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August 28, 2016 / 24 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘charity’

Charity

Sunday, June 19th, 2016

An Israeli border police officer gives money to a Muslim woman on the second Friday prayers of Islam’s holy month of Ramadan, in Jerusalem’s Old city, June 17, 2016.

During the month of Ramadan, poor Muslim women sit along the streets of the Old City of Jerusalem, hoping to receive charity from their coreligionists.

Photo of the Day

Two Jewish Boys Help Blind Arab Man #OnlyInIsrael [video]

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Yesterday, two 15-year-old Jewish, kipa-wearing, boys were walking in Jerusalem when they heard a blind Arab man say he didn’t have enough money to buy his medicine.

The two took the blind man and sat him down on a bench with them and they began to play their guitars.

When they collected the 70 shekels the Arab man needed, one of the Jewish boys went to the pharmacy and bought the medicine for the man.

Afterwards, the man asked the boys if they could continue to play some more songs for him, which they did.

Source: The Two Shollies – Shtuyot

Video of the Day

Kimcha D’Pischa

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Volunteers from the “Leket Israel” charity organization and Israeli President’s residence workers, pack boxes with food for families in need ahead of the Jewish holiday of Passover, at the President’s residence in Jerusalem.

Photo of the Day

UK Chief Rabbi Urging Jews to Join War on Poverty

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

(JNi.media) Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis has come out in support of Pope Francis, endorsing 17 goals that will form the blueprint for the battle-plan against global poverty, climate change and inequality. Rabbi Mirvis is urging Jews to ask their MPs to sign up the UK to a set of commitments to end global poverty by 2030.

“Judaism sets out a vision of what the future will ultimately hold for humanity. Our sages teach us that we must work towards a world where there is universal justice, security and truth,” Rabbi Mirvis wrote in Jewish News Wednesday, “Yet, although we have countless references in our religious and Biblical discourse to a utopian, post-messianic era in which these objectives are realized, they also teach us that social justice is very much achievable now. Not at some distant point in the future that we might feel is out of reach – but today, in 2015.”

The chief rabbi reported how, “with remarkably little fanfare, world leaders met last week to adopt what are known as the ‘Sustainable Development Goals’. They are the successor to the ‘Millennium Development Goals’ agreed by the international community in the year 2000 and represent the most realistic and unified approach in human history to tackling global inequality, poverty, hunger and climate change, to name but a few of their priorities.”

“There is reason to be optimistic,” Rabbi Mirvis continued. “The world has lifted more than a billion people out of extreme poverty since 1990 and the proportion of undernourished people in the developing regions has fallen by almost half. But what would our ancestors have made of our progress?”

In the end, Rabbi Mirvis asked his readers to be inspired by American author H. Jackson Brown, Jr. who said, “Live so that when your children think of fairness, caring and integrity, they think of you.”

Tzedek—The Jewish community’s response to extreme poverty—chief executive Jude Williams said: “The Chief Rabbi highlights, as we do, that the globalization of our world brings with it a globalization of our responsibilities. With 1.1 billion people living on less than $1.25 a day, the SDGs are a global plan of action. The Jewish community should play its part.”

JNi.Media

UK Jews Buy Israeli Goods for Needy Brits

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Thousands of British Jews fought an anti-Israel boycott this week with a campaign that saw Israeli goods gifted to needy British families.

In a “Day of Action for Israel,” pro-Israel activists purchased Israeli-made goods from dozens of stores, and donated them to the needy.

“We achieved three goals: we pushed back against the boycott, we helped Israeli exports, and we gave the food to the homeless and to low-income families,” organizer Raffi Bloom told Maariv/nrg.

Bloom said the day of action was wildly successful, so much so that there are plans to make it an annual tradition.

Maayana Miskin

Swing That Chicken Over Your Head

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

A Hareidi man performs the Kaparos ceremony for his son, in Beitar.

The ritual, which some consider controversial, is performed before Yom Kippur, as part of the repentance process.

A chicken is gently raised and waved over the head of a family member or yourself.

The person performing the ritual says the following statement (or a variation of it if you are performing it for someone else):

This is my exchange, this is my substitute, this is my atonement. This [chicken/rooster/hen] will go to its death (Alternative text: This money will go to charity), while I will enter and proceed to a good long life and to peace.

After which, the chicken is shechted (kosher slaughter) and given to a poor person so their family will have chicken to eat before Yom Kippur.

For those that don’t like chickens, money can be substituted, which is then donated to the poor in place of the chicken.

The ritual is first mentioned in by Natronai ben Hilai, Gaon of the Academy of Sura in Babylonia, in 853 C.E

Their are many reasons modern people consider the ritual controversial:

1) Animal activists don’t like that chickens are slaughtered for food. 2) Animal activists don’t like that people wave chickens over their heads. 3) Animal activists don’t like the way the chickens are stored while waiting for the kaparos ceremony (a valid concern in some cases). 4) The process is done publicly, and most people have never been to a slaughterhouse. The concept that chickens were actually once alive before reaching the freezer section of the supermarket can be shocking to some. 5) There is a concern that the person may not hold the chicken properly and will injure it during the ritual. 6) It’s kind of icky to hold a live chicken, not to mention the associated risks of holding a bird over your head.

There are also religious authorities that consider the ritual controversial.

There are questions as to the origin of this ritual, and some (Ranban, Rashba) consider it a foreign, pagan practice that snuck (not sneaked) into Judaism. Rav Yosef Karo (Shulchan Aruch) also objected to it.

On the other side, there are other leading rabbis (and kabbalists) who do approve of it.

Whatever your stance, for many Jews its simply a long-loved tradition they aren’t about to give up or change. .

Photo of the Day

Rami Levy Quietly Helping Families of the Fallen

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

Without almost anyone noticing, supermarket magnate Rami Levy has been quietly unloading truckloads of food and basics at the homes of all the fallen soldiers since the beginning of Operation Protective Edge, according to Guy Meroz of Channel 10.

Rami Levy has a history of quietly supporting families of the fallen.

In 2011, Rami Levy took it upon himself to provide food and basics for the surviving children of the Fogel family of Itamar, until the youngest orphan becomes an adult. It only became public knowledge after Levy was spotted in the kitchen of the massacred Fogel family, personally stocking their fridge and cabinets.

Ramy Levy’s Shivuk HaShikma supermarket chain opened 30 years ago, and has 27 stores and approximately 5000 employees. It’s named after the street in Machane Yehuda, the Jerusalem Shuk, where he opened his first grocery store in a stall he got from his grandfather.

Shalom Bear

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/rami-levy-quietly-helping-families-of-the-fallen/2014/07/29/

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