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September 1, 2015 / 17 Elul, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘marathon’

The Efrat Marathon

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

Lately it seems that everything interesting is happening in Efrat.

On Friday, hundreds of runners of all ages (apparently dogs too) took part in the Efrat marathon.

Tiberias Marathon Underway

Friday, January 9th, 2015

It’s only 35.6 degrees (F) outside, but that won’t stop the runners.

The Tiberias Marathon is currently underway this cold Friday morning.

IDF Bars Gaza Runner from Bethlehem Marathon

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Israel’s Supreme Court upheld a decision by the Israel Defense Forces to bar a Palestinian runner from Gaza from participating in a marathon in Bethlehem but nevertheless recommended that he be allowed to participate in the race.

Olympian Nader Masri, 34, had asked Israel’s military for permission to travel to the second Bethlehem marathon that is to be held Friday.

Following a rejection from the military, Masri, with the help of the Legal Center for Freedom of Movement, known as Gisha, appealed to the Supreme Court, which ruled on Tuesday that it could not overrule a military decision. However, as Israeli courts often do, it injected its own quasi-legal opinion and recommended that Israel consider allowing the runner to leave to participate in the race.

“It is hoped, of course, that in the future the security situation will improve that will allow an easing of such restrictions.” Judge Daphne Barak-Erez wrote in her decision.

Masri has represented the Palestinian Authority in several international competitions, including in Ireland, Portugal, Belgium and Doha. He represented “Palestine” in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

One Thing I Wouldn’t Blame on Obama

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

During my thirteen 13 years as Shiloh’s Girls Gym Teacher, I was careful to obey the rule that said it’s forbidden to have outdoor lessons when the temperature is over 30 degrees Centigrade.

This past Friday was a hot  spring day.  In Tel Aviv, where they were having their Half Marathon, it was up to 36 degrees centigrade.  One runner died and others were hospitalized.
Tel Aviv Half-Marathon Ends in Tragedy After Runner Dies
Man in his early 30s collapses from heat stroke, medical crews unable to save him • Over 50 runners hospitalized, 12 in critical condition • Tel Aviv mayor: Obama’s visit made event impossible to postpone [emphasis added] • “Writing was on the wall,” says health expert. (Yisrael HaYom)

They didn’t expect such summer weather.  Looking at the Christian calendar, people were surprised that we had such hot weather in the middle of March, but if you look at the Jewish Calendar, and it’s very common for there to be summer weather early in the month of Nissan, just over a week before Passover.  We almost always have some very hot weather this time of the Jewish Year.

The organizers should have thought of what’s best for the runners and cancelled the race.  And from now on, they should schedule according to the Jewish Calendar and have it before Purim.  Yes, it may rain, but it doesn’t snow in Tel Aviv.
Visit Shiloh Musings.

Hamas’ Gender Ban Forces UNWRA to Ban Marathon

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

A woman’s place is not in a marathon, at least not with men, says Hamas, whose ban on females running with males prompted UNRWA to canceling the annual Gaza marathon for the first time.

In announcing the cancellation of the April 10 marathon, UNRWA stated, “This disappointing decision follows discussions with the authorities in Gaza who have insisted that no women should participate.”

If Haredim had convinced Jerusalem officials to cancel this past Sunday’s marathon in the capital because of the presence of women runners, God forbid, Israel would have been condemned from every parliament in the country, outside of Iran and Egypt.

Foreign aid would have been threatened and thousands of tourists would have canceled trips to Israel in protest.

In Gaza, things work a bit differently.

UNRWA said it “regrets” the Hamas ban on women but not to worry. “Registered participants who still wish to come to Gaza are welcome and UNRWA is working on a program of other events, which will be forwarded to those interested as soon as possible.”

Hamas said the marathon could have proceeded as usual if “local traditions” were respected.

Apparently, tradition has changed, and Hamas has gone further in the direction of extreme Islam by banning women runners for the first time.

The BBC, instead of commiserating over the separation of sexes, told its readers, “Conservative elements in Gaza have sometimes complained about mixing between the sexes, especially in schools and at sporting events.”

Hamas, of course, blames UNRWA for calling off the race. “We did not tell UNRWA to cancel the marathon and we haven’t prevented it, but we laid down some conditions: We don’t want women and men mixing in the same place,” Hamas’s cabinet secretary Abdessalam Siyyam told the AFP news agency.

Running in Jerusalem

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

A few months ago, not even three, people in and around Jerusalem were running for their lives. A siren had broken the moments before the Sabbath came in late on a Friday afternoon. A siren…an air-raid siren…going up and going down…not planned. Incoming missile.

