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July 31, 2015 / 15 Av, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘pesach’

The Difference Between Wheat and Rice on Pesach

Friday, March 27th, 2015

A little bit of humor on a serious Pesach subject.

18 Minutes to Get it in the Oven

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Technion’s Rube Goldberg Machine Passover Seder

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Rabbi Manis Friedman on Rosh Chodesh Nissan

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

Behar: Why Does Land have to Rest?

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

We talked last week about seeing Shabbat in different worlds. But how do we understand, conceptually, what this means? In this week’s video, we look at Pesach, Shemittah and Yovel and ask, where do we see Shabbat, and why does it matter?

Visit AlephBeta.  /  Rabbi David Fohrman

Dominican Friar Erik Ross: Israel Embodies the Jewish Heart & Seder Acid Test

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Yishai is joined by Dominican Friar and dear friend of the Fleishers Erik Ross. Together, they discuss the principal reason behind Ross’s current trip to Israel and the background behind the Catholic world’s study of how science relates to the Bible. Listen in as Ross gives a dynamic description of the Seder he attended in Israel and the diverse figures that were present.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
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Pesach’s Dusty Windows (Part Four)

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

For the past several columns I’ve been focusing on “windows” – albeit dusty windows that block our vision and prevent us from looking out and seeing the reality of our Jewish lives.

These windows are everywhere; they encompass our Yom Tovim and all events that befall us. These windows speak. They send us messages. But our ears do not hear. Our eyes do not see. Our windows are covered with layers of thick dust that have accumulated over the millennia.

We have just celebrated the wonderful days of Pesach when G-d broke the chains of our bondage and led us forth to Sinai and the Promised Land. We had beautiful Seders, and while at some point our eyelids may have become heavy with slumber, we forced ourselves to remain awake as we related the story and sang the songs of the Haggadah.

In the midst of our celebration, however, it never occurred to us to look out of our dusty windows, and after Yom Tov we returned to normal everyday life.

Yet the windows of Pesach are crucial. Through them we can see our bitter exile.  Yes, the Haggadah speaks loud and clear: In every generation there are those who stand ready to pounce upon us and devour us but Hashem saves us from their hands. But few of us look out our windows and ask, Why does Hashem have to save us? Why are they trying to devour us?

We fail to understand that all of Jewish history is a replay of sorts. “Whatever happened to our forefathers is a sign” – a message to their descendants concerning what will happen throughout their long and bitter exile.

Let’s dust off the windows and study that first bondage of Egypt – the bedrock of all our future suffering.

Joseph is in Egypt and becomes the country’s viceroy. He sends a message to his father, Jacob, to come join him with the entire family. Jacob comes and Joseph, along with his entire entourage – what in our day would constitute members of Congress, the president’s cabinet, and the elite media – goes to greet him.

Paradoxically, Joseph tells his father to present himself and the family to Pharaoh as shepherds. It’s an odd message, since the Egyptians, as Rashi notes, considered sheep to be sacred and held shepherds in disdain.

Why would Joseph wish to portray his family in such a negative light? Why would he wish to alienate them from Pharaoh and the Egyptian people?

Joseph, who had survived in Egypt for twenty-two years as a lone Jew, had become an expert in preserving Jewish life in exile. He knew that in order to protect his people from disappearing, he would have to settle them in their own community where they could adhere to their own traditions without being threatened by assimilation. But for that to happen, the Egyptians would have to keep Jews apart from the mainstream of Egyptian society and isolate them in their own neighborhood, hence Joseph’s instructions to Jacob. And indeed, a “Jewish city” arose – Goshen.

Thus, Joseph laid down one of the first principles of Jewish survival – a strong, self-contained Jewish community. The Jews prospered, but while they became a vital part of Egypt, they remained a nation apart. All this came to a dramatic halt with the death of the Jacob. This change is related in the Torah in so subtle a manner that the casual student would probably not even pick it up.

Every Torah portion in a sefer Torah either starts on a new line or is separated from the next portion by at least a nine-letter space. But the last portion of Genesis, Vayechi (Genesis 47:28-50:26), in which Jacob’s demise is announced, is not separated from the previous portion (Vayigash), and is therefore known as a “stuma” – closed.  Rashi explains that “with the death of the patriarch, the eyes and hearts of the Jewish people closed – shut down due to the anguish of the bondage.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/rebbetzins-viewpointrebbetzin-jungreis/pesachs-dusty-windows-part-four/2014/05/01/

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