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December 20, 2014 / 28 Kislev, 5775
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘marathon’

One Thing I Wouldn’t Blame on Obama

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

During my thirteen 13 years as Shiloh’s Girls Gym Teacher, I was careful to obey the rule that said it’s forbidden to have outdoor lessons when the temperature is over 30 degrees Centigrade.

This past Friday was a hot  spring day.  In Tel Aviv, where they were having their Half Marathon, it was up to 36 degrees centigrade.  One runner died and others were hospitalized.
Tel Aviv Half-Marathon Ends in Tragedy After Runner Dies
Man in his early 30s collapses from heat stroke, medical crews unable to save him • Over 50 runners hospitalized, 12 in critical condition • Tel Aviv mayor: Obama’s visit made event impossible to postpone [emphasis added] • “Writing was on the wall,” says health expert. (Yisrael HaYom)

They didn’t expect such summer weather.  Looking at the Christian calendar, people were surprised that we had such hot weather in the middle of March, but if you look at the Jewish Calendar, and it’s very common for there to be summer weather early in the month of Nissan, just over a week before Passover.  We almost always have some very hot weather this time of the Jewish Year.

The organizers should have thought of what’s best for the runners and cancelled the race.  And from now on, they should schedule according to the Jewish Calendar and have it before Purim.  Yes, it may rain, but it doesn’t snow in Tel Aviv.
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Hamas’ Gender Ban Forces UNWRA to Ban Marathon

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

A woman’s place is not in a marathon, at least not with men, says Hamas, whose ban on females running with males prompted UNRWA to canceling the annual Gaza marathon for the first time.

In announcing the cancellation of the April 10 marathon, UNRWA stated, “This disappointing decision follows discussions with the authorities in Gaza who have insisted that no women should participate.”

If Haredim had convinced Jerusalem officials to cancel this past Sunday’s marathon in the capital because of the presence of women runners, God forbid, Israel would have been condemned from every parliament in the country, outside of Iran and Egypt.

Foreign aid would have been threatened and thousands of tourists would have canceled trips to Israel in protest.

In Gaza, things work a bit differently.

UNRWA said it “regrets” the Hamas ban on women but not to worry. “Registered participants who still wish to come to Gaza are welcome and UNRWA is working on a program of other events, which will be forwarded to those interested as soon as possible.”

Hamas said the marathon could have proceeded as usual if “local traditions” were respected.

Apparently, tradition has changed, and Hamas has gone further in the direction of extreme Islam by banning women runners for the first time.

The BBC, instead of commiserating over the separation of sexes, told its readers, “Conservative elements in Gaza have sometimes complained about mixing between the sexes, especially in schools and at sporting events.”

Hamas, of course, blames UNRWA for calling off the race. “We did not tell UNRWA to cancel the marathon and we haven’t prevented it, but we laid down some conditions: We don’t want women and men mixing in the same place,” Hamas’s cabinet secretary Abdessalam Siyyam told the AFP news agency.

Running in Jerusalem

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

A few months ago, not even three, people in and around Jerusalem were running for their lives. A siren had broken the moments before the Sabbath came in late on a Friday afternoon. A siren…an air-raid siren…going up and going down…not planned. Incoming missile.

It’s going to take me a long time, perhaps a lifetime to forget those choking minutes of terror as we moved into the bomb shelter, my mind consumed with who wasn’t with us. Aliza, my baby, was outside somewhere. Yes, at 12 years old, she was still my baby. My grandson, not even two, was outside somewhere. Yes, he was with his father, but that knowledge did nothing to calm the terror my daughter was feeling. Shmulik and Naama – probably downstairs, probably safe. Lauren, Elie’s wife, .she was in their apartment fighting back her own feelings as she searched for things Elie would need. He’d just been called to the army, potentially to war.

On Friday, people were running in Jerusalem again, but this time – for a marathon and it isn’t all of Jerusalem – but 20,000 people! I went to the local supermarket to buy a few things and as I always do, I had the radio turned to the news channel. They were talking about the traffic nightmare that was already being caused by the closed streets as the marathon was just getting started.

“It isn’t fun being a Jerusalemite this morning,” said one newscaster, as the second continued to report on closed roads.

And then the second mentioned that there were 20,000 runners.

“Not a small marathan,” responded the first.

And then, the most amazing response of all, the second newscast just said, “Jerusalem.”

Jerusalem. I wish words could easily show tone, expression. In that one word, so much was said. Of course there are so many, of course it is a large marathon – we are talking about Jerusalem.

I can hear him saying the word over and over again, in love, in awe – Jerusalem.

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Finish Line (Conclusion)

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

At certain points in each of our lives, we are given challenges – some big, some small. Some people embrace it, welcoming every chance they get to grow and mature, while others are deathly afraid of any sort of change in their blissful, comfortable routine.

