web analytics
December 10, 2016 / 10 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘fighting’

Report: ISIS Launching Suicide Attacks on Allied Forces Fighting to Retake Mosul

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

In a statement released online after the beginning of the Kurdish and Iraqi assault on Mosul in northern Iraq, ISIS has claimed that it is launching deadly suicide car bomb attacks against the invaders.

More than two years after ISIS forces had entered the city of Mosul, Iraqi Army and Kurdish Peshmerga forces have begun their attack to recapture the city. Fears of an impending humanitarian crisis have already created more refugees, with only about one million civilians estimated to remain in the city, out of a population of two and a half million.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced the assault in a televised address on Monday, announcing, “Today I declare the start of these victorious operations to free you from the violence and terrorism of Daesh (ISIS).”

With US air power, Iraqi forces are still keeping their distance from Mosul itself and are expected to lay siege before directly engaging the jihadists. The terrorist forces are vastly outnumbered, with only an estimated 8,000 warriors in the city and surrounding area.

David Israel

Fighting The Battle Of The Bulge: The Yom Tov Edition

Sunday, October 9th, 2016

If you, like so many others (including me!), watch your weight in an attempt to keep those numbers on the scale heading in a downward direction, you know that this is a pretty tough time of year. Rosh Hashanah and its plethora of calorie-laden goodness may be behind us, and we do have a 25-hour mandated fast coming up this week, but with Sukkos just a few days later, it is hard to keep your weight from going up, up, up over the Yom Tov season.

But difficult doesn’t mean impossible. How to enjoy the yomim tovim without totally torpedoing your diet? To be honest, while the answer is painfully obvious (eat less), it is easier said than done when that sizzling hot potato kugel or those gooey brownies are plunked down in front of you. Like any other solider going to war, you need a battle plan in order to achieve success, and while I can’t promise you that planning ahead for those inevitable temptations will guarantee you won’t gain weight, it is definitely a step in the right direction.

Let me issue a disclaimer right here. I am not a nutritionist or a weight loss expert and I can’t guarantee that I will get through the yomim tovim at exactly the same weight I started at, but I am certainly going to try. Hopefully, sharing my thoughts in print with you guys, my thousands of nearest and dearest friends, will guilt me into sticking to my plan!

Challah: In a perfect world, I could give up meat, chicken, fish, eggs and cheese entirely and live on nothing but freshly-baked breads. Alas, our existence is imperfect and no matter how enticing warm challah may be, overdoing it is only going to lead to regrets. By all means, have a slice of challah with your meal and, if you are going to skip all the other carbs being served, have a second or maybe even a third. But if you are planning on eating a full meal, then stick to one slice and one slice only. Want to trick yourself into thinking you are eating more than you actually are? Cut that slice in half, chew slowly and do your best to pretend you are having two pieces instead of just one.

Dips: The truth is that I am not a mayonnaise eater, which right away prejudices me against dips, which I think are the handiwork of the devil. While the vegetable-based spreads can be fairly low in calories, and chumus is a protein powerhouse, most are nothing more than flavored oil or mayonnaise. Worse yet, most people aren’t just eating heaping spoonfuls of flavored mayonnaise – they are slathering it on, you guessed it, challah (see above), adding more unwanted calories to a meal that is likely to continue with at least two more courses.

Defeat da Fats: Growing up, my father would often refer to the chicken soup having “eyes,” little circles floating at the top of the soup. They are, of course, fat, and definitely something you don’t want to eat; thankfully, you don’t have to. Whether you are making chicken soup, stew, a roast or any meat or poultry-based item in a liquid or sauce, getting rid of those little greasy globs is pretty simple. Just pop the pot, pan or whatever into your fridge for a few hours and the fat will rise to the top, where you can hopefully pick it out with a fork. I have to admit it is a pretty icky process, but nowhere near as gross as ingesting all of that fat.

Late Night Bites: The yomim tovim bring with them quite a few night-time meals, particularly on Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah, when davening can end far later than normal. While every family has their own customs as far as Yom Tov fare, if you can get away with it, try to go lighter for those late-night meals. Do you really need gefilte fish, soup, chicken and potato kugel and chocolate mousse when you are eating at 10 p.m. and going to sleep right after you bentch? Over the years, we have narrowed the menu down for those nights to a light soup and maybe a single kugel and nothing else. Not only does nobody mind, but everyone is happy to skip a heavy meal. Depending on what your family enjoys, you can lighten things up by serving fish instead of meat or chicken, going totally dairy, serving sushi or anything else your family enjoys.

