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October 23, 2016 / 21 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘israel’s’

German Owners to Sell Stake in Israel’s Leftwing Bastion Newspaper

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

German media group DuMont Schauberg wants to sell its 20% holdings in Haaretz, the Israeli print and online publishing group which is synonymous with leftwing politics and anti-Netanyahu campaigns, its publisher Amos Schocken told the Financial Times. The Schocken family is the majority stock owner of Haaretz, which was founded in 1918 by the British military government in Palestine and established in 1919 as a Zionist paper by a group of businessmen including prominent philanthropist Isaac Leib Goldberg. In 1937, the paper was purchased by Jewish German department store owner Salman Schocken, who made his son, Gershom Schocken, chief editor in 1939, a position he held until his death in 1990.

The Schocken family owned 100% of the Haaretz Group until August 2006, when M. DuMont Schauberg acquired 25% of the shares for about $28 million. At the time, many in Israel pointed out the fact that DuMont Schauberg’s father, Kurt Neven DuMont, had been a member of the German Nazi party, and used his publishing house to promote Nazi propaganda.

In June 2011, Israeli-Russian businessman Leonid Nevzlin purchased a 20% stake in the Haaretz Group, 15% coming from Schocken and 5% from M. DuMont Schauberg. At this point, Schocken owns only 60% of the company.

Amos Schocken told FT he was helping DuMont Schauberg search for “an investor who will essentially replace them.”

According to Schocken, DuMont Schauberg’s new management, appointed last year, prefers to focus on “their core publishing assets in Germany,” which leaves out Haaretz, their only foreign asset.

Two tidbits about Haaretz we dug up in Wikipedia: Andrea Levin, executive director of the American pro-Israel Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting (CAMERA) said Haaretz was doing “damage to the truth” and sometimes making serious factual errors but not often correcting them; and former Haaretz editor-in-chief David Landau said at the 2007 Limmud conference in Moscow that he had told his staff not to report about criminal investigations against Prime Minister Ariel Sharon in order to promote Sharon’s plan to expel thousands of Jews from their homes in the Gaza Strip.

Haaretz keeps a stable of pundits who daily attack Jewish communities in the liberated territories, Jewish institutions, and traditional Zionist endeavors. It is also a dedicated enemy of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife Sara. Despite its low circulation in Israel, compared with giant dailies like Yediot and Israel Hayom, Haaretz has for many years been considered Israel’s most influential newspaper. Go figure.

David Israel

FULL TEXT: US President Barack Obama’s Eulogy for Israel’s 9th President, Shimon Peres, z’l [video]

Saturday, October 1st, 2016

U.S. President Barack Obama delivered his eulogy on Friday, Sept. 30, 2016 with members of the Peres family, Israeli government leaders and several other world heads of state who bid their fellow statesman a final farewell from the podium. Below is the full text and a video of his eulogy.

Zvia, Yoni, Chemi and generations of the Peres family; President Rivlin; Prime Minister Netanyahu; members of the Israeli government and the Knesset; heads of state and the government and guests from around the world, including President Abbas, whose presence here is a gesture and a reminder of the unfinished business of peace; to the people of Israel: I could not be more honored to be in Jerusalem to say farewell to my friend Shimon Peres, who showed us that justice and hope are at the heart of the Zionist idea.

A free life, in a homeland regained. A secure life, in a nation that can defend itself, by itself. A full life, in friendship with nations who can be counted on as allies, always. A bountiful life, driven by simple pleasures of family and by big dreams. This was Shimon Peres’s life. This is the State of Israel. This is the story of the Jewish people over the last century, and it was made possible by a founding generation that counts Shimon as one of its own.

Shimon once said, “The message of the Jewish people to mankind is that faith and moral vision can triumph over all adversity.” For Shimon, that moral vision was rooted in an honest reckoning of the world as it is. Born in the shtetl, he said he felt, “surrounded by a sea of thick and threatening forests.”

