours of interrogation at the Moriah Police Station, the four detainees were unconditionally released at the station.

Honenu attorney Adi Kedar handled the case.

MK Ben-Ari, whose faction’s proposed bill had just been defeated by a 3-1 margin, was offering carrots to all the “bunnies” among the coalition ministers, who promised their support to the bill but, under threat of dismissal from Netanyahu’s government, remained absent during the vote.

The bunny, or “shafan” in Hebrew, is the paradigm of cowardice in Israeli culture.

After Altercation with an Arab, Jewish Students Arrested by Jerusalem Arab Police

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Five yeshiva high school students from Jerusalem were detained Sunday, after an altercation had broken out between them and an Arab at “HaKotel HaKatan” (“the small wall”), a section of the retaining wall surrounding the Temple Mount near the Western Wall, Honenu reports. The students were held in remand until the middle of the night and then released on condition of a restraining order banning them from entering the Old City of Jerusalem for 15 days.

The group, accompanied by one of their rabbis, arrived at HaKotel HaKatan Sunday at dusk and began the Shavuot afternoon prayers. An Arab man accompanied by two Arab women passed by them. The Arabs spoke loudly, laughed and disturbed the prayers.

In response to a request by the praying students to lower their voices, the Arab man began to shout, curse and disturb the prayers even more. An altercation developed after several of the students attempted to remove the disruptive Arab from the scene, and he pulled off his belt to attack them.

Arab policemen from the Old City of Jerusalem arrived, and the disruptive Arab pointed at several of the students who, according to him, had attacked him. As a result, the policemen detained them.

According the students, the Arab arbitrarily pointed at some of them as responsible for the altercation.

One of the detained students told Honenu that the Arab policemen did not inform them that they were being arrested, but instead only requested that they come with them to the police station in order to clarify the details of the incident. They were told they could review, along with police, video taken by a security camera at the scene.

In the end, they were not shown the video.

At the police station, the students, all minors, were detained for interrogation. They remained there until the middle of the night.

The law requires that the parents of a minor be informed of their child’s arrest and that a parent or other adult be present during the interrogation of a minor. But the parents of two of the detained students claim that they were not informed of the arrest. The parents of another student received an announcement only at 1:30 in the morning, even though their son had been detained since about 7:30 PM.

Honenu attorney Adi Kedar was called to represent the detainees.

The detainees told Honenu that police refused their request for grape juice in order to say the havdala blessing at the end of Shabbat, and therefore during their entire stay at the police station they could not eat or drink.

(According to Jewish law, one must first say the havdala blessing, customarily over wine or grape juice, before being allowed to eat or drink.)

After several hours of interrogation, the students were released on condition of a restraining order banning them for 15 days from the Old City of Jerusalem.

The parents of one of the detained students told Honenu that their son had not been at the scene at the time of the incident, arriving only after hearing about the altercation.

“Why didn’t the police examine the film from the security camera, as they should have before opening a criminal file on my son?” asked the father of one of the students.

According to him, received a call at 1:30 AM, from an unlisted number, which he missed and was then unable to call back.

The parents intend to file a complaint on the conduct of the police, including the violation of their son’s rights as a minor.

Chabad Emissary Held at Ben-Gurion; Police Crack Down on ‘Right Wing Publication’

Friday, May 11th, 2012

Rabbi Hanan Herbst, a Chabad emissary and resident of Ma’ale Levona in the Binyamin region who returned with his wife and children Thursday morning from half a year of outreach work in India, was arrested at Ben-Gurion airport in Lod. After negotiations between the police and a Honenu attorney the emissary was released.

Honenu is a not-for-profit legal aid organization

According to Honenu’s report, Hanan Herbst and his family spent the past six months operating a Chabad House – teaching and also running a kosher restaurant for the benefit of Jews traveling in the area, the city of Dharamsala, India, a spiritual and mystical center which attracts a large number of travelers from all over the world, among them many Jews.

On Thursday morning, the family landed at the Ben-Gurion airport where an unpleasant surprise awaited them. Airport police informed Harbest that the National Unit for Serious and International Crime Investigations had declared him “wanted for an interrogation” which is why he was being detained. After a short discussion, Herbst learned that the investigation concerned the publication of articles supposedly calling for violence, in “HaKol HaYehudi” (“The Jewish Voice”) more than a year ago.

“HaKol HaYehudi” is a right wing publication focusing on providing an alternative to Israel’s mainstream media for news and opinion. The publication has been under widespread investigation for about a year, including raids on its offices, confiscation of equipment and arrests of staff members.

Last week, two Yitzhar residents were summoned to the offices of the National Unit for Serious and International Crime Investigations for an interrogation concerning the publication of articles in “HaKol HaYehudi” which supposedly incited to violence.

In negotiations with Honenu attorney Adi Kedar the National Unit for Serious and International Crime Investigations agreed that Herbst would report of his own volition to an interrogation this coming Sunday and that he and his family would be free to return home.

Back in 2006, Hanan Herbst was among 19 Jews from various outposts in the Yitzhar area of Samaria who received administrative orders over the Sukkot holiday ordering them to leave their homes, and in some cases all of Judea and Samaria, for periods ranging from three months to a year.

Previous charges against the 19 were quite minor, ranging from blocking traffic in protest of government policy to preventing a police officer from carrying out his duty. But the GSS at the time was said to have provided secret information about the 19 harboring “secret, violent plans against Arabs or Arab property.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/chabad-emissary-detained-at-ben-gurion-as-part-of-police-crackdown-on-right-wing-publication/2012/05/11/

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