Lovin’ My Oven: When it comes to cutting calories, your oven can be your best friend. Oven-frying is a great way to cut down on the fat and the calories and not only does it go a lot faster than conventional frying but it doesn’t leave messy splatters all over your stovetop. Oven-roasting is also a great way to cook vegetables, with high temperatures, a dash of seasoning and a light drizzle of oil, bringing out the best flavor in your veggies. Investing in a large roasting pan is a worthwhile investment. Look for one that has low sides or no sides to ensure that your vegetables roast instead of steam and line the pan with foil to totally eliminate cleanup time.

Bowling for Greens: Think outside the kugel pan this Yom Tov with plenty of salads. A green salad with cubes of salmon, chicken, meat, cold cuts, cheese or chick peas is great as either an appetizer or a main dish for a lighter meal. Switch things up a little with different greens (romaine, arugula, spinach, cabbage or bok choy, to name a few), a variety of dressings (go easy on those, obviously) and whatever else appeals to you. Walk away from the table feeling sated, not stuffed and you may just find yourself going for meals in a bowl more often.

Dessert: What I should be telling you is to make sure to serve lots of cooked and fresh fruit so that you can finish off your meals with low-calorie treats. If that works for you, then it is absolutely a great idea, but to be perfectly honest, I am scheduling a few really small portions of something decadent in my Yom Tov menus. The rest of the time I am hoping to serve desserts that don’t tempt me and skip any extras like nuts, candy or chips that sometimes make their way to the table. Of course, all bets are off if any good quality chocolate is involved… there are only so many things you can ask a girl to give up without ruining her simchas Yom Tov, and chocolate is definitely not one of them!

Sandy Eller

Jews and Arabs Fighting in Social Security Building

Sunday, October 9th, 2016

A large fight broke out between Jews and Arabs in the Bituach Leumi (Social Security) building in Jerusalem on Shimon ben-Shetach street after news of the terror attack came out.

Police were called in to break up the fight.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Fighting Anti-Israel NGOs And BDS Activists: An Interview with Israeli Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

In just a few years, Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked has shot to political stardom in Israel. A computer engineer turned politician, Shaked, 40, has been a member of Knesset for the Jewish Home party since 2013 and was appointed justice minister by Prime Minister Netanyahu in 2015.

Shaked, a forceful champion of Israel’s rights both at home and abroad, is an outspoken supporter of Jewish settlements and was the driving force behind Israel’s 2016 NGO transparency law.

 

The Jewish Press: Can you describe your background and what influenced your political views and your decision to join the Jewish Home party?

Shaked: I was right wing since I was a child, after having watched a debate between Yitzhak Shamir and Shimon Peres. I served in the army in the Golani Brigade and that also influenced my ideology, since most of the soldiers were from the Religious Zionist movement.

For a few years I was a Likud member, working with Benjamin Netanyahu after the Gaza Disengagement. I decided to leave the Likud and join the Jewish Home party because I thought that it’s very important to have a party that has secular and Orthodox working together on the basis of Religious Zionist values.

How concerned are you that the UN will try to impose a unilateral solution on Israel?

The UN is a very political and biased organization and I don’t believe in truth coming from it. It’s just a body of political interests. The fact that the UN has failed to deal with Syria while hundreds of thousands of women and children are being slaughtered there proves that it does nothing. The UN tries to hit Israel whenever it can in a very biased approach without even mentioning the ongoing incitement by the Palestinian Authority. Just the other day Mahmoud Abbas paid a condolence call to families of terrorists who tried to kill Jews.

The UN also ignores the fact that there are terror attacks conducted in the U.S. for the same reason – radical Islam against the West. In dealing with the UN, Israel should stick to its own beliefs.

Establishing a Palestinian state right now is a very dangerous thing. It’s also not realistic at all. The majority of the people in Israel, including those from the left and center, don’t think we have a partner right now. So Ban Ki-moon can talk, but it’s just wishful thinking. In reality we will do what we think is good for us.