When his family got the chance to go to Palestine, his beloved grandfather’s parting words were simple: “Shimon, stay a Jew.” Propelled with that faith, he found his home. He found his purpose. He found his life’s work.

But he was still a teenager when his grandfather was burned alive by the Nazis in the town where Shimon was born. The synagogue in which he prayed became an inferno. The railroad tracks that had carried him toward the Promised Land also delivered so many of his people to death camps.

And so from an early age, Shimon bore witness to the cruelty that human beings could inflict on each other, the ways that one group of people could dehumanize another; the particular madness of anti-Semitism, which has run like a stain through history. That understanding of man’s ever-present sinfulness would steel him against hardship and make him vigilant against threats to Jewry around the world.

But that understanding would never harden his heart. It would never extinguish his faith. Instead, it broadened his moral imagination, and gave him the capacity to see all people as deserving of dignity and respect. It helped him see not just the world as it is, but the world as it should be.

What Shimon did to shape the story of Israel is well-chronicled. Starting on the kibbutz he founded with his love Sonya, he began the work of building a model community. Ben Gurion called him to serve the Haganah at headquarters to make sure that the Jewish people had the armaments and the organization to secure their freedom.

After independence, surrounded by enemies who denied Israel’s existence and sought to drive it into the sea, the child who had wanted to be a “poet of stars” became a man who built Israel’s defense industry, who laid the foundation for the formidable armed forces that won Israel’s wars.

His skill secured Israel’s strategic position. His boldness sent Israeli commandos to Entebbe, and rescued Jews from Ethiopia. His statesmanship built an unbreakable bond with the United States of America and so many other countries.

His contributions didn’t end there. Shimon also showed what people can do when they harness reason and science to a common cause. He understood that a country without many natural resources could more than make up for it with the talents of its people.

He made hard choices to roll back inflation and climb up from a terrible economic crisis. He championed the promise of science and technology to make the desert bloom, and turned this tiny country into a central hub of the digital age, making life better not just for people here, but for people around the world.

Indeed, Shimon’s contribution to this nation is so fundamental, so pervasive, that perhaps sometimes they can be overlooked.

For a younger generation, Shimon was probably remembered more for a peace process that never reached its endpoint. They would listen to critics on the left who might argue that Shimon did not fully acknowledge the failings of his nation, or perhaps more numerous critics on the right who argued that he refused to see the true wickedness of the world, and called him naïve.

But whatever he shared with his family or his closest friends, to the world he brushed off the critics. And I know from my conversations with him that his pursuit of peace was never naïve.

Every Yom HaShoah, he read the names of the family that he lost. As a young man, he had fed his village by working in the fields during the day, but then defending it by carrying a rifle at night.

He understood, in this war-torn region, where too often Arab youth are taught to hate Israel from an early age — he understood just how hard peace would be. I’m sure he was alternatively angry and bemused to hear the same critics, who called him hopelessly naïve, depend on the defense architecture that he himself had helped to build.

I don’t believe he was naïve. But he understood from hard-earned experience that true security comes through making peace with your neighbors. “We won them all,” he said of Israel’s wars. “But we did not win the greatest victory that we aspired to: release from the need to win victories.”

Jewish Press Staff

President Reuven Rivlin’s eulogy at the funeral of Israel’s Ninth President Shimon Peres

Friday, September 30th, 2016

“Laugh and play with my dreams, I am the dreamer who wanders. Play because in man I will believe, and I still believe in you.” So wrote the poet Shaul Tchernichovsky, and so you played, our dear President, during the uplifting moments of elation, in times of difficulty and crisis, and with the small joys of day-to-day life, “because in man I will believe, and I still believe in you.”