It’s going to take me a long time, perhaps a lifetime to forget those choking minutes of terror as we moved into the bomb shelter, my mind consumed with who wasn’t with us. Aliza, my baby, was outside somewhere. Yes, at 12 years old, she was still my baby. My grandson, not even two, was outside somewhere. Yes, he was with his father, but that knowledge did nothing to calm the terror my daughter was feeling. Shmulik and Naama – probably downstairs, probably safe. Lauren, Elie’s wife, .she was in their apartment fighting back her own feelings as she searched for things Elie would need. He’d just been called to the army, potentially to war.

On Friday, people were running in Jerusalem again, but this time – for a marathon and it isn’t all of Jerusalem – but 20,000 people! I went to the local supermarket to buy a few things and as I always do, I had the radio turned to the news channel. They were talking about the traffic nightmare that was already being caused by the closed streets as the marathon was just getting started.

“It isn’t fun being a Jerusalemite this morning,” said one newscaster, as the second continued to report on closed roads.

And then the second mentioned that there were 20,000 runners.

“Not a small marathan,” responded the first.

And then, the most amazing response of all, the second newscast just said, “Jerusalem.”

Jerusalem. I wish words could easily show tone, expression. In that one word, so much was said. Of course there are so many, of course it is a large marathon – we are talking about Jerusalem.

I can hear him saying the word over and over again, in love, in awe – Jerusalem.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Finish Line (Conclusion)

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

At certain points in each of our lives, we are given challenges – some big, some small. Some people embrace it, welcoming every chance they get to grow and mature, while others are deathly afraid of any sort of change in their blissful, comfortable routine.

I was given many challenges over the past year and a half, none of which I would have ever chosen to face had I been given the choice. But as we face the challenges head-on that come our way and overcome them, we grow and become better, wiser and more understanding people. Our struggles are what make us who we are and determine how we relate to others. And hopefully, we can look back at our challenges and appreciate the level of trust God has in us to overcome them.

Regardless of the painful experiences I was dealing with, there was one challenge that I took on with anticipation and determination. Running a half-marathon – 13.1 miles – is not something I ever thought I would do, yet that’s exactly what I did this past January in Miami Beach. Along with 134 other members of Team Yachad, I ran in support of Yachad, the National Jewish Council for Disabilities.

My adventure started about six months ago in a New Jersey high school with my first meeting with some of the dedicated staff members and runners. I also met with Coach Jasmine (“Jaz”) Graham, who patiently answered every question I threw at her, and who provided me with my very own training regimen to fit my schedule.

Training for the half-marathon was a challenge I both dreaded and looked forward to. Unfortunately I have never before been able to incorporate regular fitness into my daily routine, as there never seemed to be enough time in the day to get to the gym or enough energy to hit the treadmill. Training with Yachad was the motivation I needed to start moving, and thus began my personal journey to fitness, awareness, and self-discovery.

Team Yachad 2012

I was extremely self-conscious the first time I went running. I kept looking around to see if there was anybody that I knew, and comparing my speed with the numerous other people who were running through the park. At the end of my run, I was both exhausted and exhilarated. The fact that I was able to run the few miles, despite never accomplishing this before, gave me an enormous feeling of pride. I felt like I wanted to do this every single day.

That feeling lasted about 10 or 12 hours – until every bone in my body began to ache and bring me pain. Yet the incredible rush that running gave me motivated me to continue, and I was determined to support and run along with Team Yachad in the half-marathon. Running gave me an opportunity to be alone with my thoughts, to clear my head, and to escape (at least for that hour or so) the chaos that was going on in my personal life. Something about the fresh air, the rhythmic sound of my feet hitting the pavement, and the peace and quiet through the park was soothing. It was exactly what I needed at that point in my life.

After a few weeks of training, I began to notice a change in myself, both during my workout and in general. I was feeling more confident, more sure of my abilities and myself. I ran with better posture, I wasn’t comparing myself to the other runners in the park, and I felt like I could do anything. I never realized the impact that the training alone would have on my life.

After several months and a few bumps along the road, including a bad fall and a torn ligament, I finally arrived in Miami Beach for the Yachad marathon weekend. The Shabbaton was incredible, and I met many special people during my trip. The marathon itself was a once-in-a-lifetime experience that will stay with me forever. The incredibly gratifying feeling of satisfaction and pride after finishing the race with Team Yachad is indescribable. It was also quite inspirational to see the display of unity, the inclusion of every single person – including 15 runners with disabilities – and the dedication each runner displayed toward Yachad and each other.

Looking back, I am honored to have been part of such a moving experience. It was humbling to meet Yachad’s special people, along with its staff, members, volunteers, and everyone who participated in the event. I still continue to run when I can, feeling much more secure and comfortable when I do. Yachad has influenced my life in many ways, and inspired me to take on something I never thought I could do. For those feelings alone, I am truly grateful.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/finish-line-conclusion/2012/03/22/

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