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December 20, 2014 / 28 Kislev, 5775
 
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Posts Tagged ‘the Middle East’

Bizzaro Chanukah: Heavily Armed Jews Defeated by a Few Rock Slinging Goyim (Video)

Sunday, December 9th, 2012

Who is subjecting our men and women in uniform to this kind of humiliation?

Under the triumvirate of Prime Minister Netanyahu, Defense Minister Barak, and Foreign Minister Liberman, the IDF has lost all semblance of deterrence. It has evaporated in Gaza, where on Friday the leader of the terrorist state of Hamas, Khalid Mashaal, was able to stand in broad daylight and proclaim his right to Jerusalem, Haifa and Jaffa, and no rocket came down on him from the sky. And it is gone in Judea and Samaria, where the local youth gangs have lost all fear of the IDF.

Just watch the two videos below. You’ll see, from two different angles, how an IDF squad, armed to the teeth and carrying riot gear, chases after Arab hooligans in the village of Yamun, west of Jenin. At some point, the crowd turns around and starts pelting the soldiers with rocks.

And the soldiers ran.

Because if our soldiers dared defend themselves, in front of the cameras, they would be court martialed that same afternoon and be imprisoned, demoted, dishonorably discharged, you name it.

This is why they’re running.

What’s the point of sending them out there in the first place?

Watch the videos. They tell a tale of loss. The strongest army in the Middle East has been defeated by its commanders and the politicians who appoint their commanders.

Watch, and be certain – the weaker Israel appears to the Arabs, the greater the chances that the third Intifada is already brewing, already around the corner. God forbid, we’re entering a very dark winter in which our enemies have become stronger and we have discovered a myriad innovative ways of sabotaging our own military.

Watch the video and start preparing for bad news.



 

Yishai and Malkah on Operation Pillar of Cloud

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

War in the Middle East has been front and Yishai and Malkah begin by discussing Operation Pillar of Cloud, the ongoing conflict between Israel and Hamas, which has been continuing for almost a week. Yishai and Malkah talk about how Hamas has both a media and military agenda such as how images from completely different and unrelated events have been used to attempt to coerce the world into making the world feel sorry for their cause. They move on at 16:00 to talk specifically about rockets striking Israeli civilians and end the segment by Yishai giving a strategic analysis of the current situation.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
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Egyptian Foreign Minister: Israel Mast Stop Bombing Gaza Immediately

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Amid rumors that Egypt is planning to send home the Israeli ambassador to Cairo, Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohamed Amr issued a statement Wednesday evening, condemning the Israeli air strikes in Gaza and demanding the strikes to end immediately, according to Al Ahram.

This has been the first official Egyptian response to the assassination of Hamas military chief of staff Ahmed al-Jaabari, Amr said the Israeli military escalation in Gaza occurs “at a very critical time in the Middle East.”

The Egyptian FM warned Israel of the negative impact on the stability of the Middle East if the Israeli air strikes do not stop.

Maker of Anti-Muslim Film Gets a Year in Prison

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

The Californian who produced the anti-Muslim film which led to anti-American violence throughout the Middle East was sentenced Wednesday to a year in federal prison, not for crimes against Islam, but for violating the terms of his probation, AP reports.

In a plea bargain between Mark Basseley Youssef and federal prosecutors, Youssef admitted in open court that he had used a number of false names, in direct violation of his probation order, including obtaining a driver’s license under a false name.

Youssef was on probation for a bank fraud case.

Youssef’s attorney, Steven Seiden, later told reporters outside the court house that he had a message for them from his client.

“The one thing he wanted me to tell all of you is President Obama may have gotten Osama bin Laden, but he didn’t kill the ideology,” Seiden said.

Asked to elaborate, the attorney said, “I didn’t ask him, and I don’t know.”

All the parties to the plea deal agreed that the violations had nothing to do with “Innocence of Muslims,” Youssef’s film that depicts Mohammad as a religious fraud, pedophile and womanizer.

But, of course, everybody also knew that, had Youssef not produced that idiotic film, he would have been allowed to go on with his grifter’s life at least until he got caught stealing something serious again.

Still, according to AP, Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Dugdale argued that Youssef’s lies about his identity have caused harm to others, including the film’s cast and crew, who found themselves in the midst of an apparent plot to spread deadly violence to many parts of the Middle East.

“They had no idea he was a recently released felon,” Dugdale said. “Had they known that, they might have had second thoughts” about doing the film.

Dugdale said members of the crew had received death threats, and they fear their careers are ruined.

Youssef, 55, was arrested in late September, just weeks after he went into hiding when the deadly violence erupted.

A Pakistani cabinet minister even offering $100,000 to anyone who kills Youssef. This might force the federal prison authorities to take special measures in protecting him.

The Future of America in the Middle East

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

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Yishai presents a recent broadcast from the BBC about how the United States fits into the Middle East and also how the upcoming American elections can affect Middle Eastern policy, especially in regards to Israel.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Tevye in the Promised Land, Chapter Eighteen: Peace in the Middle East

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

The emergency bell clanged throughout the valley of the Shoshana kibbutz. Workers who were building the first stone edifice on the settlement put down their chisels and masonry tools. Field hands set aside their scythes and their sickles and started back toward the compound of mud and wood dwellings. Within minutes, all of the settlers sat crowded together on the benches in the dining hall. With great indignation, Ben Zion related how the Arabs had ambushed them at the well and stolen his horse and two rifles. He demanded that a small force be organized immediately and set off in retaliation.

“Why didn’t you shoot?” someone asked.

“We were outnumbered, and I did not want to endanger the girl,” he answered, leaving out the embarrassing details of how the Arabs had snuck up and surprised them.

“You know the rule that a shomer is forbidden to go out on guard duty alone. Why did you break it?”

“I was teaching the girl how to shoot.”

“I wish he would teach me how to shoot,” a plain-looking girl quipped loudly enough for her neighbors to hear. Other girls giggled. Ben Zion’s friends broke out in laughter. Since it was Gordon’s turn to preside at the general meeting, the gavel was in his hand. He gave it a bang on the table, and the ruckus subsided. Sonia, standing in a corner of the hall, flashed a look of accusation at the faithless Don Juan. Ben Zion smiled. Rogue that he was, he cherished all of the attention.

“No one wants a war,” Perchik said. “Let the Arabs have the well. We can always dig another.”

Immediately, another clamor broke out in the crowd. Shouts of protest or agreement came from all corners of the hall. Once again, the fierce-looking Gordon wielded his gavel.

“Water can’t be found everywhere,” a kibbutznik asserted. “Without our wells, what will we do in the event of a drought?”

“What about the stolen horse and the rifles?” another man asked. “Do we give them away too?”

The uproar resumed. This time it took a full minute of gavel banging to restore a semblance of order.

“I volunteer to lead a contingent from the kibbutz to enter into negotiation with the Arabs,” Perchik announced. “If nothing can be accomplished in a peaceful manner, then we can think about fighting.”

“If we don’t respond with a show of force, they will only take advantage of us in the future,” Ben Zion warned.

Once again, a vote was taken. This time, Ben Zion’s followers were one vote shy of a deadlock. Peter had gone to Tiberias to have a doctor examine an infection in his wounded shoulder.

“That’s not fair,” Ben Zion protested. “Peter is not here to vote.”

“You know the rules of the voting,” Gordon responded. “A voter has to be present.”

Ben Zion cast a frustrated look over the crowd.

“One minute,” a voice called from the doorway. “You didn’t count me. I vote with Ben Zion.”

It was Bat Sheva.

“She doesn’t belong to the kibbutz,” Sonia called.

“I want to join,” Bat Sheva responded.

Tevye stood up from his seat on a bench in the back of the room and glared at his daughter. She stared defiantly back at him. Ben Zion’s frown immediately turned to a grin.

“The vote is even,” he said.

“No it isn’t!” Tevye bellowed. “I too want to join the kibbutz. And I vote with Perchik!”

It was no easy decision for Perchik. On the one hand, Tevye’s vote assured a majority for his non-violent faction, averting the danger of military encounter. On the other hand, if Tevye were actually to reside in Shoshana, that would be the end of Perchik’s happy home life with Hodel. But, then again, if Ben Zion’s forces won out, Perchik’s influence on the kibbutz would be seriously weakened. For Tevye also, siding with his socialist son-in-law was no easy matter, but he was willing to do it to bring about Ben Zion’s defeat.