How would you advise America to combat the scourge of Islamist terrorism that both America and Israel face?

You just need to face reality. In Europe they are already facing reality and identifying it as radical Islamic terrorism. We are not at war with Islam. In Israel, 20 percent of the population is Muslim. And we have a very good relationship with them. But we need to distinguish between Islam and radical Islamic terror, which threatens the Western world.

This is actually a war between two civilizations; between the Western world and radical Islamic terror. It’s in the U.S., in Europe, in Israel; it’s all over the Middle East. And radical Islam is mainly aimed at hurting other Muslims. There are hundreds of thousands of Muslims all over the Middle East who have been slaughtered because of this extreme ideology. We need to face this reality.

What is your position on Israel’s claim to Judea and Samaria?

After the Oslo Accords, Judea and Samaria were assigned to areas A, B, and C. Areas A and B are under the Palestinian Authority and area C is under Israeli authority. If you ask me what will be in the end, how will we finish the conflict, I believe we should annex area C. There are 425,000 Jews and 90,000 Arabs who are living there. The Arabs should be full citizens of Israel and get all the according rights. Areas A and B should be a strong autonomy or in conjunction with Jordan.

Under international law, those territories are not occupied territories; they are territories under dispute. There is a lot of land in area C that belongs to the state and we should expand building on those lands. There’s nothing we need to apologize for. It’s legally state land and we should continue to build there.

You initiated and then advanced Israel’s NGO bill through the Knesset. What do you hope it will achieve in terms of deterring agitators from working within Israel?

It’s a transparency bill. In Israel, there are a few NGOs that get the majority of their money from abroad from different countries. Those countries actually try to interfere in a diplomatic way in Israeli policy and are trying to do it through NGOs.

We are not forbidding that, but we want the public to be aware of it. That’s why we passed a transparency bill that any NGO that gets more than 50 percent of its budget from a foreign country should declare it when approaching a Knesset member and in their official publications.

What more can be done about many of these NGOs who are aligned with the BDS movement and their allies, such as the Black Lives Matter delegation that recently visited Israel and accused it of “genocide”?

There are definitely NGOs in Israel that cooperate with BDS groups, mainly in the United States. They actually lay the groundwork for the lies and they distort the facts the BDS groups end up using.

We need to determine what falls under freedom of speech, but we are fighting against the threat of delegitimization the NGOs are pursuing. This is something we are dealing with on a regular basis because it’s based on lies and it hurts Israel.

Unfortunately, many agitators against Israel in these various groups are Jewish. What would you say to them as Jews?

They are confused. I talked about it in the lecture that I gave to the JNF, in which I said there are extreme liberal Jews who just swallow the lies and the propaganda the BDS movement is selling. They are confusing liberal and human rights values with the new anti-Semitism. BDS is perpetrating a fraud and unfortunately there are people who are buying into it.

Sara Lehmann

UPDATE: Serious Deterioration in Peres’ Condition, Brain Damage Irreversible

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

Former President Shimon Peres’ family members on Tuesday told reporters there has been a severe deterioration in his condition. They say the doctors have not been able to wake him up and he has been completely unresponsive. Tests he underwent earlier on Tuesday showed the damage to his brain is irreversible.

According to Peres’s personal physician and son-in-law Prof. Raphy Walden, Peres, 93, is “in very serious condition” and his medical team is afraid of an approaching collapse of his systems since there hasn’t been a significant improvement in his condition.

In recent days Peres has undergone a series of tests that showed his indicators are stable, but he continues to be in serious condition and the family at his bedside is not optimistic about his chances for recovery. Hospital sources have said that despite the fact that his condition has not worsened, “each passing day makes it more difficult to be optimistic.”

On Monday the hospital released a statement saying the former president’s condition remains stable and his indicators have not changed, as his medical team proceeds with applying conservative care in keeping with his neurological and general condition. Last weekend his breathing was reported to have improved a little. The medical team attempted to remove him gradually from the ventilator, and his anesthetic drugs have been reduced. The doctors even reported some attempts on the patient’s part to communicate and to follow instructions such as raising his hands. But on Tuesday his conditioned has worsened.