I am speaking to you today for the final time Shimon, “as one President to another”, as you would say each time you called to offer strength and good advice. As I speak, my eyes search for you, our dear brother, our older brother, and you are not there. Today you are gathered to your forefathers in the land which you loved so, but your dreams remain, and your beliefs uninterred. As one man you carried an entire nation on the wings of imagination, on the wings of vision. The “Brave son”, was the pseudonym you chose as a youth, as the name of Isaiah the Prophet, a visionary. Yet, you were not only a man of vision, you were a man of deeds. Like you, I was also born into the Zionist Movement in those decisive years between vision and fulfillment. I was fortunate to look up to you as a partner in the building of the State of Israel from its very foundations. For both of us, the State of Israel could never be taken for granted. However, with much thanks to you Shimon, for our sons and daughters, for our friends – and yes for our opponents – the State of Israel is an indisputable fact.

You had the rare ability, Shimon, to conceive what seemed to be the inconceivable, and see it to fruition. Your eyes saw far ahead, while your feet covered great distances on the landscape of Jewish and Zionist history. You always walked onward and upward, as a skilled mountaineer who secures his hook before ascending ever higher to the peak. This is how you lived your life. At first you would dream, and only when in your mind’s eye could you truly see the State of Israel reaching new heights, would you then begin to climb, and take us all with you towards the new goal. You succeeded in moving even the most stubborn of politicians, and to melt away even the hardest of hearts of our opponents. You strived until your final breaths to reach the pinnacle of the Zionist dream: an independent, sovereign state, existing in peace with our neighbors. Yet you also knew that true peace could only be achieved from a position of strength, and you were sure to secure the path to this goal. Few among us understand, and much more will be written about how many mountains you moved, from the days of the State’s establishment and till today in order to ensure our security and our military qualitative edge. How deep was your belief in the sacred combination of ethical leadership and military prowess, that Israel must act not just with wisdom, but with justice, faithful at every moment to its values as a Jewish and democratic state, democratic and Jewish.

My dear Shimon, you were the only one in the history of the State of Israel to serve in the three most senior positions in government: Foreign Minister, Defense Minister, and Finance Minister. You are the only one to have served as Prime Minister and as President. It is no exaggeration to say that: more than you were blessed to be President of this great nation, this nation was blessed to have you as its President. In all these roles you were our head, but even more so, my dear friend, you were our heart; a heart that loved the people, the land, and the State. A heart which loved each and every person, a heart which cared for them.

Your stubborn faith in mankind and the good of people – in the victory of progress over ignorance, in the victory of hope over fear – was your eternal fountain of youth, thanks to which you were the eternal fountain of youth for all of us. The man of whom we thought time could never stop. With all your love for history and tremendous knowledge of history, you despised wallowing in the past, or being entrenched in a sense of self justice at the cost of the possibilities and opportunities that tomorrow brings. “The future is more important than the past” you said. “What happened yesterday does not interest me, only tomorrow does,” you would say. The love you received, which transcended political divides in the later years of your life – from your supporters and opponents – was an expression of the yearning of all us to be infected by your unequivocal optimism. Even when we did not agree with you we wanted to believe that perhaps you were right. Believe me, it was not easy to refuse your optimism, and at times your innocence.

Who more than you knew the heavy price of innocence, and yet, who more than you believed that heavier still was the price of mediocrity and being of little faith?

Shimon, I unashamedly confess, on the eve of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, at your graveside among the graves of the leaders of our nation, also your forgiveness must be asked. We will ask your forgiveness. It was permitted to disagree with you. Your opponents had a duty to express their opinion. However, there were years in which red lines were crossed between ideological disputes and words and deeds which had no place. You always acted according to what you believed with all you heart was best for the people, whom you served.

As President, you were for us an honest advocate. You taught many around the world to love the State of Israel, and you taught us to love ourselves, not to speak ill, and see the good and the beautiful in everything.

