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October 24, 2014 / 30 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘haaretz’

French Ambassador: Oslo Had ‘More Failures than Advantages’

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

JERUSALEM, Israel, Sept. 5th–The Oslo peace process had “more failures than advantages,” French Ambassador to Israel Christophe Bigot told a delegation of pro-Land of Israel rabbis during a meeting at the French Embassy in Tel Aviv on Wednesday.

Bigot also joked that the embassy might be moved to Jerusalem, saying that while the space that housed the embassy had its drawbacks, it was only a  “temporary residence because” –switching to Hebrew– “Leshana Haba’ah Biyerusholayim” (next year in Jerusalem).

The statements are not typical of a representative of a European country which views advocates the creation of a Palestinian state or the “land for peace” formula behind the Oslo Accords and the so-called “peace process” which followed them.

France also believes, like the United States, that the status of Jerusalem should be determined in final status negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

By the time this article was published, Bigot could not be reached for a response, but his comments were confirmed by two members of the delegation who met with Bigot and with whom the Jewish Press spoke separately.

The delegation visiting Bigot represented the Rabbinical Congress for Peace, a group which says it represents 350 leading Israeli rabbis who oppose ceding any kind of territory. They met with Bigot in order to urge France to oppose the creation of a Palestinian state and to ask that France stop European Union funding of anti-Israel groups which operate in Israel.

“These groups operate under the guise of peace and human rights but the money that the EU gives them is used for incitement against Israel, against co-existence and leads to bloodshed,” Rabbi Shlomo Rosenfeld, Rabbi of Shadmot said.

In response to Bigot’s comment about the Oslo process, Rabbi Joseph Gerlitzky, the organization’s Chairman told the Ambassador, “let’s be precise – it was failures without any advantages.”

Rabbi Gerlitzky is the Rabbi of Central Tel Aviv.

Rabbi Avrohom S. Lewin, the organization’s director, told Bigot that “the past 40 years have proven that the ‘land for peace’ formula is a failure and only leads to bloodshed and instability in the region.”

The delegation presented Bigot with a “p’sak din” – a juridical ruling in Jewish law – holding that it was forbidden to cede territory from Israeli control because it would endanger people’s lives.

The ruling has been signed by the 350 rabbis who are said to support the Rabbinical Congress for Peace.

Speaking over the phone with the Jewish Press, Rabbi Lewin said that the ruling was drafted in 1993, marking the beginning of the Rabbinical Congress for Peace.

“What’s unique about the ruling,” Rabbi Lewin said, “is that this ruling is not based on kedushat ha’aretz (the holiness of the land) but pikuach nefesh (saving lives).”

During the conversation Bigot also noted that while French citizens view Israelis as “occupiers who are against Palestinian aspirations” they should not be blamed as “that is exactly how Israelis portrayed in its own paper, Ha’aretz.”

Rabbi Lewin said he believed Bigot was implying that Ha’aretz’s left-wing reporting played a role in the distorted European view of the Israeli-Arab conflict.

While Bigot offered counter arguments on many issues raised by the delegation, he said he would convey their requests as well as the ruling to the French government.

Fledgling Israel Lacrosse 2-0 in European Championships

Sunday, June 24th, 2012

Israel’s lacrosse team – which did not exist just two years ago – is dazzling the world of sports, defeating Slovakia and France in recent matches to stand 2-0 in its first-ever European Championships.

On Thursday, Israel defeated number 17 ranked Slovakia 11-8, and then number 27 ranked France in a drenching rain on Friday.

On Sunday, Israel faces number 24 ranked Norway.

Israel Lacrosse was founded by Scott Neiss who came to Israel for the first time on Birthright in 2010.  He made aliyah to Tel Aviv and decided to bring his passion for the sport to his new home.

So smitten was Neiss with Israel during his trip, and so ardent a lacrosse enthusiast, that he conducted research on bringing lacrosse to Israel during the early days of his tour, ultimately sneaking away from his group to rendezvous with Israeli contacts given to him by his own connections at the international lacrosse federation.

The team is comprised of 43 men from teams in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, as well as Jewish players from other countries.  The team was given official recognition by the Ministry of Culture and Sports and permission to represent the state at the European Championships in Amsterdam.  It is coached by another immigrant from the United States, Bill Beroza, member of the US Lacrosse Hall of Fame and the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

Israel Lacrosse is organizing clubs dedicated to the sport across the country to encourage youth to play.  According to an interview done with Haaretz, Neiss said the clinics are always conducted in Hebrew, even though a large number of the new devotees come from English-speaking families.  “If we’re speaking English, the question Israelis ask is ‘Who are these crazy Americans?’  If we’re speaking Hebrew, the question is ‘What is this sport?’” Neiss told Haaretz.