David Israel

Conversations with Heroes – Is Israel Still Fighting the War of Independence? [audio]

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

The Land of Israel is often referred to as the Promised Land because of The Creator’s repeated promise (Gen. 12:7, 13:15, 15:18, 17:8) to give the Land to the descendants of Abraham. Neither this promise nor history’s overabundance of agreements, proclamations, resolutions, wars, and the establishment of The State of Israel itself seems to have convinced the world that the Jewish people have a rightful claim to this Land.

On this week’s show, Heather speaks with three inspiring Israelis who were born outside the Land of Israel, made Aliyah, and overcame many an obstacle to claim their place in the Land and even utilize their unique talents to help their fellow Jews.

Meet Nina Brenner Bukstein, who heroically overcame the challenges of moving to Israel as a single mom with almost no prospects or income, yet courageously and resolutely built a thriving business; Paint Parties Israel. In the most surprising ways, you will hear how her company’s events both entertain and transform participants across the country.

Rivka Aminoff, Founder and Principal of Kol Hadassa High School (and previous show guest!) returns to discuss her unique relationship to the Land of Israel, which began with her upbringing in Australia to her eventual relocation to Israel. It was dear old Dad who helped her reframe a particularly disappointing first visit to the Western Wall. Check out what he told his daughter about the holy site.

Frequent guest contributor, David Olesker, founder of the Jerusalem Center for Communication and Advocacy Training (JCCAT) checks in this week and makes the case for naming all of Israel’s battles, skirmishes, and intifadas: Israel’s War of Independence. If you think Israel’s War of Independence was a fait accompli in 1948, think again says Olesker.

You may contact any of Heather’s guests from today’s show via their websites: Nina Brenner Bukstein paintpartyevents.com Rivka Aminoff kolhadassa.org David Olesker jccat.org

Conversations with Heroes 21Sept2016 – PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio

Fighting Caliphate with Chaos

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

{Originally posted to the author’s blogsite, Sultan Knish}

Sum up our failed Middle East policy in a nine-letter word starting with an S. “STABILITY.”

Stability is the heart and soul of nation-building. It’s the burden that responsible governments bear for the more irresponsible parts of the world.

First you send experts to figure out what is destabilizing some hellhole whose prime exports are malaria, overpriced tourist knickknacks and beheadings. You teach the locals about democracy, tolerance and storing severed heads in Tupperware containers.

Then if that doesn’t work, you send in the military advisers to teach the local warlords-in-waiting how to better fight the local guerrillas and how to overthrow their own government in a military coup.

Finally, you send in the military. But this gets bloody, messy and expensive very fast.

So most of the time we dispatch sociologists to write reports to our diplomats explaining why people are killing each other in a region where they have been killing each other since time immemorial, and why it’s all our fault. Then we try to figure out how we can make them stop by being nicer to them.

The central assumption here is stability. We assume that stability is achievable and that it is good. The former is completely unproven and even the latter remains a somewhat shaky thesis.

The British wanted stability by replicating the monarchy across a series of Middle Eastern dependents. The vast majority of these survived for a shorter period than New Coke or skunk rock. Their last remnant is the King of Jordan, born to Princess Muna al-Hussein aka Antoinette Avril Gardiner of Suffolk, educated at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, and currently trying to stave off a Muslim Brotherhood-Palestinian uprising by building a billion dollar Star Trek theme park.

The British experiment in stabilizing the Middle East failed miserably. Within a decade the British government was forced to switch from backing the Egyptian assault on Israel to allying with the Jewish State in a failed bid to stop the Egyptian seizure of the Suez Canal.

The American experiment in trying to export our own form of government to Muslims didn’t work any better. The Middle East still has monarchies. It has only one democracy with free and open elections.

Israel. Even Obama and Hillary’s Arab Spring was a perverted attempted to make stability happen by replacing the old Socialist dictators and their cronies with the political Islamists of the Muslim Brotherhood. They abandoned it once the chaos rolled in and stability was nowhere to be found among all the corpses.

It might be time to admit that barring the return of the Ottoman Empire, stability won’t be coming to the Middle East any time soon. Exporting democracy didn’t work. Giving the Saudis a free hand to control our foreign policy didn’t work. Trying to force Israel to make concessions to Islamic terrorists didn’t work. And the old tyrants we backed are sand castles along a stormy shore.

