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December 9, 2016 / 9 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Kibbutz.’

A First: Kibbutzniks to Pay Personal Income Tax

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Individual kibbutz members will be required to pay a 25% personal income tax as well as the Social Security Healthcare tax starting next January, according to a move by the Finance Ministry, Israel Hayom reported Thursday. The new taxes are expected to enrich the Finance coffers by close to $80 million annually, and the Social Security income by about $50 million.

Since the beginning of communal history, each kibbutz used to pay a corporate tax for all the members, and even after the change in taxation kibbutz members without outside income will not be required to file individually. But over the past few decades many kibbutz members have been working off the kibbutz grounds, contributing a portion of their income to the cooperative — and the Israeli tax authority would like to take a peek at those monies.

The Finance Ministry’s new rule must still go through the Knesset Finance Committee for approval, and the agricultural lobby is expected to put up a hard fight against the changes.

Amitai Porat, the Religious Kibbutz Movement Secretary General, and Nir Meir, the Kibbutz Movement Secretary General, on Wednesday wrote Prime Minister Netanyahu requesting that he halt Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon’s proposed changes in the tax code regarding kibbutzim. They told the PM that “Minister Kahlon is not interested in meeting us to find a solution that would make it possible to reexamine the tax code while maintaining and protecting the kibbutz character and the communal life in which we believe.”

David Israel

UPDATE: Gaza Qassam Rocket Badly Damages Sderot Kindergarten

Saturday, July 2nd, 2016

A Sderot kindergarten building was badly damaged and two Israelis were treated for shock late Friday night after Gaza terrorists launched a Qassam rocket attack at the southern Israeli city.

About 15 seconds after residents were awakened by the wail of the Red Alert rocket alert, the “boom!” that comes with a rocket impact was heard — and felt — in the Gaza Belt city.

Families in Sderot and the Sha’ar Hanegev Regional Council district, and in Sapir College were forced to “wake up and run” for safe spaces late Friday night when the siren activated at 11 pm.

The rocket landed just a few seconds later.

Although religious observant families were wrapping up the Sabbath night meals and getting ready for bed at the time, many other secular Jews with young children were already fast asleep. Parents were forced to tear their children from beds to make a run for the bomb shelters — an exercise that has become second nature to many, and which triggers a flood of fear in too many more.

The kindergarten building that sustained a direct hit — badly damaged — was empty at the time, and no one was physically injured in the attack.

But medics from the Magen David Adom emergency medical response service treated two people who were near the impact site, both for shock.

Police units were deployed to the scene.

At the time of this writing — prior to the start of the Sabbath in New York — officers were ordered to remain on site.

damaged kindergarten in Sderot

Hana Levi Julian

New Military Watchtowers Dot Lebanese Side of Israel’s Northern Border

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

Northern Israeli residents are worried about new observation posts built by the Lebanese Army which have sprung up along the border. In Lebanon, to speak of the Lebanese Army in many ways is also to speak of Iran’s proxy group, Hezbollah.

The group has grown from a terrorist organization into a powerful guerrilla military force trained, equipped and funded by Iran. It fields cabinet ministers and parliamentarians from a mammoth political machine that has prevented the country from electing a new president for more than a year.

Although built by the Lebanese Army it is clear the new watchtowers, situated on the Lebanese side of the border, can see into Israeli towns and kibbutzim as well as Israeli military bases on behalf of Hezbollah — if not with its own personnel.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1701 – the cease-fire agreement that ended the 2006 Second Lebanon War – prohibits weaponry in this area, which is supposed to be a demilitarized zone.

The watchtowers provide a bird’s eye view of what is happening in Israel’s military and civilian fields and roads as well. But the Israeli army is monitoring the situation, according to the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit. “There is no change in the security situation,” said a military spokesperson on Monday (May 23).

It took barely a month to build the towers, according to a resident of Moshav Zar’it who spoke with Ynet and who said three such watchtowers are within sight of nearby Kibbutz Admit.

Another overlooks Kibbutz Hanita, according to security coordinator Erez Adar, who told Ynet the structure is less than a third of a mile away. “We are worried about getting shot at from the tower as it’s so close.

“While the Lebanese Army may be the ones in the tower for now, it’s clear that during the next war, these positions will be manned by Hezbollah.”

Hana Levi Julian

Israeli Farmers Return to Work in Fields on Gaza Border

Sunday, May 8th, 2016

Israeli farmers in the Gaza Belt region were allowed to go back to working their fields near the southern border on Sunday.

Security officials said they don’t believe Gaza’s ruling Hamas terrorist organization is seeking an escalation in tensions with Israel at this time, according to a report on Channel 10 television news.

Sources said it is believed a smaller terrorist group was responsible for the rocket attack that was fired at southern Israeli communities over the weekend.

Nevertheless, the IDF is continuing its search for cross-border terror attack tunnels along the Gaza border.

Since the start of those operations, two tunnels leading from Gaza into Israeli territory have been uncovered.

Hana Levi Julian

New Book: Bernie Sanders Was Kicked Off Vermont Commune for Loafing

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

When presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders was young and still had all his hair, he was kicked out of a hippie commune in Vermont in 1971 because he was “sitting around and talking” politics instead of working, according to a new book that’s mostly about the kids who did all the working.