I was given many challenges over the past year and a half, none of which I would have ever chosen to face had I been given the choice. But as we face the challenges head-on that come our way and overcome them, we grow and become better, wiser and more understanding people. Our struggles are what make us who we are and determine how we relate to others. And hopefully, we can look back at our challenges and appreciate the level of trust God has in us to overcome them.

Regardless of the painful experiences I was dealing with, there was one challenge that I took on with anticipation and determination. Running a half-marathon – 13.1 miles – is not something I ever thought I would do, yet that’s exactly what I did this past January in Miami Beach. Along with 134 other members of Team Yachad, I ran in support of Yachad, the National Jewish Council for Disabilities.

My adventure started about six months ago in a New Jersey high school with my first meeting with some of the dedicated staff members and runners. I also met with Coach Jasmine (“Jaz”) Graham, who patiently answered every question I threw at her, and who provided me with my very own training regimen to fit my schedule.

Training for the half-marathon was a challenge I both dreaded and looked forward to. Unfortunately I have never before been able to incorporate regular fitness into my daily routine, as there never seemed to be enough time in the day to get to the gym or enough energy to hit the treadmill. Training with Yachad was the motivation I needed to start moving, and thus began my personal journey to fitness, awareness, and self-discovery.

Team Yachad 2012

I was extremely self-conscious the first time I went running. I kept looking around to see if there was anybody that I knew, and comparing my speed with the numerous other people who were running through the park. At the end of my run, I was both exhausted and exhilarated. The fact that I was able to run the few miles, despite never accomplishing this before, gave me an enormous feeling of pride. I felt like I wanted to do this every single day.

That feeling lasted about 10 or 12 hours – until every bone in my body began to ache and bring me pain. Yet the incredible rush that running gave me motivated me to continue, and I was determined to support and run along with Team Yachad in the half-marathon. Running gave me an opportunity to be alone with my thoughts, to clear my head, and to escape (at least for that hour or so) the chaos that was going on in my personal life. Something about the fresh air, the rhythmic sound of my feet hitting the pavement, and the peace and quiet through the park was soothing. It was exactly what I needed at that point in my life.

After a few weeks of training, I began to notice a change in myself, both during my workout and in general. I was feeling more confident, more sure of my abilities and myself. I ran with better posture, I wasn’t comparing myself to the other runners in the park, and I felt like I could do anything. I never realized the impact that the training alone would have on my life.

After several months and a few bumps along the road, including a bad fall and a torn ligament, I finally arrived in Miami Beach for the Yachad marathon weekend. The Shabbaton was incredible, and I met many special people during my trip. The marathon itself was a once-in-a-lifetime experience that will stay with me forever. The incredibly gratifying feeling of satisfaction and pride after finishing the race with Team Yachad is indescribable. It was also quite inspirational to see the display of unity, the inclusion of every single person – including 15 runners with disabilities – and the dedication each runner displayed toward Yachad and each other.

Looking back, I am honored to have been part of such a moving experience. It was humbling to meet Yachad’s special people, along with its staff, members, volunteers, and everyone who participated in the event. I still continue to run when I can, feeling much more secure and comfortable when I do. Yachad has influenced my life in many ways, and inspired me to take on something I never thought I could do. For those feelings alone, I am truly grateful.

Living, Loving, and Running: Pia Levine is Full of Life!

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

Pia Levine, one of several March 23 2011 suicide bombing victims near Jerusalem’s International Convention Center (Binyanei Ha’uma) rebounded from the horror with classy style. A Yeshiva University Sy Syms School of Business sophomore, she ran in last Thursday’s Jerusalem Marathon. She is consistent. Less than two days after the 2011 attempt to end her life, she completed the Jerusalem Marathon in 2 hours and 10 minutes.

Teaming up with the Team One Family in tribute to the One Family Fund, Pia is grateful that Team One helped her to recover from the trauma of the attack with assistance and support in Israel and in New Jersey. Her tenacity and optimism are irrepresible. Her courage and tenacity are motivating terror survivors around the world to achieve their potential. I spoke with this world-class athlete about her inspiring story on the eve of this years marathon.

YG: What have been the most important aspects of your ability to cope with the 2011 bombing and it’s after effects in your life? How did Team One initially approach you to help your recovery along? PL: Chantal Belzberg, the executive chairperson for One Family Fund, was the first person to approach me. She picked me up the day after the attack. She knew because my brother who lives in Israel and goes to Bar Ilan contacted One Family. She picked me up, took me to the hospital to be treated for shock, took me to a pharmacy, and back to the hotel I was staying at with my team. Days after I landed in America, I was put in touch with Michelle Napell, who got me involved in running with Team One.

Since the moment I left Israel last March I started planning my return. The ability to get back on the Tel Aviv 12 hour-flight, step onto Israeli soil and hopefully get on a bus and run this year’s marathon has really been a personal aspiration. When I landed in America, I did the farthest thing from coping. I used to ignore it, pretending it didn’t happen until I realized I couldn’t live like that. I would flinch from loud noises and hide at the sounds of storms. The sound of little pebbles hitting my windshield sounded like the pieces of shrapnel hitting the bus and the glass shattering. It was an overall bad sign. Michelle Napell at One Family Fund became my rock. She taught me how to cope. She revealed to me that talking about it would really make me feel better-and it did. She also suggested I sign up for the NYC triathlon last august, because the exercise in the direction of accomplishing something so major was bound to help. She was right.

YG:  How long have you been a marathoner? How do you train?

PL: My first marathon was the Jerusalem Marathon last march. I never thought of myself as much of a runner even though I loved the idea of it. I followed it by participating the TD 5-boro bike tour in May (which I had done part of the previous year) and then the Nautica NYC triathlon in August.

I’ve never really been much into the training. For last year’s marathon I trained for a week in February until I was distracted by other things. The bike tour training meant that I spent a few weeks at the gym practicing until I could bike 42 miles. Then I did a ride or two in Long Island, enjoying my fellow teammates and the scenery. The triathlon required a lot more training than I actually gave it. I figured that the bike tour was all the training I needed for the biking part of the triathlon, the marathon was double the run for the triathlon, so I figured training was optional. I spent like once a week at the gym practicing the transition between the bike and running, ate a lot of bananas. By race day I was able to finish. That’s really what counts.

This year I actually spent the last month bi-weekly running in the gym in the basement of my dorm. I know from experience that the treadmill is nothing compared to the hills of Jerusalem but I am excited about the challenge.

YG: What are you studying at Sy Syms School?

PL: I am studying accounting. I became a licensed real estate salesperson a couple years back. I was fascinated with the opportunities in the field and I can see my self working the accounting aspect of some real estate business.

YG: What are your favorite activities in Israel?

PL: I love hiking and exploring in Israel. This past year I actually worked on an archaeological dig for three month in Israel. I LOVED the experience, a hands-on history lesson which made me appreciate the country more than I already did.

The Amazing Race (Part III)

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

As some of you may know, either through my previous articles, numerous online posts, or non-stop chatter about the topic, I recently had the pleasure of attending Yachad’s marathon weekend event in Miami Beach, Florida. I was invited to participate in this incredible experience, both as a writer and as a runner, and to feel firsthand what the words unity, commitment, dedication, and inspiration truly mean.

It all started three years ago when Yachad, the National Jewish Council for Disabilities, put together a team of 29 runners to participate in the ING Miami Marathon and Half Marathon, with the goal of raising much-needed funds for this incredible organization. The following year, that number doubled, with 77 runners committing to and running the marathon. This year was their most successful one yet, with 135 runners fundraising, training for, and running 13.1 or 26.2 miles, all with the same goal: to help Yachad continue their dedicated work of enhancing the life opportunities of individuals with disabilities, and ensuring their participation in the full spectrum of Jewish life.

My experience with Yachad began well before the actual marathon, dating back about six months or so when I first signed up to join the team. After my initial meeting with some of the dedicated staff members and runners in a New Jersey high school, I attended a couple of training sessions with Coach Jasmine (“Jaz”) Graham, who patiently answered every question I threw at her, and who provided me with my very own training regimen to fit my schedule.

Team Yachad 2012

After months of training and hard work, I hopped on a plane from rainy New York City to beautiful, sunny Miami Beach. The weekend began with the entire group meeting on Friday and registering for the race at the Miami Beach Convention Center, which was packed with booths, vendors, visitors and excited runners who were gearing up for Sunday’s race. After that, it was off to the beautiful Newport Beachside Resort in Sunny Isles, Florida on a chartered bus, followed by a lovely Friday afternoon lunch.

Then it was off to our hotel rooms to get ready for Shabbos. Walking into the beautiful room that the staff at Yachad had prepared, I was pleasantly surprised to discover a travel bag waiting for me, filled with goodies like snacks, drinks, health items, orange Team Yachad T-shirts, headbands, and several other surprises. On the bag were two tags; one had my name with the title “runner,” the other had my three-year-old daughter’s name with “fan club” underneath. It seemed like Yachad had taken care of every detail – from the couch-bed pulled out and made up for my daughter, to the many bottles of Gatorade that were provided for us even before the actual race.

It has been quite a number of years since I’ve attended summer camp, but that’s exactly what Shabbos with Yachad felt like. From the beautiful Friday night davening, to the heartfelt singing at the Shabbos table, to the warm feeling of unity that was felt throughout the entire Shabbos, from beginning to end. Many of the runners were high school students who are connected to or involvedwith Yachad and are tremendous supporters of its work. Other runners included college students, grad students, and professionals who took time off of work to support Team Yachad. Others were staff members from different branches of the Orthodox Union throughout the country, and came with their families, some even recruiting their spouse to run right along with them. However they got there or whatever their motivation, every member of Team Yachad contributed to the Shabbaton and to the entire weekend in their own unique way – helping make it as special as it was.

Shabbos afternoon consisted of a beautiful Shabbos lunch, followed by a chance for everyone to enjoy the boardwalk, the beach, or to simply rest. Right after shalosh seudos, everyone gathered in a circle to sing Shabbos zemiros as a group. This was followed by one of my personal highlights of the weekend: a question-and-answer session with Richard Bernstein. Bernstein, 37, is blind since birth, and ran with Team Yachad for the first time in this year’s ING Miami Marathon. He has completed 15 marathons – including seven NYC Marathons, the Ironman Triathlon and the Israman Triathlon. An attorney, he is a tireless advocate for disabled rights and was so excited to run as part of Yachad, an organization that works hard at enhancing the life opportunities of individuals with disabilities, the very same mission to which he has devoted his life. It was a privilege to hear him speak and to have him share inspiration with the entire team.

Another inspirational moment for me came at the end of Shabbos, during Havdalah. As many of the team members were teenagers, I expected them all to race out of the shul the minute Shabbos was over and head straight toward their cell phones/laptops/iPods/cameras/iPads, etc. Much to my surprise, Havdalah was a lengthy and very beautiful ritual that I don’t normally have the pleasure to witness. When it was over, the kids started singing, “Six more days ‘till Shabbos…” and formed a circle, singing and dancing as if they didn’t want Shabbos to end. It was incredibly inspiring.

Zehava Shmueli: Women’s Leadership Awardee

Thursday, November 24th, 2011

The Women’s Leadership Award was created in 2007 by the European Athletics Development Committee to raise awareness of the issues related to women and leadership in athletics. National recipients were declared for 24 European countries, and the Israeli Athletic Association voted Zehava Shmueli the national winner of this most prestigious award.

This has not been Zehava Shmueli’s first, nor was it her last award. This year the Israeli Athletic Association honored Shmueli at the Israeli Open Championships with the Israeli Women in Sport Award and named her an honorary member of the Association, declaring: “Shmueli exemplifies the spirit of the European Athletics Women’s Leadership Award through her extraordinary athletic records and her current strong community involvement. She has contributed not only to women’s athletics but to all women’s sports in Israel, and for this she is a role model to all.”

Zehava Shmueli represented Israel in a number of World Championships, among them the 1983 Marathon in Helsinki, Finland and the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, USA where she placed 30th in the Marathon.

Shmueli got her start in running at age 12 when a teacher noticed her natural talent. She competed at a young age but stopped at 17. After marrying and having two children she missed the sport and began to run with a local club two days a week. It only took a year of training for Shmueli to reenter the competitive world. She broke records and won races throughout Israel.

Currently retired from competition, Shmueli lives in Ramat Hasharon where she is still active in the running world. She founded “Runners of Ramat Hasharon,” helping to train athletes for long distance and marathon competitions, and managing all youth athletics in town. The most memorable of all the races Zehava organizes is the “Eyal Race,” one of Israel’s largest running events, in memory of her beloved athletic son, Eyal Shmueli, who tragically collapsed and died of cardiac arrest in June 2001 when he was 27.  A young family member remembers Eyal as a kind, loving soul:  “For my family, the smile he had on his face when he fell told them that his death was that of an angel.” The famous “Eyal Race” is Zehava’s way of coping with her grief.

“I approached Zehava to help me train for the New York City marathon because of her reputation as an exceptional runner and coach,” relates Yitzchaka Jackson who successfully completed her run in this year’s New York City Marathon. “At first Zehava was not that keen to take on a ‘newbie’ runner like me. But after she understood my reason for running this race she got behind the project 100% and helped me make it to the finish line.”  We featured Yitzchaka’s story in our October 28 issue.  Yitzchaka tells us, “While we have received generous donations, we still, unfortunately, fall short of our targeted amount of $42,000. ($1,000. for each of the 42 marathon kilometers).”

”Would you please ask your readers to visit http://www.irunforavi.com/how-to-donate,” Yitzchaka implored. “They can help us complete the mitzvah of Zehava Shmueli’s efforts.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/jewess-press/impact-women-history/zehava-shmueli-womens-leadership-awardee/2011/11/24/

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