A women’s team is also in the works.

Benzion Netanyahu, Father of Prime Minister Benjamin, Dies at 102

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Benzion Netanyahu, the father of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Entebbe rescue hero Yoni Netanyahu, died Monday at his Jerusalem home at the age of 102. The elder Netanyahu was visited by his son Benjamin for the last time on Sunday at the family home on 4 Haportzim Street.  He will be laid to rest on Monday at 5pm at Jerusalem’s Har Menuchot Cemetery.

Benzion Netanyahu served as secretary to Revisionist Zionist proponent and Beitar leader Ze’ev Jabotinsky, served as editor for the Encyclopaedia Hebraica, and served as professor emeritus at Cornell University.

Born in Warsaw on March 25, 1910 as Benzion Milikovsky, he and his family immigrated to Israel in 1920.  In 1944, he married Tzila Segal, with whom he had three sons: Yonatan, born 1946, a former commander of the elite Sayeret Matkal who was killed in the 1976 Operation Entebbe rescue of 102 Israeli and other hostages, Benjamin, born 1949, and Ido, born 1952, a radiologist, author, and playwright.

Working as the secretary of Zionist icon Ze’ev Jabotinsky, Netanyahu maintained a belief in Jewish sovereignty over the Greater Land of Israel, including parts of Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt.  He was one of the signers of a petition against the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine in 1947.

Benzion’s strong Zionist values were a major part of Benjamin’s upbringing.  The prime minister’s father imparted on him the importance of protecting Jewish heritage sites such as Hebron.  He advocated a tough stance in the region, and predicted that threats to world peace would emerge from parts of the Muslim world harboring violence, terror, nuclear power, and oil.

According to a report in Haaretz, Prime Minister Netanyahu stated that his father predicted a Muslim attack on the Twin Towers in New York, as well as the rise of tyrannical Islamic regimes which would make efforts to attain nuclear weapons.

In his last interview with Channel 2 news – at the age of 99, Benzion stated that his powerful son does not support a Palestinian state.  “He supports the kind of (diplomatic) conditions they (the Palestinians) would never in the world accept,” Benzion said.  “That’s what I heard from him.  Not from me – he put forth the conditions.  These conditions – they will never be accepted, not even one of them.”

“No, No, Herzl and Landau did not toil in order to build a Palestinian state,” Benzion told the reporter.  “This land is a land of the Jews, not a land of the Arabs.  There is no room here for Arabs, there will not be, and they will never negotiate to terms (which would create a Palestinian state).”

Moreover, Benzion believed that Arab citizens are a threat to the fabric of Israel, and that they would conflict with the Jews by nature.  “The tendency to conflict is in the essence of the Arab.  He is an enemy by essence… His existence is one of perpetual war,” Benzion is quoted by the Associated Press as telling Maariv in 2009. “The Arab citizens’ goal is to destroy us. They don’t deny that they want to destroy us.”

Benzion was a strong opponent of Israel’s unilateral withdrawal from the Jewish communities in Gaza known as Gush Katif.  The forced expulsion of Jewish residents who wanted to remain in the area was a “crime against humanity”, according to Benzion.

As an academic, Netanyahu specialized in Medieval Spanish Jewry.  In his controversial book on the subject, he rejected the theory that the Spanish Inquisition was a result of Jewish isolationism or separatism, saying Spanish Jews were interested in assimilating into Christian society and Spanish culture, and were forced into being Marranos when their efforts to shed their Jewishness did not afford them full acceptance.

Ha’aretz Independence Day Recipes Kosher in English, Traif Galore in Hebrew

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

If you’re an American Jew looking for an Independence Day recipe, Ha’aretz in English is a safe place for you. You’ll find there a discussion of the perfect hamburger, as befits the national holiday of outdoor barbecuing.

“There are as many versions of a good hamburger as there are stars in the sky, but all of them have one common denominator: beef with proper texture,” writes Limor Laniado Tiroche. “So, there are two things to watch out for – the type of beef and the way it is chopped.”

Really?

If Ms. Laniado Tiroche were to click over to her own paper’s Hebrew language website, she may discover an additional component, besides beef: goat cheese.

As if to be extremely specific about violating the commandment of “thou shalt not cook a kid in its own mother’s milk,” Hilla Kriv is pushing “Cheese filled kebabs for Independence Day.”

Away from the critical eyes of American readers, Ha’aretz sings the praise of little kebab patties: “They are small, juicy, and stuffed with goat cheese, which has melted and turned into a sauce rich in flavors.”

Yummy…

Israel to Launch Google Street View

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Famed Google Maps application Street View, which is a technology featured in Google Maps and Google Earth providing 360-degree panoramic views from positions along streets throughout the world, will be launched in Israel on Sunday.

Just eight months since Google was given the go-ahead by the Law, Information, and Technology Authority to release special Street View photography cars throughout Israel to photograph streets in Israel’s major cities, the launch will be celebrated on April 22 with Israeli government officials in attendance.

The service, which has been the source of controversy and privacy lawsuits in several countries, will feature images of the streets of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Nazareth and Mizpe Ramon, as well as the Dead Sea and the Kinneret/Sea of Galilee.

According to the Haaretz newspaper, Israeli authorities required Google to provide full details of all routes Google photographers intended to take, as well as to provide residents with the capability of blurring out license plates, homes, and other personal information before images are published.

Additionally, any litigation which may result from the Google’s Israeli Street View images must be conducted in Israel, not the United States. Google has also promised not to dispute criminal claims against it by arguing that the Law, Information, and Technology Authority lacks the standing to prosecute.

Lessons in Propaganda: Ha’aretz Bungles Numbers in Effort to Squash ‘Settler’ College

Sunday, March 25th, 2012

Anyone with a basic knowledge of third-grade math will raise an eyebrow at the mathematical gyrations displayed by the Israeli daily Ha’aretz regarding the efforts to block the certification of Ariel College, located east of the ,67 armistice line, as a full-fledged university. The numbers in their report on academicians’ objections to the new facility just don’t jive.

The headline reads:

Thousands of academics against turning Ariel College into a University

The first line of the opening paragraph reads:

About a thousand academic scholars, including 18 Israel Prize laureates, signed a petition calling to stop the process of transforming the University Center in Ariel into a fully-recognized university.

The second sentence in that same opening paragraph reads:

The petition was sent last month to Education Minister Gideon Sa’ar bearing 300 signatures.

 

We screen-shot the Hebrew version, just in case it gets "scrubbed" later

We screen-shot the Hebrew version, just in case it gets "scrubbed" later

This reminds me of the story of the guy who comes running into town screaming that he’d been chased by a thousand wolves.

“A thousand wolves, are you sure?” the townspeople ask him.

“Fine, not a thousand, but 500 wolves is plenty scary,” says the man.

“Really? 500 wolves? That sounds like a whole lot for these parts…”

“Maybe there were fewer, but, trust me, even 100 wolves are a frightening thing to behold…”

“And you’re sure, there were 100 wolves there?”

“Could be 20…”

“As many as 20, you’re saying?”

“Maybe fewer… Maybe just three wolves, but fierce, hungry wolves each one of them!”

“You actually saw three wolves?”

“Well, who do you think was making those noises in the bushes?”

If the number of objectors to Ariel’s recognition as a university hovers around 300 – unless a few of them had signed without knowing it, those things have happened – then the folks at the new university have nothing to fear.

The petition drive has been the brainchild of Prof. Nir Gov, of the Weizmann Institute. Gov told Ha’aretz: “When did the Council for Higher Education decide that another university was needed in Israel? Who said that Ariel is the college that can most efficiently become an official research university in Israel?”

Turns out it was at least four of Gov’s own colleagues, who were cited by Ha’aretz as opposing the petition: Israel Prize laureate Prof. Meir Wilchek, of the Weizmann Institute, who is a member of the Council for Higher Education of Judea and Samaria, along with Nobel Prize laureate Prof. Yisrael Aumann, and three other professors, who told the paper yesterday: “We examined Ariel academically and we found that, from the point of view of the quality of the scientists there, they are no less good than the scientists who signed the petition.”

In the end, it’s down to location, location, location. What bugs Prof. Gov and his 299 (if that many) supporters, is the fact that a thriving Jewish center east of the green line is thriving even more, to the point where it is able to compete for cultural influence on the academic level. The same Prof. Gov would never have dreamed of saying “When did the Council for Higher Education decide that another university was needed in Israel?” if the center in question was in Arab Taibe, or in Druze Usafia.

It’s Jewish Ariel in Samaria that gets this scientist’s goat. Too bad Ha’aretz can’t hire night editors with a better grasp of elementary math. Perhaps they should start hiring Ariel graduates.

Cyber Attacks UPDATE: Anti-Israeli Hacker Strikes Haaretz News Website

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

An anti-Israeli hacker struck the Israeli newspaper Haaretz‘s  Hebrew website on Wednesday, not long after the websites of Israeli hospitals were taken offline.

Haaretz reported that it received a Twitter message from a user named ‘Anonymous Palestine’ claiming responsibility for the hack attack.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/cyber-attacks-update-anti-israeli-hackers-strike-haaretz-news-website/2012/01/25/

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