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November 25, 2015 / 13 Kislev, 5776
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Posts Tagged ‘olim’

Bayit Yehudi Opens English-Speakers Forum

Sunday, October 12th, 2014

Bayit Yehudi announced today the formation of a new English-Speakers Forum. The forum was created with the goal of increasing activity in the party for tackling Western immigrant issues and increasing the number of party members and voters who speak English. The forum will be represented in the various party institutions, including Knesset faction meetings on relevant issues, and will be a factor in forming all party positions regarding immigration and absorption. It will also be an address for English speaking Bayit Yehudi supporters in the Diaspora.

The forum will assist MKs with English language correspondences and conduct quarterly meetings with MKs on a wide range of topics with the purpose of forming position papers on key issues facing the English-speaking Oleh community. With their Western culture, the forum will also advance the democratic values of accountability, transparency and representation in the party.

On September 10th, 2014 the Bayit Yehudi Central Committee approved a new party constitution and this new constitution redistributed the party control to 13 different party institutions. The new Bayit Yehudi forums, of which 12 new forums were created, count as one of those 13 institutions. The official definition of a “Forum” according to the new Bayit Yehudi Constitution is as follows: “A Forum is an internal party body, comprising Bayit Yehudi Central Committee members and Bayit Yehudi members, and its job is to discuss and present recommendations to the party and the other party institutions regarding the issues it was tasked with dealing with”. The constitution states that “Forums are active within the party membership and act as advisory bodies to all party institutions. Forums will work in cooperation with the institutions of the party.” Forums work alongside three other party institutions, the Central Committee, the Bureau, and the Secretariat. The Central Committee, the supreme party institution, receives reports on the Forum discussions and recommendations, and is has the power to discuss them at Central Committee meetings and adopt them through a vote. The Bureau, the ideological institution, also receives reports on Forum activities and decisions. The Secretariat, the executive branch of the party, determines Forums working methods and the range of their activities.” Bayit Yehudi English Speakers’ Forum Chairman Jeremy Saltan told JewishPress.com:

“The Bayit Yehudi is the natural home Zionist Olim. We are the only party in the Knesset that opposes a Palestinian State west of the Jordan River and protects Jewish sovereignty in Jerusalem. Just this week Minister Bennett initiated the free shuttle bus program from the old train station through the City of David to the Western Wall. This new Forum shows the importance the Bayit Yehudi places on English speaking immigrants. We are the only party promoting accountability, transparency and representation to our voters. I want to thank Bayit Yehudi Chairman Minister Naftali Bennett & Bayit Yehudi Director General Nir Orbach for prioritizing Western Zionist immigrant issues.”

Jeremy Saltan is a veteran “Knesset Insider”, campaigner and political analyst.

Saltan is also a familiar face to JewishPress.com readers. Besides having made Aliyah from Chicago to Israel, his blog has appeared on JewishPress.com, and he is regular guest on the Yishai Fleishers’s JewishPress.com radio show.

Saltan served as the campaign manager for Bayit Yehudi’s highly successful English language campaign for the 19th Knesset, having managed Bayit Yehudi candidate Jeremy Gimpel’s primary campaign and as a political and legislative assistant to National Union leader Yaakov Ketzeleh Katz in the 18th Knesset. He is also Bayit Yehudi’s Party Branch Director in Mevasseret Tzion where he serves on the city council’s Defense, Status of Women and Immigration & Absorption Committees, and holds the Religious Culture portfolio. The Central Committee Member is also a member of Bayit Yehudi’s Party Branch Leader, Women, and Youth Forums. He also works as a contributor on Voice of Israel.

Bayit Yehudi Director General Nir Orbach said, “The Forum is our way to help integrate these quality immigrants, who are here by choice, into Israeli society by addressing issues that are important to them. I want to thank Jeremy Saltan for everything he has done until now, and I look forward to working with him in the near future. Jeremy is a loyal partner on our path towards the leadership of the country.”

Israel’s Population Nears 9 Million

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

Israel’s population grew by nearly 200,000 in the past 12 months and is 8,904,373 three days before the Rosh HaShanah New Year, which begins Wednesday night.

The figures include 24,801 new immigrants whom Israel welcomed the past 12 months.

More than 176,000 new babies were born in the current Hebrew year, according to the Ministry of Population and immigration, and baby boys outnumbered girls by more than 5,000.

The most popular Hebrew names were traditional, with Yosef, Daniel and Ori leading the pack for boys. The most frequent names for girls were Tamar, Noa and Shira.

The divorce rate was approximately 25 percent, far below the rate of Western countries.

A Presidential Welcome to Israel

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

Only in Israel…

Israeli President Ruby Rivlin personally welcomed new Olim (immigrants) as they step off the plane today, August 12, 2014.

This flight was called the “Soldier’s Flight” as 110 of the young people on this Aliyah flight are joining the IDF.

New Olim on the "Soldier's Flight" right after landing in Israel.

New Olim on the “Soldier’s Flight” right after landing in Israel.

Aliyah Up by 14 Percent in First Three Months of 2014

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

Aliyah to Israel increased by 14 percent from January to the end of March, with the most impressive numbers coming from Russia and France, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics.

