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October 27, 2016 / 25 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘star’

Tamar Yonah Show – Nibiru: Will this Dwarf Star Wreak Havoc on Earth? [audio]

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

What is Nibiru? What is planet X? When do people think it will hit or affect earth? What is the best thing to do to prepare and be ready IF this should happen? …and are we in the End-Times written about in the Bible?

Join Tamar Yonah as she speaks with Rabbi Alon Anava from AlonAnava.com and Atzmut.com as he talks about Armageddon and Redemption. Which will it be, and how might it happen? This is a DON’T MISS show! PLUS: Read an article entitled: Nibiru: How to Survive the Coming World Disaster Now

Tamar Yonah Show 20Sept2016

Israel News Talk Radio

Steven Hill, Star of ‘Law & Order,’ ‘Mission: Impossible,’ Dead at 94

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Steven Hill, who starred in “Mission: Impossible” as the versatile team’s leader Daniel Briggs, and as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order,” died Tuesday at age 94. He was born Solomon Krakovsky, to Russian Jewish immigrants in Seattle, Washington.

Hill only lasted one season on “Mission: Impossible,” and was replaced by Peter Graves, for being “difficult to work with,” most notably since he refused to work late on Fridays, because of his Shabbat observance. His fellow Jewish cast member Martin Landau described Hill’s only season saying, “I felt he was digging his own grave.”

Hill was apparently less difficult to work with on the set of the long-running series “Law & Order,” whose producer Dick Wolf released a statement following Hill’s passing, saying, “Steven was not only one of the truly great actors of his generation, he was one of the most intelligent people I have ever met. He is also the only actor I’ve known who consistently tried to cut his own lines.”

In a 1996 interview, Dick Wolf called Hill “the Talmudic influence on the entire zeitgeist of the series,” saying “Steven has more moral authority than anyone else on episodic TV.”

Hill’s first Broadway stage appearance was alongside Marlon Brando in Ben Hecht’s “A Flag Is Born,” in 1946. His big break came when he got a small part in the hit Broadway show Mister Roberts. “The director, Joshua Logan, thought I had some ability, and he let me create one of the scenes,” Hill told the NY Times. “So, I improvised dialog and it went in the show. That was my first endorsement. It gave me tremendous encouragement to stay in the business.”

After being dropped from “Mission: Impossible,” Hill spent 10 years of what he described as “tremendous periods of unemployment.” He left acting in 1967 and moved to a Jewish community in Rockland County, NY, where he wrote at night and sold real estate by day. After 10 years, he was ready to act again. He returned to work in the 1980s and 1990s, playing parental and authority-figure roles in Yentl (1983), Garbo Talks (1984), Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs (1983), Heartburn (1986), Raw Deal (1986), Running on Empty (1988), Billy Bathgate (1991), and The Firm (1993).

Hill’s role as New York District Attorney Bower in Legal Eagles (1986), foreshadowed his role of Adam Schiff in Law & Order. He modeled these roles on Manhattan District Attorney Robert M. Morgenthau, who served from 1990 to 2000. When Morgenthau found out that Hill was making $25,000 per episode, he told him, “Steven, when you’re ready to retire, let me know. I want your job.”

David Israel

Jewish Actor Fyvush Finkel, 93, Passes Away

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

The actor Philip “Fyvush” Finkel passed away on Saturday (August 14) in Manhattan at the age of 93. He was born at home in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn, New York to Jewish immigrant parents from Minsk, Belarus and Warsaw. The name “Fyvush” was later adopted as a stage name.

He made his Broadway theater debut in the original 1964 production of Fiddler, and later played Lazar Wolf, the Butcher, in the limited run of the 1981 Broadway revival of the same musical. Eventually he played the lead role of Tevye the Milkman for years in the national touring company.

The Emmy Award winner had spent nearly his entire life entertaining others, having started on the stage at age nine.

He was best known for his roles in Boston Public and Picket Fences, but those who flocked to the theater in 1964 might remember him in Fiddler on the Roof, when he played Mordcha, the Innkeeper.

At the age of 75, Finkel was awarded a star with his name on it on the Yiddish Theater Walk of Fame outside the Second Avenue Deli in Manhattan.

On the silver screen, Finkel appeared in Brighton Beach Memoirs, For Love or Money and Nixon. He also appeared in a remake of Fantasy Island on television.

Finkel’s wife Trudi Lieberman passed away in 2008 after 61 years of marriage. The actor is survived by two sons: Ian, a music arranger and xylophone virtuoso, and Elliot, a concert pianist.

Baruch Dayan HoEmes.

Hana Levi Julian

Parents of Russian-Jewish Star Trek Actor Sue Fiat Chrysler for Son’s Death

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

The family of 27-year-old Russian-Jewish actor Anton Yelchin has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV over the death of their loved one, according to Business Insider.

Yelchin’s parents are charging the company with negligence and product liability after their son’s Jeep Grand Cherokee rolled backwards and killed the actor on June 19, crushing him to death against a brick wall and fence at his home in Los Angeles.

The vehicle was covered under a recall in April of more than 1.1 million cars and SUVs by the company, in the wake of at least 68 injuries, 266 crashes and 308 reports of property damage. The recall applies to the 2014-2015 model years of the Jeep Grand Cherokee sport utility vehicle and 2012-2014 Dodge Charger and Chrysler 300 sedans.

A recall letter sent to Anton Yelchin but it was received seven days after his death, according to Gary Dordick, the attorney representing Irina and Victor Yelchin (the actor’s parents).

“Your vehicle may roll away, striking and injuring you, your passengers, or bystanders, if the vehicle’s engine is left running, the parking brake is not engaged, and the transmission is not in the “PARK” position before exiting the vehicle,” the letter stated in part.

Irina and Victor Yelchin were renowned skaters in the former Soviet Union. Their son Anton most recently played the role of the young navigator Chekov on the starship Enterprise in the newest ‘Star Trek’ movie, ‘Beyond.’

Hana Levi Julian

Trump Pulls Star of David from Anti-Clinton Image

Saturday, July 2nd, 2016

Donald Trump was criticized Saturday for combining a popular Jewish symbol with an attack on Hillary Clinton, who is, apparently, the “Most corrupt candidate ever!” which is a tall order indeed, considering who has run for the highest post in the land over the centuries. Still, the image featured a six-pointed star, or, let’s have the courage to say it, a Star of David, against a background of heaps of cash which, if we didn’t know better, would have brought to mind some classic anti-Semitic imageries.

The rebukes arrived on schedule, with leftwing columnist Ana Marie Cox tweeting that the “Symbolism here is pretty… unsubtle.”

The Trump campaign did not release a statement to explain the offensive tweeted image, but shortly thereafter released an almost identical image with a circle where the Jewish symbol used to be. So now it’s time for circle Americans to take offense.


‘It Can Be Done’: the Rosh Hashana 1943 Escape of Danish Jews

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

As the final minutes of Rosh Hashanah ticked away, 13-year-old Leo Goldberger was hiding, along with his parents and three brothers, in the thick brush along the shore of Dragor, a small fishing village south of Copenhagen. The year was 1943, and the Goldbergers, like thousands of other Danish Jews, were desperately trying to escape an imminent Nazi roundup.

“Finally, after what seemed like an excruciatingly long wait, we saw our signal offshore,” Goldberger later recalled. His family “strode straight into the ocean and waded through three or four feet of icy water until we were hauled aboard a fishing boat” and covered themselves “with smelly canvases.” Shivering and frightened, but grateful, the Goldberger family soon found itself in the safety and freedom of neighboring Sweden.

For years, Allied leaders had insisted that nothing could be done to rescue Jews from the Nazis except to win the war. But in one extraordinary night, seventy years ago next month, the Danish people exploded that myth and changed history.

When the Nazis occupied Denmark during the Holocaust in 1940, the Danes put up little resistance. As a result, the German authorities agreed to let the Danish government continue functioning with greater autonomy than other occupied countries. They also postponed taking steps against Denmark’s 8,000 Jewish citizens.

In the late summer of 1943, amid rising tensions between the occupation regime and the Danish government, the Nazis declared martial law and decided the time had come to deport Danish Jews to the death camps. But Georg Duckwitz, a German diplomat in Denmark, leaked the information to Danish friends. Duckwitz was later honored by Yad Vashem as one of the Righteous Among the Nations. As word of the Germans’ plans spread, the Danish public responded with a spontaneous nationwide grassroots effort to help the Jews.

The Danes’ remarkable response gave rise to the legend that King Christian X himself rode through the streets of Copenhagen on horseback, wearing a yellow Star of David, and that the citizens of the city likewise donned the star in solidarity with the Jews.

