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November 27, 2014 / 5 Kislev, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Jewish.’

Honey Sales Expected to Soar as Rosh Hashanah Approaches

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

Honey cake, gourmet honey, flavored honey, and honey as a recipe in chicken, and even fish, are all expected to contribute to soaring sales of honey this Rosh Hashanah and holiday season.

Ironically, the US Department of Agriculture is conducting hearings to define honey or just how much honey is required to qualify for “pure honey.”

In 2006, members of the honey producing, packing, and importing industries petitioned the FDA to develop a standard of identity for honey. The petitioners stated that “a compositional standard for honey will serve as a tool to help combat the economic adulteration of honey.”

In California, a record drought is having an effect on honey production. The historic drought, now in its third year, is reducing supplies of California honey, raising prices for consumers and making it harder for beekeepers to earn a living.

But kosher sources say that they have noticed an appreciable increase in the sale of honey products, including pastries. Norman’s Dairy even markets an apple and honey flavor in its highly touted Greek Yogurt products.

The hope is that it all makes for a sweet new year.

 

 

 

 

The Real and Radical Legacy of Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach

Monday, September 1st, 2014

More robust accounts of Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach’s life have come to the surface following 20 years after he died on Oct. 20, 1994.

Earlier this year, Natan Ophir published the book “Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach: Life, Mission & Legacy.” This past summer, Rabbi Shlomo Katz’s “The Soul of Jerusalem” hit the shelves.

But even the authors will admit that this larger-than-life, soul-hugging rabbi’s legacy cannot be fully captured in black-and-white pages.

“Shlomo did not seem to fit any restrictive, defining label,” Ophir told JNS.org. “Reb Shlomo was… a charismatic teacher who combined storytelling, sermonic exegesis, and inspirational insights into creating a new form of heartfelt, soulful Judaism filled with a love for all human beings.”

Carlebach, born in Germany from where his family fled following the Nazi invasion, immigrated to New York in March 1939 from Lithuania, just six months before the Nazis invaded that country. In 1945, the family moved to Manhattan so his father, Rabbi Naphtali Carlebach, could take over Congregation Kehilath Jacob on W. 79th Street. After his father’s passing, Carlebach assumed leadership of the synagogue, today known as “The Carlebach Shul.”

It was from his home base at The Carlebach Shul that Shlomo Carlebach set up the first known Hassidic outreach program, Taste and See God is Good (T.S.G.G.). According to Ophir, the organization was based on the idea that, as Carlebach said, “You cannot begin to talk to people about God unless you have first given them a taste of God is good.”

In 1968, Carlebach established the House of Love and Prayer in San Francisco, the first Jewish commune.

His empathetic approach toward the spiritual imports from the Far East was radical for an Orthodox rabbi,” said Ophir.

Everything Carlebach did was radical. He traveled to Germany in the 1960s to teach people whose parents had murdered scores of Jewish people that the time for peace and forgiveness had come, recalled Ben-Zion Solomon, whose home is next door to the late Carlebach’s in the central Israeli community of Moshav Mevo Modi’in, also known as the “Carlebach moshav.”

Carlebach was a scholar in his own right, studying at some of the most renowned American yeshivot. He later connected with the Lubavitch movement, whose leader at the time, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, encouraged him to go into outreach. This mandate was the start of what became his calling, serving as the rabbi of the hippie movement.

He had followers around the globe. Many young Jews returned to a Torah lifestyle as a result of their relationship with Carlebach.

His daughter Dari Carlebach said in a previous interview that her father was caught between two worlds—the religious/yeshiva world and the hippie world. She said her father had a huge desire “to love and heal the world,” and he did it with “such heart and grace and empathy.”

Shlomo Carlebach’s unbridled passion might account for why it has taken this long to begin to canonize his legacy. Solomon recounts the way that his rebbe could focus on whoever needed him at the time, that “whoever he was talking to, he became their best friend.”

Solomon and wife Dina met Carlebach in California. Carlebach encouraged Solomon to learn in Israel and eventually to make aliyah, and then handpicked his family to live on the Carlebach moshav.

Solomon recalled that when he arrived in Israel, he was told by the Orthodox-affiliated Diaspora Yeshiva that his wedding to Dina was not valid, as they did not have a ketubah, the Jewish marriage contract. He called Carlebach in a panic. The rabbi told him to get some wine and cake and meet him at the Shabbos House in Jerusalem at 1 a.m.

Joan Rivers in Medically-Induced Coma

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

Doctors are hopeful that they can bring Jewish comedienne Joan Rivers out of a medically-induced coma by Sunday after she suffered cardiac arrest during minor throat surgery in New York on Thursday.

Her condition has been upgraded from “critical” to stable, but it is not known if she suffered brain damage due to lack of oxygen before arriving at the hospital.

“Her family wants to thank everybody for their outpouring of love and support. We will provide an update on her condition as it becomes available,” according to spokesman for Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York.

Her daughter Melissa flew in from California with her son to be by her 81-year-old mother’s side and said she is an “emotional wreck.” Melissa stated, “My mother would be so touched by the tributes and prayers that we have received from around the world.”

Rivers was a pioneer in opening the field of comedy to women and first become widely-known with an appearance on the Tonight Show in the days of Johnny Carson.

She made headlines during the war with Hamas by her solid support for Israel and her disgust for Hamas, going so far as to say that civilians in Gaza “deserve to be dead” for allowing them to be exploited by terrorists.

“The dead? You deserve to be dead. You started it. Don’t you dare make me feel sad about that,” she said in one interview.