Russia led the aliyah number list with 899 new immigrants, followed by France with 802.

One veteran French immigrant told The Jewish Press that despite the flight to Israel from France, plagued by violent anti-Semitism, there is a far greater exodus of Jews to the United States and Canada.

The third largest source of new immigrants so far this year is the United States, from where 203 arrived, and another 23 came from Canada.

The total number of new immigrants for the first three months of this year is 3,623.

Americans in Beit Shemesh Present the Better Side of Haredim

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Amid the buzz surrounding issues of religious-secular tension—such as proposed Israeli legislation to mandate Haredi enlistment in the Israel Defense Forces and a recent rally where hundreds of thousands of people protested the bill—Haredi entrepreneurship in the Jewish state doesn’t receive the attention it deserves.

Critics lament the lack of Haredi integration into both the military and the Israeli workforce, but  Beit Shemesh, located 20 miles west of Jerusalem with a population of 100,000 people, is home to innovators like Rabbi Joel Padowitz, whose ventures have a direct relationship with the Haredi community.

Padowitz, 36, is co-creator of what he believes is a “game-changing” product for Israeli tourism and business called the “Israel App.” Originally from San Diego, Padowitz made aliyah in 2009 and lives in Beit Shemesh with his wife and six children. He teaches Mishnah every day at a men’s kollel in Beit Shemesh, is an avid mountain biker, and is the founder of a Manhattan-based investment bank. He has rabbinical ordination and an MBA from Bar-Ilan University, and he now is now pursuing a BA in social science from Harvard University.

The co-founder and manager of the Israel App is equally eclectic 28-year-old Yaakov Lehman, formerly from Tucson, Ariz., who is married with a newborn child. A part-time rabbinic student and part-time social entrepreneur, he has a BA from the University of California, Santa Barbara in global studies, an MA from the London School of Economics in economic history, and an MA from the University of Vienna in world history. He came to Israel in 2008.

“The reason I founded the Israel App is because people come to Israel and do not get a legitimate or even meaningful presentation of this incredible country,” Padowitz tells JNS.org. “We cater to the majority of tourists who don’t hire human tour guides. We want to give them a way to appreciate more deeply all that Israel has to offer.”

The Israel App, which currently has about 6,000 users, contains GPS-guided tours for any tourist who needs to find sites or hotels or restaurants, a virtual concierge for making reservations, coupons, and background content like an “Israepedia,” a glossary covering a wide variety of historical information. Tourists can use the app without roaming charges as they travel around the country.

When Padowitz and Lehman initiated their project, they began looking for a programming team. They happened upon NetSource and its subsidiary, Concept Creative Technology, a service provider of software development. “We liked the service, the price, and their work environment,” says Lehman.

NetSource’s 48-year-old CEO, Mazal Shirem, is a divorced mother of three who grew up as an Orthodox Jew in Jerusalem, where she lived until the age of 20. After 16 years with Intel and a stint in Munich, Germany, she found a business partner for her new venture whose mission “was to get Orthodox people into the employment market and give them the tools they need to learn the work environment.”

NetSource was launched in 2010 and today employs 200 people—90 percent Haredi women and 5 percent Haredi men—almost all living in Beit Shemesh. According to Shirem, the company operates so that the employees “receive the full respect of their lifestyle, including the on-site kosher kitchen, flexible work hours, and even proper subjects on which they work.”

Tamar, a 26-year-old Haredi mother of a two toddlers, is consulting with Shirem in her office. She started work there a year and a half ago as a secretary and worked her way up to an account manager.

“I really like to work here,” she says. “The girls are very nice and it’s convenient for me to work in this company because I find all the conditions which I need in order for me to go out and do my job in an appropriate environment.”

With Olive Oil, Olim Spread the Light of Torah

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Two olim are taking charge to revitalize one of Israel’s oldest agricultural areas. Combining tzedakah and environmentalism, Nili Abrahams and Rabbi Shmuel Veffer, through their new organization, Shemen LaMeor, are harvesting olives that would otherwise be wasted, creating pure oil to raise money for yeshivas, schools, and food programs for needy families in their community, Yavne’el, and throughout the Lower Galilee.

From the Torah, the phrase “shemen lameor” means “oil that illuminates.” “The whole purpose,” says Abrahams, “is to use the oil to spread light… and light is Torah.”

To highlight the importance of trees, the pair, along with local rabbis and other community members, unveiled the organization this past Tu b’Shvat. The organization will use the area’s surplus olives and boutique kosher olive oil to build relationships within and beyond Israel.

They are also raising awareness about the increasingly dire situation in the region. The Lower Galilee, two hours from Jerusalem, had strong agricultural origins, which still attract many olim. “People love the idea of connection with the land,” says Abrahams, “of a safe haven for the children… a very simple lifestyle.” Yet that agricultural way of life is threatened by many forces.

Twenty minutes from Tiberias, Yavne’el, home to 3,000 residents, “had an incredible heyday of agriculture: tobacco, date palms, olives, citrus,” says Abrahams.