Even without the Arab Spring, their days were as numbered as old King Farouk dying in exile in an Italian restaurant.

If stability isn’t achievable, maybe we should stop trying to achieve it. And stability may not even be any good.

Our two most successful bids in the Muslim world, one intentionally and the other unintentionally, succeeded by sowing chaos instead of trying to foster stability. We helped break the Soviet Union on a cheap budget in Afghanistan by feeding the chaos. And then we bled Iran and its terrorist allies in Syria and Iraq for around the price of a single bombing raid. Both of these actions had messy consequences.

But we seem to do better at pushing Mohammed Dumpty off the wall than at putting him back together again. If we can’t find the center of stability, maybe it’s time for us to embrace the chaos.

Embracing the chaos forces us to rethink our role in the world. Stability is an outdated model. It assumes that the world is moving toward unity. Fix the trouble spots and humanity will be ready for world government. Make sure everyone follows international law and we can all hum Lennon’s “Imagine”.

Not only is this a horrible dystopian vision of the future, it’s also a silly fantasy.

The UN is nothing but a clearinghouse for dictators. International law is meaningless outside of commercial disputes. The world isn’t moving toward unity, but to disunity. If even the EU can’t hold together, the notion of the Middle East becoming the good citizens of some global government is a fairy tale told by diplomats while tucking each other into bed in five-star hotels at international conferences.

It’s time to deal with the world as it is. And to ask what our objectives are.

Take stability off the table. Put it in a little box and bury it in an unmarked grave at Foggy Bottom. Forget about oil. If we can’t meet our own energy needs, we’ll be spending ten times as much on protecting the Saudis from everyone else and protecting everyone else from the Saudis.

Then we should ask what we really want to achieve in the Middle East.

We want to stop Islamic terrorists and governments from harming us. Trying to stabilize failed states and prop up or appease Islamic governments hasn’t worked. Maybe we ought to try destabilizing them.

There have been worse ideas. We’re still recovering from the last bunch.

To embrace chaos, we have to stop thinking defensively about stability and start thinking offensively about cultivating instability. A Muslim government that sponsors terrorism against us ought to know that it will get its own back in spades. Every Muslim terror group has its rivals and enemies waiting to pounce. The leverage is there. We just need to use it.

When the British and the French tried to shut down Nasser, Eisenhower protected him by threatening to collapse the British pound. What if we were willing to treat our Muslim “allies” who fill the treasuries of terror groups the way that we treat our non-Muslim allies who don’t even fly planes into the Pentagon?

We have spent the past few decades pressuring Israel to make deals with terrorists. What if we started pressuring Muslim countries in the same way to deal with their independence movements?

The counterarguments are obvious. Supply weapons and they end up in the hands of terror groups. But the Muslim world is already an open-air weapons market. If we don’t supply anything too high end, then all we’re doing is pouring gasoline on a forest fire. And buying the deaths of terrorists at bargain prices.

Terrorism does thrive in failed states. But the key point is that it thrives best when it is backed by successful ones. Would the chaos in Syria, Nigeria or Yemen be possible without the wealth and power of Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Iran? Should we really fear unstable Muslim states or stable ones?

That is really the fundamental question that we must answer because it goes to the heart of the moderate Muslim paradox. Is it really the Jihadist who is most dangerous or his mainstream ally?

If we believe that the Saudis and Qataris are our allies and that political Islamists are moderates who can fuse Islam and democracy together, then the stability model makes sense. But when we recognize that there is no such thing as a moderate civilizational Jihad, then we are confronted with the fact that the real threat does not come from failed states or fractured terror groups, but from Islamic unity.

Once we accept that there is a clash of civilizations, chaos becomes a useful civilizational weapon.

Islamists have very effectively divided and conquered us, exploiting our rivalries and political quarrels, for their own gain. They have used our own political chaos, our freedoms and our differences, against us. It is time that we moved beyond a failed model of trying to unify the Muslim world under international law and started trying to divide it instead.

Chaos is the enemy of civilization. But we cannot bring our form of order, one based on cooperation and individual rights, to the Muslim world. And the only other order that can come is that of the Caliphate.

And chaos may be our best defense against the Caliphate.

 

Daniel Greenfield

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/sultan-knish/fighting-caliphate-with-chaos/2016/09/11/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: