web analytics
February 11, 2016 / 2 Adar I, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘demographics’

Report: Arab Demographic Time Bomb Stopped Ticking

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

(JNi.media) Those learned books and articles urging “difficult” political choices by Israel based on the ever-present “ticking demographic time bomb” of a growing Arab population against a shrinking Jewish population should probably be scrapped. According to a Central Bureau of Statistics report offering selected data on the occasion of the International Child Day 2015, the difference in birth rates between the Jewish and Arab populations have declined significantly over the last decade.

Some 33% of Israel’s population are children under the age of 17. 41% of the Arab population are children, compared with about 31% of the Jewish population. The differences stem mainly from differences in fertility rates. Until the early 2000s, the average number of children a woman was expected to have during her lifetime was approximately 4.3 per Arab woman and 2.6 for a Jewish woman. These differences have declined significantly over the last decade. In 2014, the total fertility rate of an Arab woman was 3.17 children in her lifetime, compared with 3.11 for Jewish women. This marks a 26% decline in Arab births, and a 20% increase in Jewish births.

Incidentally, the fertility rate in France is 2.01 per woman. In Norway it is 1.9.

Among cities with 100,000 or more residents, B’nei B’rak is the youngest, with 47% children, and Tel Aviv the oldest — only 21% children.

At the end of 2014 there were 2.74 million Israeli children ages 0 – 17, constituting 33% of the overall population. 1.945 million of them were Jewish (71.0%), 713,000 Arabs (26.0%) and 82,000 (3.0%) were classified as “others.”

About 97% of Jewish children were born in Israel, and about 78% of them were born to fathers who were also born in Israel.

Most children in Israel live with two parents (about 92%). About 212,000 children (8%) live with only one parent. Most of the children who live in one-parent families live with their mother (93%).

Here’s a loaded statistic: percentage of TV ownership or cable or satellite TV subscription is lower in households with children than without. Also, the more children there are in the household, the lower the percentage of ownership of television, and cable or satellite subscription.

Jewish New Year’s Eve: Israel Reaches 8.4M

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

In the past year, the State of Israel has enlarged its population 1.9 percent, or 158,000 new citizens.

During this past year, 168,000 new Israelis were born and 42,000 died. In addition, 28,000 new olim arrived on aliyah – a 35 percent increase over last year.

The highest percent of new immigrants came from war-torn Ukraine (26 percent), closely followed by France (25 percent), where anti-Semitism is skyrocketing. Those populations were not far ahead of Russia, whose immigration statistic for the year was 21 percent. Immigration from the U.S. only reached nine percent.

Of the now 8.412 million people living in the State of Israel, 6.3 million – the vast majority (74.9 percent) – are Jews.

The next largest population (20.7 percent) in the country is comprised of Israeli Arabs, some 1.746 million people.

The rest (4.4 percent) – 366,000 – are a mix of residents who hail from various other ethnic groups and faiths.

It is believed by those who work in demographics in the Central Bureau of Statistics that Israel’s population will grow to 10 million sometime between 2025 and 2030.

4.8 Million Israelis Traveled Overseas in 2013

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

4.8 million Israelis traveled overseas in 2013, according to a report in Yisrael Hayom.

That’s an amazing number, considering there are only 8 million citizens in Israel. It’s also the highest ratio of travelers to citizens in the world.

It’s was a 11.6% increase from 2012, up from 4.3 million. The average traveler’s age is 40, and 900,000 Israelis traveled out more than once.

July and August accounted for 1.7 million Israelis abroad. If you add in the holidays in September and October, that number jumps to 2.7 million. An astounding one-third of the country was overseas at the same time.

With numbers like that, it’s no wonder Israel never feels crowded.

Quite interesting, the time when most Israelis stop flying out of Israel are during wars and national emergencies, when the number of travelers out of the country drops dramatically and people choose to stay in Israel.

Go figure.

8.081 Million Citizens in Israel on Rosh HaShana Eve

Monday, September 2nd, 2013

On the eve of Rosh Hashana 5774, the population of the State of Israel stands at 8.081 million people according to Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS).

75.1% of the population is Jewish, at 6.066 million people. 20.7% are Arabs at 1.67 million people, and 4.2% or 345,000 people fall into the category of ‘Other’ (Non-Arab Christians, and other minority religions).

It is estimated that there are 1.66 million Arabs living in Judea and Samaria.

The Israeli population rose since last year by 142,000 people, or 1.8% similar to previous years.

163,000 babies were born in 5773, and 40,000 people died.

19,000 people immigrated to Israel.

Shana Tova!