The story may have had its origins in a political cartoon that appeared in a Swedish newspaper in 1942. It showed King Christian pointing to a Star of David and declaring that if the Nazis imposed it upon the Jews of Demark, “then we must all wear the star.” Leon Uris’s novel Exodus, and the movie based on that book, helped spread the legend. But subsequent investigations by historians have concluded that the story is a myth.

On Rosh Hashanah – which fell on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 in 1943 – and the days that followed, numerous Danish Christian families hid Jews in their homes or farms, and then smuggled them to the seashore late at night. From there, fishermen took them across the Kattegat Straits to neighboring Sweden.

The three-week operation had the strong support of Danish church leaders, who used their pulpits to urge aid to the Jews, as well as Danish universities, which shut down so that students could assist the smugglers. More than 7,000 Danish Jews reached Sweden and were sheltered there until the end of the war.

Esther Finkler, a young newlywed, was hidden, together with her husband and their mothers, in a greenhouse.

“At night, we saw the [German] searchlights sweeping back and forth throughout the neighborhood” as the Nazis hunted for Jews, Esther later recalled. One evening, a member of the Danish Underground arrived and drove the four “through streets saturated with Nazi stormtroopers” to a point near the shore.

There they hid in an underground shelter, and then in the attic of a bakery, until finally they were brought to a beach, where they boarded a small fishing vessel together with other Jewish refugees.

“There were nine of us, lying down on the deck or the floor,” Esther said. “The captain covered us with fishing nets. When everyone had been properly concealed, the fishermen started the boat, and as the motor started to run, so did my pent-up tears.”

Then, suddenly, trouble. “The captain began to sing and whistle nonchalantly, which puzzled us. Soon we heard him shouting in German toward a passing Nazi patrol boat: ‘Wollen sie einen beer haben?’ (Would you like a beer?) – a clever gimmick designed to avoid the Germans’ suspicions. After three tense hours at sea, we heard shouting: ‘Get up! Get up! And welcome to Sweden!’ It was hard to believe, but we were now safe. We cried and the Swedes cried with us as they escorted as ashore. The nightmare was over,” Esther recalled.

Dr. Rafael Medoff

Broward Chabad’s Chanukah Celebration/33rd Birthday

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

The 33rd annual South Florida Chassidic Chanukah Festival is getting bigger and better. Over 10,000 people have attended the event since it was moved to Gulfstream Park in Hallandale Beach in 2007, and the upcoming festival set for Thursday, December 13, will include a star-studded show that is guaranteed to attract the largest attendance yet.

The festival (at Gulfstream Park, US1 and Hallandale Beach Blvd.) is produced and directed by Chabad of South Broward, leaders in Jewish education, social services and community outreach.

The festival will be preceded by a 100-car menorah parade, starting out from the Yeshivah Gedolah of Greater Miami, under the auspices of Florida Friends of Lubavitch.

Other festival highlights will include music by 8th Day brothers Shmuel and Bentzion Marcus; the lighting of Florida’s largest menorah led by Cantor Rabbi Yossy Lebovics, a large lineup of community leaders and dignitaries, free Chanukah gelt and goodies for the thousands of children in attendance, as well as a delicious dinner (for a nominal fee) and scores of valuable prizes.

Rabbi Levi Tennenhaus, the event’s coordinator and Chabad’s program director, encourages those who can afford it to get reserved seating, “The event, as always, is free. However, in addition to our major sponsors, individuals are entitled to reserve VIP seats for $100 per seat. This will help both the festival, which runs at an enormous cost as a service to the community, and individuals who want the luxury and convenience to sit up front with their seats reserved exclusively for them and their families.” Corporate sponsors include Gulfstream Park and Casino, and Kosher Central. The event will be broadcast live around the world courtesy of Chabad.org.

Chanukah marks the birthday of Chabad of South Broward. The first Chabad Center in Broward County. It sponsors over forty programs and institutions throughout Broward County, including Project PRIDE, a non-sectarian drug prevention and education program; The Friendship Circle, an incredible interactive program for children with special needs; Florida’s only teachers seminary for women; the fast-growing CHAI TOTS preschool and Hebrew Club; bar and bat mitzvah clubs, CTEEN Club; three mikvehs accessible to the physically challenged; Camp Gan Israel; kollel for businessmen and professionals, and twelve synagogues.

For more festival information, or to reserve VIP and box seats, call 954-458-1877; e-mail levi@chanukahfestival.com; or log on to www.chanukahfestival.com.

Shelley Benveniste

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/south-florida/broward-chabads-chanukah-celebration33rd-birthday/2012/11/21/

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