We Are As Gods: Back to the Land in the 1970s on the Quest for a New America,” by Kate Daloz, scheduled to be released April 26, tells the story of Loraine, Craig, Pancake, Hershe, and a dozen of their friends, who came into possession of 116 acres, Myrtle Hill Farm, in northeast Vermont, and decided to “grow their own food, build their own shelter, and create an enlightened community. They had little idea that at the same moment, all over the country, a million other young people were making the same move—back to the land.”

Daloz grew up next door to the hippie farm about which she reports, in a geodesic dome (a spherical or hemispherical thin-shell structure that was popular in the 1960s).

Bernie Sanders, 30, came to Myrtle Hill in the summer of 1971, at about the same time he became active in the socialist Liberty Union Party. He was there in the middle of researching an article on natural childbirth for Movement, Liberty Union’s newspaper. According to Deloz, “Many elements of Western medicine came under suspicion during this period, but none more so than modern obstetrics.”

Other than working on his article, which involved interviewing a pregnant member of the commune, Sanders spent his time at Myrtle Hill in “endless political discussion,” Deloz reports. This did not go over well with the rest of the hippies, who were working the land the way folks used to do in Colonial Vermont, which meant enduring long hours of backbreaking labor. According to Daloz, one of the commune members, Craig, “resented feeling like he had to pull others out of Bernie’s orbit if any work was going to get accomplished that day.”

In the end, Sanders was told he was no longer welcome. “When Bernie had stayed for Myrtle’s allotted three days, Craig politely requested that he move on,” Daloz reports.

The topics Bernie liked to discuss with the real workers, included, according to Deloz, “a kibbutz-style school for commune children; the possibility of a coming violent revolution; and the pros and cons of group marriage.” So he picked up a thing or two back in 1963, in kibbutz Sha’arei Ha’amakim not far from Haifa.

The Myrtle Hill commune broke up in the 1980s, a victim of the War on Drugs. They grew marijuana on the grounds, to supplement their income, and law enforcement raided them. According to police reports, they found a quarter million dollars of marijuana and “a bullet-proof vest, a machete, a gas mask, and a fully loaded Uzi.” So some Israeli flavor lingered even after Bernie had been ousted.

JNi.Media

600 Million Israel Spiders Attack Enemies of S. American Crops

Tuesday, November 24th, 2015

 

Israel is on the attack, but this time it is with kibbutz spiders grown as a natural pesticide to fight enemies of crops in Colombia, Globes reported.

The carnivorous spiders are grown in the Bio-Bee laboratories at Sde Eliyahu, a national religious kibbutz located in the Jordan Valley, approximately five miles south of Beit Shean and near the border with Jordan.

It has grown spiders that will be flown to Colombia and multiply to 600 million to eat up spiders half their size. They are kept refrigerated and then reproduce after being released in warm air at their destination.

The kibbutz spiders chase after the smaller enemy, hunt it down and then suck it dry.

Bio-Bee is looking forward to marketing the natural pesticide to replace chemicals.

Sde Eliyahu says the carnivorous spiders are expensive to grow. It takes only a week from incubation to reach the adult stage, but they fetch a price of tens of thousands of dollars and ounce.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Kibbutz Managers to Visit Jordan, Explore Alternatives to Israel’s Strike-Ridden Ports

Sunday, November 1st, 2015

(JNi.media) A group of dozens of managers of kibbutz industry enterprises will tour and meet with the leaders of the special economic zone of the city of Aqaba, Jordan, to familiarize themselves with the region and with the Jordanian economy, and to examine the possibilities for cooperation and establishing joint production lines.

Aqaba is Jordan’s only coastal city, on the shores of the Red Sea, across the bay from Israel’s tourism Mecca, Eilat. It boasts a population of 140,000 on a 144.8 square mile area. The city’s strategic location at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea has made its port a valuable asset to this day, and it serves several countries in the region.

In the last decade the kibbutz industrial enterprises have expanded production activity abroad and have become the main growth driver for the kibbutzim. The volume of production in kibbutz-owned plants outside Israel today is estimated at about $2.3 billion annually. According to Kibbutz Industries Association CEO Udi Orenstein, expanding operations abroad is an inevitable part of globalization but, production within Israel could be increased as well with a proper investment policy and the regulation the Israeli seaports—as in eliminating those frequent longshoremen’s strikes.

That last comment represents a remarkable shift in Israeli society, coming as it does from the leader of a major kibbutz enterprise. For a leader of an originally socialist, largely agricultural settlements enterprise to voice this jaundiced view of harbor workers’ frequent job disputes, resulting in frequent wildcat and longer strikes, speaks volumes of the new Israel.

The kibbutz industry tour, to begin Wednesday, November 11, will include a visit to the modern industrial area located north of Aqaba, the local air and sea ports, and discussions with local entrepreneurs.

Orenstein said in a statement that “the global economic changes require that industry constantly explore new possibilities. Aqaba is in the midst of a tremendous development drive, and functions as a special economic zone with special tax laws and planning, and can offer us advanced logistical options for exports abroad as well as shared production.”

A.D. Gordon (1856 – 1922), the spiritual force behind Labor Zionism is probably rolling in his grave.

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/kibbutz-managers-to-visit-jordan-explore-alternatives-to-israels-strike-ridden-ports/2015/11/01/

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