Disputed Territories: The Census of 1967

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

After the Six-Day War, Israel counted the populace of the territories it had taken over in the recent war. On October 3rd 1967 the Central Bureau of Statistics  (CBS) published its initial findings – so the document we’re presenting today was actually never classified at all. We’re posting it here not because it’s been secret all these years, but simply because we’re not aware that it’s online. So now it is.

The document starts out by explaining its methodology: a one-day curfew was placed on each of the various areas, and hundreds of Arabic-speaking census-takers tried to reach every single home (except what they called the ‘wanderers’, presumably the tent-living Bedouin). Every family filled out a form and received a form of confirmation; 20% were asked to fill out comprehensive questionnaires. Since the populace expected potential benefits to accrue from being counted, the CBS reported that compliance had been very high.

The census was taken in August (beginning on the Golan Heights) and September.

On the Golan 6,400 people were enumerated, 2,900 of them in Magdel Shams.

In northern Sinai 33,000 people were counted, 30,000 of them in El-Arish; the Bedouin of the vast Sinai desert were not counted.

In Gaza the census found 356,000 people, about half (175,000) in refugee camps.

On the “West Bank” there were about 600,000, not including East Jerusalem.

(The population of East Jerusalem has been counted, since the Six Day War, in the column of Arabs in Israel, not in the occupied territories. This creates some amusing results, most noticeably when western media outlets who would never accept Israel’s annexation of East Jerusalem routinely count its Palestinian population as part of the 20% of today’s Israeli population who are Arab; present-day demographic statistics routinely double-count the 300-plus Arabs of East Jerusalem as being both part of Israel’s Arab population and the population of the West Bank.)

Beyond the simple numbers, the editors of the report point at a number of possible explanations for the numbers. In Gaza, the Egyptian data from 1965 had about 100,000 additional people, or 25% more than the Israelis counted. Since only a few thousands left as a consequence of the war, and many of them were Egyptians from Sinai and not Gazans, the report assumed someone had been inflating numbers, perhaps by failing to register deaths.

The Jordanian numbers from 1961 were also larger than those identified here, and the editors felt this probably expressed a significant phenomenon of migration during the Jordanian period and after the Six Day War.

The populace of all the territories was very young, children between 0-14 making up the largest group in all areas. the editors were struck, however, by the imbalance between young men and young women; their conjecture being that the relative lack of young men reflected large-scale emigration of laborers.

Visit Israel’s Documented Story.

Israel’s 6 Million Jews Makes It Largest Jewish Center

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Israel’s Jewish population crossed the 6 million mark during Passover, a symbolic sign of peaceful vengeance for the approximately same number of Jews who were exterminated by the Nazi regime.

The Israel Jewish community, which compromises approximately 75 percent of the total population outside of Judea and Samaria, now is the largest in the world, depending on one’s definition of “Who is a Jew?”

The American Jewish population is estimated by most sources as being 5.5 million, while it is up to 2 million larger if one includes as Jewish those who were born to Jewish fathers but not to Jewish fathers and those who were not converted according to Jewish tradition.

The largest American Jewish population center is in New York City, with approximately 2 million. followed by nearly half a million in Paris.

There are approximately 380,000 Jews in Canada, with most of them living in metropolitan Toronto. Next in Line is Britain’s 290,000 Jews.

“In the world today there are 13,800,000 Jews,” Hebrew University Professor Sergio Della Pergola told the Yediot Acharonot newspaper.

“Israel has indeed experienced a growth in the number of Jews last year, but world Jewry outside Israel did not fare so well. On the contrary, world Jewry has experienced negative growth,” reflecting assimilation.

Although most of the world’s Jews live outside Israel, Israeli historian and author Tom Segev told the London Daily Telegraph, “Within five, seven or 10 years, you might be able to say that most Jews in the world live inside Israel, and it will be legitimate to use the cliché that for the first time in 2,000 years, the Jews are in Israel. Then the question will be, what do you do with the Zionist ideology?”

Israelis are attracted to metropolitan Tel Aviv, but massive government programs, including new highways and rail links, are trying to reverse the trend and encourage Jews to settle in the Negev and the Galilee.

Demographics in Proportion

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

There seem to be around 2,600,000 Arabs in Judea and Samaria.  That includes “East Jerusalem.” (See here; and here).

There are also 360,000 Jews in Judea and Samaria.  But add on another 300,000 living in Jerusalem’s post-67 neighborhoods.  Total sum equals 650,000 (to be conservative).

In other words, without Jerusalem, the Jews represent 13.48% of the population in those areas.

With Jerusalem, the figure is 16.9%.

The proportion of Arabs in Israel is 20%.

In other words, we have basically a mirror-image.

If Israel can maintain itself with a minority of 20%, “Palestine” can’t be a state with 17% Jews?

Visit My Right Word.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/my-right-word/demographics-in-proportion/2013/03/20/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: