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May 6, 2016 / 28 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Tamar’

New Israeli Gas Field Discovered, ‘Greatest Potential Since Leviathan’

Sunday, January 17th, 2016

ISRAMCO and Modiin Energy LP reported Sunday a new natural gas field has been discovered beneath the waves of the Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Israel, with “the greatest potential since Leviathan.”

The new gas field was discovered along the borders of the mammoth Tamar gas reservoir. It’s about the same size as Tamar, which currently serves much of Israel’s needs.

The reservoir was reported by Netherland, Sewell & Associates, Inc., in a resources estimate on the Daniel East and West licenses held by the two companies.

According to Tzahi Sultan, who owns part of the controlling interest in Modiin Energy, the Daniel licenses “have the greatest potential since Leviathan.”

Trading in Daniel East and Daniel West was suspended on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE) pending the announcement, according to Globes business news service.

“Gas reserves of this order could significantly change Israel’s energy industry,” Sultan was quoted by Globes. “If the potential is realized, the disocvery could help competition in the Israeli gas industry a great deal and could completely change the picture.”

After trading resumed, participation units in ISRAMCO jumped by 8.46 percent, and units in Modiin skyrocketed by 34.3 percent.

“We are excited at the potential that has been revealed for finding gas in the Daniel East and Daniel West licensed,” Modiin Energy CEO Ron Maor said in a statement.

“This is potential of a significant size which, if realized, could represent competition for the currently existing reserves, and improve the country’s energy security. Together with our partners we will carry out drilling to test the potential prospects as soon as possible.

“We hope that the State of Israel will encourage further activity in the potential gas reserves in the Daniel East and Daniel West fields.”

The Tamar gas field was discovered in January 2009, also in the Mediterranean Sea off the Israel coastline. The field is located in Israel’s exclusive economic zone, roughly 80 kilometers (50 miles) west of Haifa in waters 1,700 meters (5,600 feet) deep. The adjoining Tamar South field added even more reserves. Together, the two finds comprised the largest discovery at the time of gas or oil in the Levant basin of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

The Leviathan gas field is one of the world’s largest offshore gas finds of the past decade, and is believed to ultimately have the potential to change Israel’s relations with its neighbors. It is located about 47 kilometers (29 miles) southwest of Tamar, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) west of Haifa. It’s about 1,500 meters (4,900 feet) deep in the Levantine basin.

In November 2015, the developers of the Leviathan gas field closed and inked their first gas deal with Egypt.

Hana Levi Julian

Israel’s Leviathan Developers Ink Gas Deal With Egypt

Sunday, November 29th, 2015

Developers of the mammoth Leviathan natural gas field beneath Israel’s Mediterranean coastal waters have inked a deal with Egypt. It’s a deal that has had Israel’s government — and that of Cairo — holding their collective breath for months.

Leviathan will start pumping the natural gas to Egypt beginning in 2019 or 2020, for up to 15 years, according to the agreement. The price of the gas includes a floor price and is to be linked to the cost of Brent oil, Reuters reported.

The Leviathan developers and Egypt’s Dolphinus Holdings agreed in last week’s letter of intent to negotiate the terms on the final deal.

Natural gas will be pumped from Leviathan to the Dolphinus Holdings via an existing underwater pipeline, Dolphinus and the Leviathan developers said in a statement to the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE).

The pipeline was built nearly 10 years ago by East Mediterranean Gas (EMG) when gas was being piped from Egypt to Israel. At the time, EMG had been managing an Egyptian-Israeli gas agreement. But that deal collapsed in 2012 after unending terrorist attacks ended the flow in the gas pipeline that ran through the Sinai Peninsula.

Leviathan, which holds an estimated 622 bcm of gas, is being developed by the Texas-based Noble Energy and Delek Group through Delek Drilling and Avner Oil and Gas. Dolphinus represents Egypt’s non-governmental, industrial and commercial consumers.

“We’ve worked with Dolphinus before and we expect to reach a final agreement quickly,” Yossi Abu, CEO of Israel’s Delek Drilling told Reuters.

“The Egyptian market is thirsty for gas, both for domestic use and for their export facilities. There is a lot of room for cooperation there.”

Dolphinus already agreed earlier this year to a seven-year deal to purchase at least $1.2 billion of natural gas from the Israeli Tamar gas field.

Leviathan is located close to the Tamar field. Cyprus also has a role in some gas field development with Israel as well; the two countries share a common basic with Egypt which gas discoveries have been made.

In addition, the Italian company ENI announced in August of this year that it had discovered one of the largest gas fields in the world off Egypt’s Mediterranean coast. The reserves are estimated at about 30 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, the equivalent of about 5.2 billion barrels of oil.

Abu noted that the discoveries, together with Egypt’s cooperation, have created a natural leadership role in the region for Cairo.

“Egypt is becoming a regional hub through cooperation with the Leviathan and Tamar partners, and together with Israel and Cyprus,” he said.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the eastern Mediterranean contains huge gas reserves – estimated at approximately 122 trillion cubic feet.

Hana Levi Julian

Israel Reaches Gas Deal with Noble Energy, Delek Ltd. Group

Thursday, August 13th, 2015

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu announced Thursday the government has reached an agreement with developers of the nation’s largest natural gas field, Leviathan.

According to the agreement, there will be a ceiling on future sales to domestic firms and the consortium has committed to completing development of the gas field by 2020. It will be brought to the Cabinet for a vote on Sunday.

The agreement follows nearly a year of wrangling between regulatory agencies and the energy consortium between Texas-based Noble Energy, in which U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry also owns shares, and Israel’s Delek Ltd.

The problems began when Antitrust Authority director-general Prof. David Gilo ruled last December that the gas sector must be restructured. The Authority accused the Noble Energy – Delek Ltd. group of forming an illegal monopoly, raising red flags for others who called on the state to nationalize its gas reserves.

As a result of the regulatory quagmire that followed, numerous talks that were in process with other countries stalled – and then stopped entirely – as other firms lost patience with Israeli bureaucratic snarls.

Deals that were pending with companies in Egypt, Spain and other countries are now questionable, placing what might otherwise have been a healthy new market for Israeli natural gas possibly on indefinite hold.

As the energy group pointed out to the government at the time, unless the companies who initially discovered the fields can recover their investment and also make a profit from their work, there will be no reason for them to continue to drill or explore further.

Hana Levi Julian

Millionaire Geologist Langotsky to Knesset Committee: Don’t Sell Offshore Gas to Egypt – Are You Mad?

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

(JNi.media) The geologist behind Israel’s offshore natural gas field discoveries, Yossi Langotsky, told the Knesset Economic Committee on Monday, July 6, 2105, that “it is forbidden to export gas from the Tamar [gas field] to Egypt before the Leviathan [field] is connected —are you mad?”

The committee is reviewing the government’s proposal on a deal with the gas producers. The Knesset appears split between those urging the signing of a mediocre deal, giving the producers some advantages, but at the same time ending the 5-year delay in getting the off-shore energy over to Israel—and those who insist the gas producers could make a better offer that would result in significantly reducing the average Israeli’s energy costs.

Langotsky conceded that “all the security experts have decided that, for security reasons, we should export the gas to Egypt.”

“But it is stupidity, and national irresponsibility,” he protested, citing Former Shell president John Hofmeister, who warned in a Globes interview in June that “for the sake of Israel’s security, it should keep the natural gas it has found in the country, and convert everything it can to operate on gas.”

Hofmeister cautioned further: “Israel has many enemies and no oil. What will happen if an embargo imposed on it? If you think someone will come to the rescue, think again.”

Langotsky told the committee that the gas companies “are inherently thuggish. They want to maximize profits, it is their goal. But the state of Israel? Are you stupid? If, God forbid, something should happen to the Tamar field, or the pipe—sure, there will be a commission of inquiry to decide who’s at fault, but what good would it do us? ”

Langotsky, who for more than 10 years has been the driving force behind the off shore gas project, has been drilling the Promised Land for more than 40 years. And he knows all about thuggish gas companies — he spent several years fighting in arbitration to finally get his share in the discovery, in late 2011, about $100 million, give or take.

JNi.Media

Security Cabinet Unanimously Approves Moving Quickly to Develop and Expand Israel’s Gas Fields

Friday, June 26th, 2015

(Communicated by the Prime Minister’s Media Adviser)

The Security Cabinet unanimously decided on Thursday, that at this time, it is of decisive importance to move quickly to develop and expand the natural gas fields that have been discovered off Israel’s coasts, out of concern for state security and the foreign relations of the State of Israel.

The Security Cabinet also adopted Economy Minister Aryeh Deri’s proposal to transfer his authority under Article 52 of the 1988 Restrictive Trade Practices Law for Government approval. The outline will be published in the coming days and submitted for a public hearing

Jewish Press News Briefs

US Secy of State Kerry is Shareholder in Noble Energy’s Israeli Gas Group

Thursday, June 25th, 2015

An emerging compromise between the government and the natural gas group that discovered Israel’s offshore reservoirs is being discussed by the political-security cabinet Thursday (June 25) just as news is revealed the U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is one of the shareholders in Noble Energy.

In a 2013 declaration of assets published on opensecrets.org, Kerry’s shares in Noble Energy totaled an estimated $500,000 to $1 million.

The revelation comes as the cabinet mulls a compromise that would eliminate the need to break up the energy group formed by Noble Energy and Delek, Ltd.