But the older generation of farmers can’t maintain their fields. And, she says, “if farmers can’t afford to keep up their farms… there is a significant number of Arabs waiting to buy up the land.”

According to the latest Israeli Census Bureau statistics, for 2011, the Arab population in northern Israel (not including Haifa) is just over 53 per cent, while Jews make up just under 44 per cent.

The Israeli government and organizations like Nefesh b’Nefesh have been battling to rebuild the Jewish presence in the region since the 1980s. In Dec. 2013, the World Zionist Organization’s Settlement Division announced its intention to build two new towns for 100,000 Jewish residents. At the time, MK Hanna Swaid criticized the move as part of a “demographic war” that is meaningless without “infrastructure improvements and a reduction in the… employment gaps.”

Idyllic in some ways, life in the Lower Galilee can be devastating for families. “Most of the men aren’t home for the week, just for Shabbat. Some travel to Jerusalem, some travel to Bnei Brak… to work, and then come home for Shabbat,” says Abrahams, who has run a bed and breakfast with her husband Arnie since making aliyah to the area from Toronto, Canada two and a half years ago.

Shemen LaMeor will create jobs and reinvigorate the region’s agriculture while preserving its unique character. “Kids here know how to plant, herd sheep, ride horses,” Abrahams says. “They really have a very good feel for the land; they know how to lead a simple life.”

Rabbi Veffer, creator of the KosherLamp, which has changed late-night Shabbat reading for religious families around the world, was Associate Rabbi of Toronto’s The Village Shul Aish HaTorah Learning Centre before returning to Israel nearly four years ago.

Abrahams says they both wanted to help out by tapping into local resources that would otherwise be wasted. “A lot of the olive trees are actually abandoned, not picked, nothing’s done with them.”

“The area is blessed with abundance,” she says. “Everyone’s got citrus and passionfruit and everyone’s got olives… We’re reclaiming the land, reclaiming the olives.”

Rich in Jewish history, the area around Yavne’el is where, according to the Book of Judges, the warrior Deborah led her battle against Canaanite general Sisera. It’s also the site of the Golani tree, the oak tree symbolizing the legendary IDF brigade. Nearby Tiberias is considered the fourth-holiest city in Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was written and the great teacher Maimonides buried.

Shemen LaMeor has built relationships with farmers to secure 1500 dunam (1.5 square kilometres) of land to prepare for its first picking season this fall. They will compensate some farmers with a tax receipt, others with a percentage of the oil for personal use or resale.

Abrahams says the organization welcomes volunteers, seminary and yeshiva students, and other willing groups, who will donate their labour for a morning or afternoon and learn how olives are picked and processed into one of Israel’s purest, most ancient bounties. “We’ll press the oil for them on the spot… it’ll be a great part of their visit to the north.”

Together, they hope to extend the Jewish world’s appreciation for Israel in its entirety. “I see this as a way of going beyond Jerusalem,” says Abrahams. “Every single part of Israel is vital… to our existence.”

“The abundance here is God-given. We don’t want to waste that… so we’re using the abundance for ohr, to spread the light of Torah around the world.” For more information about Shemen LaMeor, visit shemenlameor.org.

Aliyah from the US Down13 Percent in 2013

Monday, December 30th, 2013

Only 2,680 Jews moved to Israel from the United States this past year, an 11 percent decrease from the 3.070 who “made aliyah” in 2012, according to information provided by the Jewish Agency and Ministry for Absorption and immigration.

The number of new olim from Canada was virtually unchanged, with 321 moving to Israeli in 2013, two more than in 2012.

The decline of American olim continues the reversal of an upwards trend in Aliyah that peaked in 2008 and raises questions about the future of American Zionism, if it is defined as packing up and leaving “home” to go home. In 2008, 3,300 Jews moved from the United States and Canada to Israel. The number declined slightly to 3,260 in 2009 and then dropped sharply the following two years to 2,801 and 2,575.

No figures were supplied concerning the breakdown of affiliation, but Jews who identify with Orthodoxy have consistently been the largest group, usually between half and two-thirds of new olim.

Aliyah from other countries this past year generally increased, with the most dramatic rise in France, with the arrival of 3,120 immigrants this year, compared to 1,916 in 2012.

The biggest decrease was registered in Ethiopia, which was expected because of the conclusion of Operation Dove’s Wings

“Every immigrant who arrives in order to make his or her home in Israel fills me with joy and I hope Aliyah continues to increase, “said Immigration Minister Sofa Minister Landver.

Chairman Sharansky: “That 19,200 Jews have chosen to establish their lives in Israel is a concrete expression of Israel’s

According to an analysis of the data, Israel experience programs for French Jewish youth and Aliyah encouragement efforts

Jewish Agency Chairman Natan Sharansky stated, “Israel is the beating heart of the Jewish people. That 19,200 Jews have chosen to establish their lives in Israel is a concrete expression of Israel’s centrality to Jewish life and to Jews around the world. This is an era of Aliyah by choice, rather than Aliyah of rescue.”

Given the assimilation rate of approximately 70 percent in the United States, that statement could easily be argued.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/aliyah-from-the-united-states-down-13-percent-in-2013/2013/12/30/

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