This is a sad day, Shimon, this is a sad day. The journey of your dreams which began in Vishnyeva, comes to its end in Jerusalem our capital, which is also a dream which became a reality. Your death is a great personal and national loss, as it is also the end on an era, the end of the era of giants whose lives’ stories are the stories of the Zionist movement and the State of Israel. This is our profound feeling today. A feeling of the end of an era in the nation’s life, the end of a chapter in our lives. Our farewell to you is also a farewell to us from ourselves. When we see world leaders – our friends from near and far – who have come here to bid you their final respects, we understand that not only here but across the world you will be missed. And all of us already miss you. Farewell Shimon. The man whose ‘ways are pleasant, and all of his paths peaceful’. Rest in peace, and act (in Heaven) as an honest advocate for the people of Israel whom you loved so. “Because my soul aspires for freedom, I did not sell her for a golden calf. Because I will also believe in man, in his spirit, his spirit of strength.” Farewell Mr. President.

Jewish Press Staff

Updated Ceremony and Traffic Details for Funeral of Israel’s Ninth President Shimon Peres

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

Following are preliminary details regarding coverage for the funeral of Israel’s ninth president, Shimon Peres.


From 7:30 AM – 9:00 AM on Friday, Highway 1 will be shut down in both directions.

From 12:30 PM – 2:00 P:M on Friday, Highway 1 will be shut down in both directions.

Roads leading to Highway 1 will be closed. Expect heavy traffic on roads 6, 431, 38, and 443 during those hours.

The police ask that drivers try to avoid these roads today and tomorrow.

Live broadcasts on all media (television, radio and Internet) will be provided from three locations: Ben-Gurion International Airport during the arrival of the delegations, the Knesset on Thursday, the laying of wreaths by heads of state, and on Mt. Herzl Friday, from 9 AM – 1 AM to cover the eulogies and the funeral ceremony. The live broadcasts will be available on the GPO website and Facebook page.

Roads around the Knesset will be closed starting Thursday; the roads around Mt. Herzl are due to be closed from Friday morning until the conclusion of the funeral.

The public will be able to pay their respects before the coffin at the Knesset on Thursday from 9 Am – 9 PM (or as necessary).

Street closings and transportation to the Knesset

From 8 AM Thursday, all routes leading to the Knesset plaza will be closed to traffic: Eliezer Kaplan Street, Yoel Zusman Street and Road #16 which encompasses the Knesset. These routes will be closed until after the funeral procession has left for Mt. Herzl on Friday.

Members of the public who wish to pay their respects before the coffin are requested to use the free parking lots from which they will be able to travel to the Knesset via shuttles. Parking lots in Jerusalem: Railway Station, Teddy Station, Ammunition Hill and Ein Yael-Jerusalem Zoo. Parking lots outside Jerusalem: Latrun and Modi’in Park & Ride.

Mt. Herzl area street closings

From 7 AM Friday, all routes leading to Mt. Herzl will be closed to traffic: Derech Mordechai Ish Shalom, Yehoshua Farbstein Street, Herzl Boulevard from Chords Bridge junction to Holland Square, Shmuel Beyth Street in the direction toward Mt. Herzl, Bayit Vagan Street and HaZikaron Street. Streets from the hotels to Mt. Herzl: Gershon Agron Street, Ramban Street, Hecht, Herzl.

Vehicles parked on these routes will be towed.

The roads will be opened following the conclusion of the funeral and the dispersal of those in attendance.

The schedule for the Mt. Herzl funeral on Friday

9:30 – 11 AM – Eulogies at Herzl’s Tomb Plaza

11 AM – 12 PM – Moving of the coffin, Peres family and VIPs to the graveside, Great Leaders of the Nation section.

12 – 12:30 PM – Interment ceremony.

David Israel

As 5777 Rolls In, Israel’s Population at 8.585 Million

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

On the eve of the Jewish new year 5777, Israel’s population is estimated at 8.585 million, not including about 183 thousand foreign residents, according to a statement released Tuesday by the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics.

The Jewish population of Israel has reached about 6.419 million, constituting 74.8% of the overall population.

The Arab population is 1.786 million, or 20.8% of the overall population.

Non-Arab Christians, as well as members of other religions and individuals without religious affiliation are estimated at 380 thousand, about 4.4% of the overall population.