Also on the table is the issue of what will happen with gas agreements Israel has with customers in Egypt if this issue is not sorted out quickly. A regulatory quagmire has stalled the process of setting up a pipeline to supply the gas from Leviathan to the British Gas liquefaction facility at Idku, Egypt.

Last June, the Leviathan partners had signed a letter of intent with BG in a $30 billion deal to supply 105 BCM of gas to the facility for 15 years. One sixth of the reservoir’s gas field would be exported in the deal, which is designed to make its development worthwhile.

In May 2014, the Tamar partners had signed a letter of intent with Spanish company Union Fenosa, which has a gas liquefaction facility in Damietta, Egypt. The Tamar group would supply the facility in Damietta with 70 BCM over 15 years, a deal worth nearly $20 billion. Union Fenosa Fenosa would pay for a gas pipeline to connect the Tamar reservoir to the Egyptian facility.

But Israel’s infamous snarl of political red tape got in the way, and everything came to a halt.

Last December, Israel Antitrust Authority director-general Prof. David Gilo ruled the gas sector must be restructured. Israel’s Antitrust Authority accused the Noble Energy – Delek Ltd. group of forming an illegal monopoly, raising red flags for others who called on the state to nationalize its gas reserves.

As a result of the regulatory quagmire, negotiations with Union Fenosa stalled – and then stopped. A senior company executive told Globes the firm has continued to hold talks with the Tamar group, but said “the situation between us and the Tamar partners is complicated and difficult. The negotiations between us have reached an impasse.”

Since Egypt does not have infinite patience or time to wait for gas to supply its local economy, it is now exploring other options. According to a report by Ernst & Young, it appears likely that Royal Dutch Shell will sell gas to the British Gas liquefaction facility in Idku. Another possible option is the Aphrodite reservoir in Cyprus.

Likewise, Jordan – which also is in process of negotiating a contract to import gas from Israel – has no time to waste in obtaining affordable natural gas for her citizens. She, too, is now seeking other alternatives thanks to Israeli red tape and political games. One possibility under discussion is the Gaza marine reservoir.

If that happens, Israel’s nascent gas export industry will drown.

Last December (2014), Kerry spoke with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in an effort to help resolve the issue. At the time, State Department spokesman Jeff Rathke said in a statement, “We continue to engage and we support all parties to move forward with the natural gas deal signed between Noble Energy and entities in Jordan and Egypt. We strongly believe that these deals would enhance energy security in the region.”

Since that time, Netanyahu appointed National Economic Council chairman Eugene Kandel to try to reach a compromise solution.

The energy group has been negotiating with the government ever since. The group hopes to continue operating as is, pointing out that unless the companies can make a profit, there will be no reason for them to explore or drill.

Hana Levi Julian

Israel to Export Gas to Egypt

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

The consortium that owns the huge off-shore Tamar natural gas field has signed a seven-year memorandum of understanding with the Egyptian Dolphinus Holdings to export of up to 2.5 billion cubic meters of gas to private Egyptian customers, Globes reported.

The deal is in addition to other sales by the owners of the Tamar and the Leviathan energy fields that have turned Israel into an energy exporter. Previously, Israel was dependent on Egypt for natural gas and had signed a long-term agreement with the regime of Hosni Mubarak. During and after the revolution that ended with his ouster and subsequent arrest and conviction for corruption.

Terrorists in the Sinai routinely blew up the pipeline through which gas flowed to Israel and Jordan.

Delek Drilling chairman and Avner CEO Gideon Tadmor, whose companies are part of the consortium, said, “The Tamar and Leviathan partnerships have so far signed a series of agreements designed to enable the supply of natural gas to the Palestinian Authority, to Jordan, and for export as liquid natural gas via the existing installations in Egypt. The MOU with Dolphinus is a further, important link in the series of agreements, allowing the supply of gas to the Egyptian domestic market as well. I have no doubt that these agreements will lead to a strengthening of Israel’s relations with its neighbors.”

The sale price of the gas will be dependent on the price of crude oil on the world market.

The Dolphinus Holding company reportedly represents large non-government industrial and commercial gas consumers.

The Leviathan consortium last month signed an agreement worth $15 billion with Jordan to export $45 billion worth of natural gas over a 15-year period.

Jordan has turned to Israel for gas because of the interruptions in the flow from Egypt.

In February, Tamar partners also announced an agreement to sell natural gas to Jordan through a new pipeline.

The exports of natural gas have played a major role in the increase of the value of the shekel until the shekel-dollar rate touched below 3.40 in the summer. It since has rebounded to nearly 3.75 shekels to the dollar because of reports of slower than expected growth on Israel, a cut in the interest rate and anticipation that the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank will raise the prime rate by early next year.

 

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/200594/2014/10/19/

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