“Tell that to the people in Hiroshima. When you declare war, you declare war. They started it.”

 

British Man Beats Up Anti-Semite George Galloway

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

British police have arrested a 39-year-old man, (not Jewish, we’re not sure if that surprises us or not) for assault anti-Israel and anti-Semitic Member of Parliament George Galloway, who was hospitalized for broken ribs and a head injury.

The attacker was identified as Neil Masterson.

Galloway has been released from the hospital, but it is doubtful that the attacker was able to beat some sense into his head.

The MP, who has built his political career on loving Saddam Hussein and Hamas and hating Jews and Israel, was posing for pictures in west London Friday night when the attacker jumped on him while calling him “Hitler.”

The assault “appears to be connected with his comments about Israel because the guy was shouting about the Holocaust,” said Galloway’s spokesman. The name of his one-MP party is Respect, which indicates his ignorance of the English language.

The party’s name is a very contrived acronym for Respect, Equality, Socialism, Peace, Environmentalism, Community and Trade Unionism. A more accurate acronym would be “Racist, Extremist, Satanic, Pisher, Ethnic=hatingt, Crude and Twisted.

Galloway has been under police investigation since his call earlier this month that the city of Bradford, which he represents, be an “Israel-free” zone that would bar Israeli tourist and place a total ban on anything related to Israel.

We wish Galloway a speedy recovery and hope that some of the medicine he needs is made in Israel.

California Earthquake Wreaks Havoc at Chabad House

Monday, August 25th, 2014

The 6.1 earthquake that jolted northern California in the middle of the night Sunday upended furniture and scattered broken glass at the Napa Valley Chabad Jewish Center.

“It was very violent—not a gentle rolling quake, but more of a jolting traumatic experience that shocked us out of sleep at 3:20 a.m. and lasted for about half a minute, Rabbi Elchonon Tenenbaum told the Chabad website.

The rabbi, his wife and five children were not injured.

Tenenbaum said he waited outside with his neighbors until daybreak before going back into his home and Chabad center, where power had been lost, to survey the damage. Upended furniture and broken glass prevented him from accessing some rooms, including his office. A disaster recovery fund was quickly established for those wanting to help out.

“I went to check up on people in the area and found that they were in a similar situation,” he added. “Their houses are standing, but everything inside has been ruined. Thank God, this happened in the middle of the night when we were in our beds and not in other parts of our homes, where heavy bookcases fell over.”

The Chabad website reported, “Tenenbaum says that waking up in the middle of the night with his children screaming amid violent banging and shaking helped him picture what life must be like on a regular basis for people living in Israel, where Hamas has been firing rockets from Gaza for much of the summer.”

“It is really surreal,” he said. “There are some stores that are functioning as usual, and others have been completely destroyed for now. Some streets are buckled, and others are just fine. Some people have broken water mains or leaking gas pipes, and others do not.”

Many residents in the area, famous for its wineries, are crying over wine spilled from barrels that were broken from the earthquake.

The largest quake to hit the San Francisco area in 25 years, it caused several injuries, including three who are in critical condition, set off fires and knocked out power.

Napa’s downtown historical areas sustained irreparable damage.

Lev Tahor Cult Quietly Leaves Canada

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014

The Haredi Lev Tahor cult is leaving its community from Canada to Guatemala, where other families of the group fled earlier this year.

Approximately six families still are in Chatham, Ontario, where the cult was based after having escaped last year from Quebec, where it faced various criminal charges of child abuse and child custody disputes with welfare officials.

Several children and adults fled Ontario last March, and some of them reached Guatemala while others were returned to Canada by immigration authorities.

Five or six families still remain in Ontario, the London Free Press reported Friday. Most of the 200 cult members who left Quebec are in Guatemala, and a few have moved to the United States and Israel.

“This story is going to end not with a bang, but with a very loud fizzle,” Lev Tahor’ lawyer Guidy Mamann told the newspaper.

“I don’t think anybody is planning on staying.”

Mamann said that there are not enough men remaining to hold a minyan for daily prayers. “The yeshiva more or less closed down. They have only six guys left,” he added.

Bomb Scare Forces Evacuation of Australian Jewish School

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

More than 200 students at the King David School in Melbourne, Australia were moved off the campus after 8 a.m. Thursday when security personnel found an abandoned van containing a suspicious object near the school.

The Australian Jewish community’s Community Security Group alerted local police, and the department’s Bomb Response Unit used a remote-controlled robot to examine the van. The van did not contain explosives, and the campus was declared safe at approximately 11 a.m.

“While this did prove to be a false alarm, parents should rest assured that the security and safety of our students is our highest priority,” King David principal Marc Light wrote in a letter to parents Thursday.

The school makes “no apologies” for following security protocols, Light told local media.

“We haven’t had any specific threat to the school or to our students whatsoever,” he said.

The false alarm came hours before protesters gathered in Sydney near the opening of the Israeli Film Festival after a judge had blocked the planned protest outside the cinema.

Nevertheless, some protesters handed out leaflets to people entering the cinema urging a boycott of the festival, calling it part of a “charm offensive” to present Israel in a favorable light and to “disguise and legitimize the oppression of Palestinians.”

Inside, Albert Dadon, founder of the Australia Israel Cultural Exchange, which organizes the film festival, told the audience that he had started telling his children to be careful.

“I didn’t think in Australia I’d have to do that,” Dadon said.

The festival, in its 11th year, will screen in major cities across Australia for the next two weeks.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/bomb-scare-forces-evacuation-of-australian-jewish-school/2014/08/21/

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