Since last Rosh Hashanah, Israel’s population has grown by about 172,000. The rate of growth remained at 2%, similar to previous years.

About 189 thousand babies were born in Israel in 5776, and an estimated 46 thousand passed away.

Some 30 thousand were added to the immigration balance, 25 thousand out of them new olim.

It should be noted that 5776 was a leap year, with 13 lunar months, or 385 days.


Israel’s 9th President Shimon Peres Dead at 93

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Shimon Peres, Israel’s ninth President, former Prime Minister, Nobel Prize winner, who served for nearly five decades as a member of the Knesset, passed away on Wednesday morning at age 93, following a severe stroke. He will be buried in a state funeral in the plot on Mt. Herzl dedicated to the nation’s great leaders. Peres was married to the late Sonia Peres who died in 2011. They had three children: Tsvia Walden, Yonatan (Yoni) Peres, and Nehemia (Chemi) Peres.

Peres was born on August 2, 1923 as Shimon Perski (a relative of Lauren Bacall a.k.a. Joan Persky), in Wiszniew, Poland (now Vishnyeva, Belarus). In 1934, together with his mother Sara and younger brother Gershon, they followed his father, who made aliyah in 1932. Peres grew up in Tel Aviv and studied at the Ben Shemen agricultural school. He met Sonia in Ben Shemen and they got married in 1945.

Peres became active in the Socialist youth movement Hanoar Haoved and in 1947 was recruited by Levy Eshkol to serve in the Hagana underground headquarters, alongside Eshkol and David Ben-Gurion. In 1953, after a stint as head of naval services in the newly formed IDF, Peres was appointed (at age 29) as Director of the Defense Ministry by Ben-Gurion.

His mission, and greatest achievement as head of Israel’s fledgling defense apparatus, was to turn Israel into a nuclear power. Peres began negotiations with the French in October 1956, during the Sinai War, which was a collaboration of Israel, France and Great Britain to take over the Suez Canal from the revolutionary government in Cairo. Peres stressed Israel’s loyalty to France and the fact that a strong Israel is vital to the French national interest, seeing as the Egyptians were supporting the Algerian FLN underground whose aim was to expel the French from North Africa.

According to Peres’ biographer Michael Bar Zohar, the birth of the Dimona nuclear plant was an exciting tale of intrigue, as the promise to provide the technology was made by French Defense Minister Maurice Bourgès-Maunoury, but on the date set for signing the secret deal, the French government collapsed in the National Assembly. Peres was waiting for Bourgès in his chambers with a bottle of whisky, only to discover that his host was out of office and that his likely successor, Gen. Charles de Gaulle, objected to spreading French nuclear know-how. Peres took advantage of the fact that Bourgès would on occasion tell his wife that he was in a meeting with the Israeli visitor when he was actually meeting with his lover, and demanded to cash his chips with the fallen politician. They agreed to backdate the agreement to the day before, when Bourgès still had the authority to sign it. The Frenchman said “D’accord” and the deal to set Israel up as the sole nuclear power in the Middle East was signed — fraudulently.

In 1959, Peres was elected to the Knesset as member of the ruling Mapai Party, and continued to serve as MK and in various ministerial positions, including as prime minister, almost uninterruptedly for 48 years. In 1965, Peres followed his mentor Ben-Gurion out of Mapai, and formed, together with former Chief of Staff Moshe Dayan, the Rafi party. After the 1967 war, an alignment of Mapai, Rafi and Ahdut Haavoda formed the Israel Labor Party, now also known as the Zionist Camp.

In 1973, after the Yom Kippur war which created a wave of anti-Labor sentiment in the public at large, and following the resignation of Prime Minister Golda Meir and Defense Minister Dayan, only two labor senior politicians retained their public prestige: Shimon Peres and former Chief of Staff and Ambassador to the US Yizhak Rabin. Rabin won and went on to become prime minister, with Peres as his defense minister, and their campaign for the leadership of Labor started two decades of enmity combined with forced cooperation which culminated in Peres eventually presenting to Rabin the Oslo agreements as an almost fait accompli.