“We have the majority,” Perchik claimed, accepting Tevye’s vote.

“The decision is final,” Gordon announced. “We negotiate with our neighbors.”

Another commotion erupted. Everyone had something to say, either about the Arabs, or about the way the kibbutz had accepted new members without a community vote. Bat Sheva glared at her father and strode out of the hall. Tevye started after her, but Perchik walked over and gave him a congratulatory pat on the back.

A Friendly Letter – a Glimmer of Hope

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Just when you think you have everything pretty much figured out in the Middle East, someone throws you a curve. At least that’s what happened to me last week.

In what has to be the most surprising development thus far in the so called Arab Spring – Egypt’s new freely elected President, Mohammed Morsi, has sent a friendly letter to Israeli President Shimon Peres on the occasion of the exchange of ambassadors. How friendly? From the Times of Israel:

The letter began by calling Peres a “great and good friend,” and went on to express a desire for “maintaining and strengthening the cordial relations which so happily exist between our two countries.” Morsi closed his letter, which largely followed standard diplomatic language for the exchange of ambassadors, by expressing “highest esteem and consideration

…In July, Peres’s office reported that it had received a friendly letter from Morsi in which the Egyptian leader expressed hopes for regional stability and “deep thanks” for Peres’s Ramadan good wishes. In that note, Morsi also said his country was committed to regional security and stability, including for the Israeli people.

This comes as quite a shock to me considering his political affiliation. He is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, a fanatical Islamist group who considers the existence of Israel an abomination – and an affront to their fundamentalist beliefs. Their views match those of Hamas and Hezbollah. I don’t think there can be much dispute about that.

In fact when the letter was first made public, it was followed by denials from Brotherhood officials – pretty much claiming it to be a fabrication.

But it wasn’t.

This is a good sign. Despite the overt hatred of the Jewish State among most Islamists which comprise organizations like the Brotherhood, Hamas and Hezbollah, it is clear that Egypt has no interest in hostilities between the two countries. Despite Mosri’s obviously deep religious beliefs, he seems to be a pragmatist interested in developing his country – making it a better place to live for his people. To that extent, he seems to have made the friendliest statement toward Israel I have ever heard from a Muslim leader – with the possible exception of Anwar Sadat.

Does this mean that Israel can put away their guns? Of course not. They need to maintain their military edge. I believe Morsi. Islamists say what they mean.They are not reticent about expressing their true feeling about us. That he did something that so obviously upsets his co-coreligionists means something in my view.

It isn’t that I think he now loves Israel unconditionally. Far from it. I do not doubt for a minute that if Mosri thought he could win a war with Israel militarily, he would not hesitate to attack. But as a pragmatist – the reason he wants to have friendly relations with Israel is he knows he can’t win a war with them. And it would be far too too costly in both Egyptian blood and treasure to try. Which is why it is important for Israel to maintain its military edge… and important for him to maintain a peace treaty.

This is good news. Can we trust him? I think so. He has not hesitated to state his own true feelings about Israel.

The recent violent protests at the American embassy there shows that there is still plenty of popular hostility there against the US – and most certainly Israel. Nonetheless, I think I can safely say that for now, Morsi is at least on the same page with Mubarak with respect to the Jewish state.

Hopefully the new regimes in other Arab countries will have the same approach – including in an eventual post Assad Syria. Perhaps that is too much to hope for, but at this point all hope is definitely not lost. If a member of the Muslim Brotherhood can say such good things to an Israel President perhaps there will be other fundamentalist leaders that will follow suit.

Perhaps we are finally seeing a new world order among Arabs who will focus their leaders on the welfare of their people instead of hatred of Israel. Is that too much to hope for? Maybe. But one can hope. That said the threat of terror from Israel’s terrorist neighbors is still very much alive and well. As far as the immediate big picture is concerned, not much has really changed.

How does this all this impact on my choice for President? I don’t know. I still have to think about who I will endorse in the upcoming election. At this point, I am going to wait for the final debate between the two candidates. It is supposed to focus on foreign policy. I will make my decision after that.

Nonetheless I am still very glad about to hear about this news. It gives me a glimmer of hope about the future. But only a glimmer.

Visit Emes Ve-Emunah.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/haemtza/a-friendly-letter-a-glimmer-of-hope/2012/10/22/

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