In 1976, as defense minister, Peres was responsible for the Antebe Operation. Meanwhile, his disagreements with Rabin led to the latter’s resignation and the 1977 elections that, for the first time in Israel’s history, placed Likud’s Menahem Begin at the country’s helm. In the 1980s, as Labor’s leader, Peres failed to gain a resounding victory over his rightwing foes, and ended up in a coalition government with Likud in which he and Yitzhak Shamir rotated in the role of prime minister. While serving as Shamir’s foreign minister, Peres launched the London Agreement, a precursor of the Oslo Accord, which was torpedoed by Shamir.

In 1992, with Rabin once again the leader, Labor won the elections and formed a narrow, leftwing coalition government that relied on the Arab votes in the Knesset. Peres and his emissary Dr. Yossi Beilin began secret, illegal negotiations with the PLO, which resulted in the August 20, 1993 Oslo deal. The agreement, which resuscitated a dying PLO and gave it dominion over the Gaza Strip, Judea and Samaria, resulted, as many had predicted, in rivers of blood, as the Arabs residing in the newly formed Palestinian Authority launched a campaign of bombing and shooting attacks against Israeli civilian centers. In 1995, on the eve of the next elections, Prime Minister Rabin was assassinated and replaced by Peres.

In 1996 Peres lost his final bid for sole possession of the Prime Minister’s office when he lost the election to newcomer Benjamin Netanyahu. The televised debate between them showed the nation a tired, old political hack versus a youthful and well spoken leader. Netanyahu succeeded in forming his first coalition government despite the fact that his party had won by a mere 30,000 votes.

At that point, possibly the lowest in his political life, Shimon Peres reinvented himself and began the next phase in his career, as statesman inspiring an entire world. He founded the Peres Center for Peace, and although he continued to serve in the Knesset and was member of Ehud Barak’s security cabinet, his goals have changed. In 2005 Peres resigned from the Labor party to join Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s government, to support the second assault on Jewish life in the 1967 liberated territories: the expulsion of the Jews of Gush Katif. His reward was his election by the Knesset to be Israel’s ninth president in 2007. He gained 58 out of the 120 MK votes in the first round (38 voted for Reuven Rivlin, 21 for Colette Avital). His opponents then threw their support to Peres in the second round and he received 86 votes, with 23 objections.

He spent his seven years in office in an indefatigable global activity, attending conferences, giving speeches around the planet, meeting world leaders and becoming synonymous with the image of Israel’s future as drawn by Israel’s leftwing. He maintained his rigorous schedule after the end of his term in 2014, until, two weeks ago, his body succumbed to a stroke.

His death marks the end of Israel’s generation of founding politicians. He will be remembered for his great contribution to the Jewish State’s military supremacy in the Middle East, but also for his grave mistakes in acting to reverse the same state’s remarkable territorial gains of 1967. May his memory be blessed.


Man Shouting ‘Allahu Akbar’ Shot Outside Israel’s Embassy in Turkey [video]

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

A man brandishing a knife and shouting “Allahu Akbar” was shot by police as he was storming the Israeli embassy in Ankara, Turkey Wednesday afternoon, an Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman and Turkish police said in a statement. Turkish police told Reuters that the attacker shouted “Allahu Akbar” as he was rushing the embassy before being shot in the leg.

“The staff is safe,” said the statement, “The attacker was wounded before he reached the embassy. The assailant was shot and wounded by a local security man.”

The area outside the embassy was cordoned off and Police examined the bag the attacker was carrying and it either did not contain explosives, or the explosives were not activated, according to Reuters.

CNN’s Turkish channel reported the man had attempted to stab embassy personnel before being shot in the leg, and appeared mentally unstable. Turkish NTV reported two assailants had tried to storm the embassy.

David Israel

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/man-shouting-allahu-akbar-shot-outside-israels-embassy-in-turkey-video/2016/09/21/

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